Table of contents from 1986 - 1989


Volume XIV Number 4 - Summer 1989

IN BRIEF

THE GOOD LIFE OF LOREN BARITZ
A cultural historian's new book looks for the soul of the American middle class.

POETICS AND POLITICS
Five College Irish Studies Program covers the complexity of modern Ireland.

NOT JUST ANOTHER PRETTY PLACE
A very cool store design takes first place in regional competition.

A FINE KETTLE OF FISH
What could fish guts and gourmet cookies possibly have in common? Cooperative Extension, of course.

A NOVEL APPROACH
Art historian Criag Harbison reads a picture like a book, and what a story it is.

STEEL COLLAR WORKERS
Engineer Bartholomew Nnaji is converting ignornat robots into intelligent factory workers.

THE ESSENTIAL ESTHER
Esther Terry talks about her past and the mission of the Afro-American studies department.

GENDER & JUSTICE
Equal justice under the law? After an internship at the Supreme Court, Joyce O'Connor has her doubts.

UNNATURAL DISASTER
Ornithologist Rebecca Field ponders the impact of the Exxon oil spill on the birds of Alaska -- and the people.

MR
A new short story anthology showcases a quarter century of the best writing from the university's literary magazine.


Volume XIV Number 3 - Spring 1989

BLOOD SPORT
Historian Carlin Barton takes on Roman gladiators and finds more than gore in their deadly game.

DANUBE BLUES
A dam project changes the course of a mighty river, and protests change the course of Hungarian social policy.

DEATH OF A SMALL PLANET
It's good news for nobody but the taxidermist, if we keep on trashing the rain forest.

LITTLE SHOP OF WONDERS
Fabricating fantasies in the theater department's costume shop.

DAY CARE
We want the best for our kids, but are we ready to take day care seriously?

PLAY-DOH & SOCRATES
Gareth Matthews is convinced that philosophy comes naturally to young children.

COMRADES
From blinis to Big Macs, Russian and American students get it together.

NEW HORIZONS FOR HOME ECONOMICS
A long way from brownie bake-offs -- Penny Ralston takes home ec in another direction.

EDUCATION UNDER FIRE
Rifles lean against classroom walls in Eritrea -- because you can't hold a gun and a pen at the same time.


Volume XIV Number 2 - Winter 1989

FAMILY TIME
On a kibbutz, living apart can bring families together.

HANDS-ON HEARING
The art and politics of sign language for the deaf.

WHITE & WORRIED
A campus group gives whites a way to work on their racism.

BACTERIA TO THE FUTURE
To biologist Lynn Margulis, human beings are "just a certain idiosyncratic form of bacteria."

HOUSE
Four scholars take four different tacks over tea at Historic Deerfield.

SCIENCE FICTION STAR
Samuel Delany rockets the pulp genre into a new literary dimension.

THE BIG PICTURE
Time, space, and toddlers in the studio of natural history painter Will Sillin.

BREEZY RIDER
Flying into the heart of a hurricane -- who'd have thought microwave engineering would be this wild?

SOUL ON ICE
Sister Jeanette Corneau goes to prison to help prostitutes, drug addicts, and other outcasts "discover their best selves."


Volume XIV Number 1 - Fall 1988

HELLO MR. CHIPS
Wood technologist R. Bruce Hoadley delves into the secrets beneath the veneer of valuable antique furniture.

GIVING SOMETHING BACK
Geologist Julie Brigham-Grette helps close the communication gap between visiting scientists and the Inuit people of the Arctic.

MYSTERY OF THE MAPLE MENACE
Entomological sleuth T. Michael Peters tracks down the tiny insect that is defoliating acres of sugar maples.

BODY BEAUTIFUL?
Pumping iron can take a body to its physical limits, but is body building a sport or beauty pageantry?

FLIGHT OF THE FALCON
Once extinct east of the Mississippi, peregrine falcons are back. Five of them now make their home atop the university's tower library.

NATIVE SON
Paul Theroux, celebrity author of movies, novels, and travel books, began his career as a stubborn student activist and continues to be a thorn in the side of the establishment.

STUDENT OF THE 80S
The university's oldest student is still learning after all these years.

SOCIAL DISEASE
An epidemic of ignorance and hysteria impedes efforts to cope with the spread of AIDS. A new book recommends dramatic changes in social policy.

GETTING INTO THE ACT
On location in Northampton, students gain practical experience as they help produce a film for PBS.


Volume XIII Number 3 - Spring 1988

WRITE FROM THE HEART
Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Madeleine Blais reads voraciously, writes passionately, and teaches tenderly.

MATH FOR THE MARKET
Anna Nagurney nets an international award for her mathematical models of economic problems.

ADVOCATES FOR ADDITIVES
Why are these two men smiling as they contemplate the preservatives in our groceries?

