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Spring 2016

WOMENSST 201   ̶  Gender and Difference: Critical Analysis
#1   Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. – Kiran Asher 
#2   Tuesday, Thursday 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. – Christie Barcelos (syllabus)
#3   Monday, Wednesday 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. – Tanisha Ford

An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in a commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are ‘gender’,’sexuality’,’race’ and ‘class’? How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, nationality (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics; environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field. 


WOMENSST 285   ̶  Introduction to Biology of Difference (syllabus)
Monday, Wednesday 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Laura Briggs

The course centrally examines our understanding of the "body?". While humans have many similarities and differences, we are organized around certain axes of "difference" that have profound consequences - sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, religion, nationality etc. These differences can shape not only group affiliation and identity, but also claims about intellectual and behavioral capacities. This course will explore popular claims, critiques and understandings of "difference" as well as academic research, its claims, debates and critiques. This is an interdisciplinary course that will draw from the biological and social sciences and the humanities. We will explore principles of human biology - anatomy, physiology, sex/gender/sexuality, reproductive biology, genetics, as well as the scientific method(s) and experimental designs. The course will give students the tools to analyze scientific studies, to understand the relationship of nature and culture, science and society, biology and politics.  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate.  Gen Ed (U, SI)


WOMENSST 290C   ̶ History of Sexuality & Race in U.S. (HS,U)
Monday, Wednesday 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.  
Discussion sections Friday 10:10, 11:15
Angela Willey
Distribution Requirement(s):  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider the history of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within women’s and gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize the links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics from the science of sex and sexuality to marriage debates in light of histories of racial and sexual formations.  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate. 


WOMENSST 291E    ̶ Feminist Health Politics (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

What is health?  What makes health a matter of feminism?  And what might a feminist health politics look like?  These questions lay at the heart of this course.  In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states.  We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living.   Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented. This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate.


WOMENSST 295C   ̶ Career and Life Choices (for senior majors only, 2 credit, pass/fail) (syllabus)
Wednesday 2:30 p.m. – 4:10 p.m.
Karen Lederer

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies teaches critical thinking skills.  How can students use these skills to make informed career choices?  How is it possible to engage in planning one’s career while conscious of the realities of race, gender, sexuality, and class in today’s economy?  What are career options for students whose values include working for a better society?  Is it possible to put together a balanced life and pay the bills besides?  How can pressured college seniors, particularly activists, get all the career tasks they need to do done (resume writing, budgeting, researching career opportunities, networking, informational interviews) while finishing out their college degree?  Students will formulate their own career questions and choices.  The first part of the semester is self awareness, articulating interests, skills and values.  The second part of the semester focuses on workforce information, practical job search skills, and research on a possible field.  Assignments include: self awareness exercises, informational interviews, budget, resume, cover letter, career research and more.


WOMENSST 295Q   ̶ Black Queer Feminisms
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Mecca Sullivan
Distribution Requirement(s):  Critical Race Feminisms, Transnational Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

This course will explore the writing, music, art, media and cultural thought of queer feminist figures of the African Diaspora. Pairing important creative works with key texts in black queer and feminist theory from various Diaspora locations, we will explore the landscape of contemporary cultural production among black queer feminist communities on a transnational stage. Our work will take us through several genres including poetry, fiction, hip-hop music and videos, blogs and web communities, film, webseries, and drama, and will take up the work of contemporary black LGBT and queer feminist artists from several Diaspora locales including South Africa, England, Germany, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Canada, Cuba, the U.S. and others. Throughout our discussions, we’ll examine the shifting meanings of terms like “black,” “feminist,” and “queer” in each of the settings, and consider how they expand and challenge our own understandings of difference and power. Assignments include regular participation, in-class writing, a short paper, a final paper, a final project, and some creative work. Prior coursework in WGSS, Afro-American Studies, and/or English will be helpful. 


