Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation

         

In an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with C.J. Polychroniou for Truthout, Noam Chomsky and UMass Economics Professor Robert Pollin tackle such issues as what an authentically populist, progressive agenda would look like in the Trump era; what a progressive U.S. would look like with regard to jobs, the environment, finance capital and the standard of living; and what a progressive U.S. would look like in terms of education and health care, justice and equality.

Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation

Noam Chomsky is professor emeritus of linguistics at MIT and laureate professor in the department of linguistics at the University of Arizona.  Robert Pollin is distinguished professor of economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

 

M.V. Lee Badgett Named Spotlight Scholar for Her Work Fighting for LGBT Rights, Measuring the Cost of Discrimination

When economist M.V. Lee Badgett published her 1995 study on the wage gap faced by gay men and lesbians, there was nothing like it in the field. In fact, conventional wisdom held just the opposite.

"My first summer after grad school, I read an article in the Wall Street Journal about how wealthy the gay market was,” says Badgett, professor in the UMass Amherst Department of Economics and former director of the university’s School of Public Policy. “That didn’t mesh with the experience I’d seen.” Badgett’s research led her to data that confirmed her hypothesis: on average, gay and bisexual men earned between 11 and 27 percent less than their heterosexual counterparts. In other words, discrimination, not privilege, was the norm.

Badgett’s research was the first to look at LGBT realities through an economic lens. As an economist, she understood that money and power were intertwined. “I thought this was a really useful perspective to study issues of social justice,” she says. “It provided the tools to see what problems exist and the tools to make those problems better.”  READ MORE

 

Paul Krugman Delivered the Philip Gamble Memorial Lecture on Thursday, October 26 at 6:00pm at the Mullins Center

Nobel Prize-winning economist and columnist for The New York Times Paul Krugman delivered the annual Philip Gamble Memorial Lecture on Thursday, October 26 at 6:00pm at the Mullins Center. He spoke on “What’s the Matter with Economics?”

The Philip Gamble Memorial Lectureship Endowment was established by Israel Rogosa '42 and other family and friends in memory of Philip Gamble, a member of the economics faculty from 1935-71 and chair of the department from 1942 to 1965. The fund supports an annual lecture series featuring a prominent economist.

Krugman joined The New York Times in 1999 as an op-ed columnist, and his column is currently published every Monday and Friday. He is also a distinguished professor at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center, where he is a fellow at the Stone Center for the Study of Socioeconomic Inequality. In 2008, Krugman received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work on international trade theory.

The author or editor of 27 books and more than 200 papers in professional journals and edited volumes, his professional reputation rests largely on work in international trade and finance. Krugman is one of the founders of the “new trade theory,” a major rethinking of the theory of international trade, and in recognition of that work, in 1991 the American Economic Association awarded him its John Bates Clark medal.

UMass Economics in the News

Ina Ganguli’s article “Did the USSR top the US on gender equality in science?” published in University World News
By: sgilroy - December 11, 2017

From University World News
Ina Ganguli – 08 December 2017 Issue No:486

Valentina Tereshkova’s famous flight to space in 1963 became a striking symbol of the Soviet Union’s commitment to gender equality, heralding that Soviet women were indeed on “equal footing with men to advance science, culture and the arts”. 

Meanwhile, it took 20 more years for the first US woman, Sally Ride, to enter space in 1983. Was Tereshkova’s flight indicative of broader gender equality among Soviet scientists, with the US lagging behind? Or did the words of the Chair of the Soviet Women’s Committee Zoya Pukhova in 1988, that “there is a gap between the official policy of equality for women, and the reality, in which few keep pace with men in the working world”, ring true in Soviet academe?

The Soviet Union was ahead of other countries at the time on many key measures of gender equality, such as female labour force participation and representation among scientific researchers.
READ MORE….

Study by Gerald Friedman referenced in news analysis on projects the U.S. government could have funded with part of the $1.46 trillion spent on war-related costs between 2001 and June 2017
By: sgilroy - November 22, 2017

A news analysis on projects the U.S. government could have funded with just part of the $1.46 trillion spent on war-related costs between 2001 and June 2017 includes a reference to a study done by Gerald C. Friedman, economics, that says paying for expanded Medicare for more than 16 million people would cost about $5,527 per person. Friedman is incorrectly identified as being from the University of Amherst. (Newsweek, 11/6/17)

 

Robert Pollin says despite promises made by President Trump to bring jobs back to the coal industry, this isn’t going to happen
By: sgilroy - November 22, 2017

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, says despite promises made by President Donald J. Trump that he will bring jobs back to the coal industry, that isn’t going to happen. He says people in coal mining regions need to be trained for new, cleaner jobs that provide them with the same security and financial support they need. (The Real News Network, 11/12/17)

Robert Pollin cited in two news stories regarding a PERI study on the investments in renewable energy needed by the state of New York to meet its climate goals
By: sgilroy - November 22, 2017

Robert N. Pollin, co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute and Distinguished Professor in economics, is cited in two news stories. A new report from the PERI says New York is going to need to make some big investments in renewable energy to meet its climate goals. The PERI study says the state needs to spend between $4.5 billion and $5 billion in addition to what is already planned. The study says this would create 150,000 news jobs and could be paid for with a fee on climate pollution, a carbon tax. Pollin also is identified in a column as a supporter of a “Green New Deal” where public sector jobs would be created to build a new green energy infrastructure for the country funded in part by a carbon tax. (The American Prospect, 11/16/17; Public News Services, 11/15/17)

Robert Pollin talks about new report “Clean Energy Investment for New York State” co-authored by Pollin, Heidi Garrett-Peltier and Jeannette Wicks-Lim
By: sgilroy - November 22, 2017

Robert N. Pollin, Distinguished Professor in economics and co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute, talks about a new report “Clean Energy Investment for New York State” co-authored by Pollin, Heidi Garrett-Peltier and Jeannette Wicks-Lim, also faculty at PERI. (The Real News Network, 11/19/17)