INTERIORS
Architect Pat Eidson designs interior space concepturally, elegantly, and functionally.

COLLARING BABY BOOM VOTERS
Ralph Whitehead turned the American political scene on its ear with two little words.

BAR MITZVAH
The often misunderstood coming of age ceremony is an important time for the Jewish family.

CHINUA ACHEBE
Things fell aprt when the British colonized Africa; Achebe put things back together by bringing the african novel back home.

ALL GOD'S CHILDREN
America's burgeoning religious diversity roduces Buddhists as well as Baptists, Muslims along with the Methodists.

HOT LICKS
Knocking the socks off the judges at three recent competitions, the student jazz band can blow their own horn.


Volume XIII Number 4 - Summer 1988

BOOGIE BUDDIES
A white guy from Cape Cod taking piano lessons from Harlem's king of boggie woggie? Why not?

FOOD FIGHT
Latke versus hamantasch. Tongue-in-cheek scholars debate merits of rival Jewish delicacies.

YASUKO FUKUMI'S GOLDEN HARVEST
A modest librarian's fund-raising coup nets extraordinary Japanese book collection.

FLOCKING TO THE FARM
Shepherd Kristen Whittle keeps the university's four-legged friends in fine fettle.

SHADES OF MEANING
When things get hot, what looks cool? A photographic sampling of sunglasses on campus.

ACE OF DIAMONDS
From Africa to the Arctic, geologist Stephen Haggerty leaves no precious stone unturned.

GROWING UP ARMENIAN
Arlene Avakian takes a personal journey of feminist politics and ethnic self-discovery.

TRASHING PLASTIC
Chemists study biodegradable polymers that could put an end to plastic pollution.

ON STAGE FOR STATISTICS
Charismatic teacher Bernie Morzuch brings pizazz to a relentlessly technical subject.

BROADCAST NEWS
A small station makes a big hit at National Public Radio headquarters in Washington.


Volume XIII Number 2 - Winter 1988

BODY AND SOUL
Microbiologist Albey Reiner takes his students to the edge of medical knowledge about cancer.

THE SEDUCTIVE SALAMANDER
What makes these little critters so adorable that a whole town makes the earth move to improve their lovelife?

EXPERT WITNESS
Psychologist Susan Fiske studies stereotyping in the laboratory, and combats it in the classroom.

PARKING SPACE - THE FINAL FRONTEIR
Will the author find a parking space? Does he become a member of the vehicular elect? Reminiscences of life at the mercy of the meter.

A VOICE OF HER OWN
Estela Olevsky doesn't just play a piano - she makes it sing.

OUR MAN IN WASHINGTON
Monetary policy expert Andrew Brimmer, formerly a member of the Federal Reserve Board, joins the university's economics department.

POETRY IN MOTION
Paul Mariani shares his passion for poetry with students and teachers in a Springfield high school.

MORE THAN SKIN DEEP
The history of the cosmetics industry has led Kathy Peiss to the Smithsonian where she is unearthing some funny and surprising facts.


Volume XII Number 3 - Spring 1987

DISABLING ATTITUDES
Activist Laura Rauscher says society's stgma is the real handicap.

CHINESE FOLKTALES
Legends from China's minorities appear in print and in English for the first time.

CONTROVERSIAL THEORISTS
How we look at how we look at literature -- poststructuralists shake up lit crit.

WHERE STARS ARE BORN
Judith Young trains her telescope on galaxies 60 million light years away, looking for the birth of a star.

ARGENTINA AND US
The university's connection with Argentina promotes collaboration and mutual understanding.

LEARNING ON LOCATION
Argentine historian, here on academic exchange, talks about his country and studies ours.

COMMUNICATING CULTURE
Argentina's new government has created challenges for the emerging communications field - a Umass team was there.

RISKY BUSINESS
Can gambling on the job increase productivity?

SEEING INTO THE FUTURE
A robot is rolling along campus paths giving researchers a new view of computer vision.


Volume XII Number 4 - Summer 1987

UNCUT JULES
Mensch-in-residence Jules Chametzky talks about ethnicity and literature in his life and his work.

ORDER ON THE COURTS
Glenn Wong has written the book on the newest game in town - sports law.

TAKING SHAPE
A zest for life and art makes Dorrance Hill an irresistible force in the classroom.

THE VOLGA DEUTSCH OF ARGENTINA
German peasants living in Argentina? Richard Wilkie has followed and photographed their lives for 20 years.

TELL ME A STORY
And a tale was told about writers, artists, and educators who gathered each year to talk about children's literature.

CURTAIN CALL
Doris Abramson takes a bow after a remarkable career as a scholar of black theater.

ORDINARY PEOPLE
Roland Sarti's award-winning book on Italian social history celebrates the life of his native village.


Volume XIII Number 1 - Fall 1987

LEMUR FEMUR DREAMER
Paleontologist Laurie Godfrey digs the fabulous fauna of Madagascar.

