Samuel Bowles to Deliver Inaugural Lecture "The Origins and Future of Economic Inequality" on February 2, 2016 to Introduce the Economics Department's Annual Samuel Bowles Lecture

Professor Emeritus Samuel Bowles will present his inaugural talk "The Origins and Future of Economic Inequality" to initiate the Annual Samuel Bowles Lecture on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 at 4pm in the Gordon Hall Conference Room.  The talk will be followed by hors d’oeuvres and drinks in the Gordon Hall atrium.  

This richly illustrated presentation will use economic, archaeological and other data from the long sweep of human history and prehistory to explore likely future trajectories of economic inequality. Bowles heads the Behavioral Sciences Program of the Santa Fe Institute and has taught economics at UMASS for four decades. He will outline the economic and political conditions that may favor those contesting injustice and allow for a more equal future.

UMass Economics in the News

Robert Pollin says if Hillary Clinton relying on husband, President Bill Clinton, for economic advice, that’s bad news for ordinary Americans
By: sgilroy - January 28, 2016

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, says if Hillary Clinton is relying on her husband, President Bill Clinton, for economic advice, that’s bad news for ordinary Americans. He argues that the Clinton administration policies favored the wealthy and Wall Street investors and made life more difficult for working people. (The Nation, 1/26/16)

 

Gerald C. Friedman cited in CNN article “5 unanswered questions about Bernie Sanders’ health care plan”
By: econnews - January 26, 2016

From CNN article by Tami Luhby (1/25/16):
Doctors would be paid 10.7% less and hospitals 9.4% less than what they receive from Medicare now, according to an analysis done for the Sanders campaign by Gerald Friedman, a University of Massachusetts at Amherst economics professor. He argues that providers will be able to handle the cuts because they’ll be able to save money on billing and insurance-related work.

Friedman pointed to a 2011 study in industry journal, Health Affairs, that estimated the average physician in Ontario spent about $22,200 per year interacting with Canada’s single-payer agency, while American doctors spend close to $83,000 a year, on average, dealing with insurers.
Read article….

Continued national news coverage of the work of Gerald C. Friedman and his economic analysis of Senator Bernie Sanders’ single-payer health care plan
By: econnews - January 26, 2016

There is continued national news coverage of the work of Gerald C. Friedman, economics, and his economic analysis of U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ single-payer health care plan. Sanders released details of the plan just prior to the Jan. 7 Democratic presidential debate and it has caused a lively debate about the overall cost and potential savings for Americans. Friedman says under the Sanders plan, spending would rise but there would also be huge savings for Americans because the plan would eliminate the cost of private insurers and control prices. (USA Today, 1/24/16; CNNMoney, 1/25/16)

 

James K. Boyce discusses recent news that global CO2 emissions have declined at the same time that the global economy has grown
By: sgilroy - January 12, 2016

James K. Boyce, economics and the Political Economy Research Institute, discusses recent news that global CO2 emissions have declined at the same time that the global economy has grown. He says it has long been accepted that rising incomes and declining CO2 could not happen at the same time, but now clearly that’s not true. Boyce says it’s good news that reducing CO2 in the atmosphere doesn’t automatically restrict growth in the economy. (The Real News Network, 12/14/15)

 

Lee Badgett featured economist at celebration of Human Rights Day at United Nations headquarters in NYC on December 10
By: econnews - December 9, 2015

December 10 is Human Rights Day and the 67th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each year the anniversary is commemorated by ceremonies and presentations at the United Nations headquarters in New York. The focus of this year’s presentations will include not only human rights but also economic development.
This year’s Human Rights Day will feature economist Lee Badgett, who published the first academic article on wage disparities faced by gay workers over twenty years ago. Last year she studied 39 emerging economies and showed that expanding LGBT rights could be part of a strategy to increase economic growth.  Read more……