Massachusetts Undergraduate Journal of Economics (MUJE) invites submissions

The Massachusetts Undergraduate Journal of Economics (MUJE) seeks your outstanding writing on economics. We welcome submissions on economic topics from undergraduate students in all majors at the Five Colleges and at all institutions of public higher education in the Commonwealth. You may submit new work or previously submitted coursework. 

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Ina Ganguli interviewed on Connecting Point about new study on how women network and land leadership roles

Faculty member Ina Ganguli was interviewed on the local public affairs television show Connecting Point about a new study on how women network and land leadership roles. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that women used both a wide network of personal contacts, and in addition, they depended on a close inner circle of other women who could offer support and gender-specific job advice.

Carly McCann discusses on Connecting Point research on employer retaliation against those who report sexual harassment in the workplace

A new report by UMass Amherst’s Center for Employment Equity presents research findings that nearly two-thirds of employees who report workplace sexual harassment face retaliation from their employers. Co-authors Carly McCann, a doctoral student in economics, and Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, professor of sociology, discussed their findings in a segment of the nightly news program Connecting Point.

UMass Economics in the News

Economics Robert Pollin is quoted in an interest Bloomberg article about financing opportunities/options for a green new deal. Wall Street Is More Than Willing to Fund the Green New Deal. Investing in the environment is already a $12 trillion market. Now markets are just looking for guidance from Congress. (Bloomberg  2/14/19).

Ina Ganguli, economics, is interviewed on the local public affairs television show Connecting Point about a new study on how women network and land leadership roles. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that women used both a wide network of personal contacts, and in addition, they depended on a close inner circle of other women who could offer support and gender-specific job advice. (WGBY-TV 57, 2/11/19)