LIGHTS, CAMERA, REWRITE!
Audiences help shape new plays at the innovative Theater in the Works.

INSIDER/OUTSIDER
In England, Wyoming, Maine, and Massachusetts, novelist John Wideman still hears the voices of black Pittsburgh.

THE SAME NAME GAME
Will the real Paul J. Godfrey please stand up!

MAKING ROOM FOR ISLAM
Historian Yvonne Haddad says it's time to unlearn those negative stereotypes about the Muslim world.

RECIPE FOR A VOLCANO
Michael Rhodes demonstrates that volcanoes are just a piece of cake.

THINKING GAMES CHILDREN PLAY
Carolyn Edwards teaches teachers how to raise social and moral issues in the classroom.

FACING RACISM
In the aftermath of the Southwest incident, eight undergraduates talk about the tense state of black and white at the university.


Volume XII Number 2 - Winter 1987

WHY DOES EVERYONE HATE BATS?
Zoologist David Klingener goes to bat for an animal with a bad reputation.

BATTLING THE BODY
Anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders sre signs of a generation's distorted self-image.

BLOWIN' IN THE WIND
Engineer Robert Kirchoff studies those tricky air currents around tall buildings.

A COMPLEX EDIFICE
Our towering brick and stone skyscrapers -- why are they here, who designed them, and are they architecture or art?

SEDUCTIVE SCENTS
When insects communicate, there's literally a lot of chemistry between them.

PRESERVING WOMEN'S WORDS
From Brazilian oral histories to forgotten English novels, Daphne Patai is working for the survival of women's words.

LEARNING TOGETHER
Waldne Learning Center takes a new approach to the education of autistic children.

MASS TRANSFORMATION
A monumental volunteer effort turns into a campus joke into a symbol of community pride.


Volume XII Number 1 - Fall 1986

SWIMMING UPSTREAM
Salmon are battling their way back up the Connecticut with a little help from their friends.

PRIVATE VOICES
Margo Culley's new book documents the diaries of women as they view their life one day at a time.

CHECKING THE OIL
Can Malaysia's palm oil crop combat cancer? Chemist Barrie Tan thinks so.

THE PROLIFIC ARTHUR KINNEY
With four new books, this Renaissance scholar continues to set a formidable pace.

NEW VACCINES AGAINST DEADLY DISEASES
Researchers are finding ways to prevent the spread of Japanese encephalitis and leishmaniasis.

MILITARY JUSTICE ON TRIAL
Richard Minear asks whether Japan was guilty of war crimes or whether the Tokyo Trials were simply victor's revenge.

IVY-COVERED SALESMANSHIP
Sophisticated marketing techniques are helping the university compete successfully in the new, competitive college admissions.

ALL THAT JAZZ
July sizzles with jazz as students learn the language of improvisation from a faculty of "jazz heroes."


Volume XI Number 3 - Spring 1986

WORLD VIEW
Lewis Hanke's new book takes a global perspective on U.S. history.

AMERICA SAYS A MOUTHFUL
A new dictionary collects regional variations in the English language.

MAKING THE PEACE
Mediators tackle the smoking issue at a symposium led by ex-president Jimmy Carter.

TUNING IN HALLEY'S COMET
Astronomers use radio waves to study the composistion of the comet.

TAKING UP SPACE
Five artists illustrate the many dimensions of sculpture at the university.

THE GOOD OLD DAYS
The Center on Aging reports some good news about old age.

FOR WHAT IT'S WORTH
The debate continues - should work of comparable value be rewarded with equal pay?

SOX APPEAL
An internship with the Red Sox provides fun, glamour, and a lot of hard work.


Volume XI number 4 - Summer 1986

A SOUTH AFRICAN STORY
Makaziwe Mandela, daughter of Nelson Mandela, talks of life in her country.

THE ACID TEST
William Manning studies the devastating effects of acid rain on plants and sculptures.

HOW CREAMY YOUR PEANUT BUTTER?
From the consistency of your spread to the aerodynamics of your fish - food engineers engage in tasty and useful science.

TEACHING IN TONGUES
Spanish, English, Creole and more - linguists advise Nicaraguans on primary education.

BENEATH THE SURFACE
David Hoffman has proven the existence of a new minimal surface - the first in two centuries.

PICASSO OF THE PIXELS
Rick Newton, darkroom wizard, takes scientific data and turns it into art.

BIRDSONG
Donald Kroodsma deciphers those lyrical avian trills and hears serious messages of territory and sex.

HANDLE WITH CARE
Donna Carey sees to the health and welfare of the animal subjects of university research.

ENTERTAINMENT AND EXCESS
Charles Rearick's new book takes a critical and affectionate look at turn-of-the-century France.

 


1990 - 1992 1993 - 1996 1983-1985