WOMENSST 297S   ̶ Girls in the System: Gender and Juvenile Justice (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Adina Giannelli

This 200-level, interdisciplinary seminar will consider the role of gender in the juvenile justice system, in the United States and transnationally. Drawing on sociological literature, social critiques, policy papers, case law, documentary film, personal narratives, and even fiction, we will learn about and reflect upon the issues experienced by girls in the system. Final assignment will be student-driven, in consultation with instructor.  In the context of this course, we will critically examine the history of girls in the juvenile justice system; what it means to be in “the system”; the role of “justice” in the juvenile system; and the relationship between gender and justice. We will review some of the major issues faced by the girls who are subject to this system. Finally, we will explore the following questions:  What are the goals of the juvenile justice system, and whose interests does it serve? Who is tracked into the system, and why? What is the relationship between race, gender, sexuality, culture and tracking, diversion, alternatives, and outcomes for girls in the juvenile justice system? How does the system address--or fail to address--issues of education, health, wellness, and community? And how do those who are subject to this system contest its confines, demonstrating voice, vision, and agency?  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate. 


WOMENSST 391D/JUDAIC 383 – Women, Gender, Judaism
Wednesday 2:30-5:15
Susan Shapiro

This course examines the ways in which the gendered categories "woman/women" (as opposed to that of "man/men"), the "feminine" (as opposed to that of the "masculine") and sexuality/ies differently construe the character of Judaism.  "Judaism" is here understood in religious, cultural and social terms.  The main focus is on historical constructions of gender roles and identities in Judaism and their cultural and social consequences.  The course begins in the biblical period and goes up to the present.


WOMENSST 392AA   ̶ Asian American Feminisms (syllabus)
Tuesday 2:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Millian Kang
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

How have the figures of the Chinese bachelor, the geisha, the war bride, the hermaphrodite, the orphan, the tiger mother, the Asian nerd, the rice king, the rice queen, and the trafficked woman shaped understandings of Asian Americans, and how have these representations been critiqued by Asian American feminist scholars and writers?  Is there a body of work that constitutes "Asian American feminism(s)" and what are its distinctive contributions to the field of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies?  How does this body of work illuminate historical and contemporary configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class, nation, citizenship, migration, empire, war, neoliberalism and globalization?  In exploring these questions, this course examines Asian American histories, bodies, identities, diasporic communities, representations, and politics through multi- and interdisciplinary approaches, including social science research, literature, popular representations, film, poetry and art.   This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate. 


WOMENSST 392J/692J   ̶ Feminisms & Environmental Justice (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Kiran Asher
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

While feminism and environmental justice are both political projects of social change, their objects or objectives are not the same. As we sink into the 21st century, amid looming fears of ecological catastrophes and socio-economic crises, is a conversation between these two projects likely to be productive for both struggles, or are their goals at odds with each other?  This class will examine the perceived, existing, and potential links (or disjuncts) between feminism and environmental justice. Our interdisciplinary inquiry will be guided by questions such as:  What is understood by the terms "feminism" and "environmental justice"?   How have nature and the environment figured in feminist writings and feminist ideas of justice?  Conversely, how do women and gender figure in ideas and struggles for environmental justice?  Indeed, how do feminist ideals inform (or not) other struggles for social change (such as those of peasants, workers, ethnic groups, queer folk, and more)? 


WOMENSST 392Q - Introduction to Queer Theory
Tuesday, Thursday 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Abigail Boggs
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

This course will introduce students to the field of queer studies through an exploration of three distinct yet related questions: where did queer studies come from, where is it going, and what does it do? On the one hand, this course provides students with grounding in the critical theories and histories informing the emergence of the field in the 1990s. What came before queer theory? What are the meanings of the word “queer”? How is “queer studies” different from “feminist studies” or “lesbian and gay studies”? What can “queer” as a theory and a method offer our studies of bodies, desires, and practices? Is there a connection between “queer theory” and “queer politics”? On the other hand, this course invites students to engage with some of the most recent interventions into the field. How have scholars brought “queer” into conversation with postcolonial studies, critical race theory, disability studies, and Native American Studies? What are the limits and possibilities of these projects? In what ways have the recent trends within queer studies made possible critical interventions beyond the realm of sex and sexuality? How does queer theory open new ways of imagining and inhabiting the world? Importantly, rather than attempting to construct a tidy chronology of the field, we will dedicate the quarter to investigating particular conversations that have pushed scholars of queer studies to think and theorize the world and the field more queerly.  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate. 


WOMENSST 394R   ̶ Sexual & Reproductive Rights in Latin America (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
Cora Fernandez-Anderson
Distribution Requirement(s):  Sexuality Studies, Transnational Feminisms

Since the 1990s Latin America has witnessed increasing societal and political debates over sexual and reproductive rights. Issues such as contraceptives, abortion, gay marriage, transgender rights, sexual education and assisted reproductive technology have risen to the top of some countries' agendas after decades of silence, taboos, and restrictive or non-existent legislation. The course aims to provide a survey of sexual and reproductive rights in Latin America comparing the region as a whole with other areas of the world, while at the same time highlighting the disparities that exist within it. The course analyzes the multiple factors behind the current policies focusing particularly on the role of women and gay rights movements in advancing more liberal legislation. In addition, we will look at the role of the Catholic Church in these debates and their struggles to prevent any legislative change that goes against their doctrine from happening. Among the cases we will explore are Argentina’s gay marriage and gender identity legislation, Uruguay's decriminalization of abortion, Costa Rica's ban on IVF technologies and Peru's coercive sterilization program of indigenous populations.  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate.


WOMENSST 395F   ̶ Feminism, Comedy and Humor (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

The popularity of shows like Inside Amy Schumer and Broad City and the clout of performers such as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Wanda Sykes have arguably put to rest the old stereotype that women aren’t funny.  More importantly, they have all shown that comedy and humor can be vehicles for feminist messages.  In so doing, they have built upon a legacy established by performers, writers, directors, and activists extending back to feminism’s “first wave.”  In this course, we will examine the intersections of feminism, comedy, and humor, and will explore questions such as: Why and how have feminists used humor and comedy for political ends?  Why have feminists, and women more generally, been seen as inherently unfunny?  In what ways is comedy and humor gendered?  What roles do race, class, and sexuality play?  And is humor and comedy available to all feminists, and to all feminist causes, or do the stakes and effects vary according to one’s social position and subject matter?  In addition to analyzing a wide range of media, we will create and explore our own forms of feminist comedic interventions.


WOMENSST 395W   ̶ Contemporary Black Women Writers (syllabus)
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Emily Lordi
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course will examine works of fiction, drama, poetry, and criticism published by African American women writers from 1970 to the present. We will ask how and to what extent these writers sustain a culturally-specific literary tradition in the "post-Civil Rights" era, and we will analyze the strategies through which they propose new understandings of blackness, gender, sexuality, community, and artistry. While we will interpret these works in light of socio-historical developments, we will also ask how these authors create new conceptual realities through their imaginative and critical works. Authors may include Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange, Octavia Butler, bell hooks, Patricia Williams, Andrea Lee, Suzan-Lori Parks, Natasha Trethewey, Danielle Evans, Mecca Sullivan. 


WOMENSST 493S/693S   ̶ Theories of Social Justice (syllabus)
Monday 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Ann Ferguson

The course will compare and contrast general theories of social justice, including the classic liberal approaches of John Rawls, the radical critique of Marx and contemporary critics of social injustice, such as Charles Mills (The Racial Contract) and Iris Young (Justice and the Politics of Difference and Responsibility for Justice). We will apply these approaches to contemporary issues of social injustice such as racism, class exploitation, sexism, heteronormativity and transphobia, and human environmental damage. We will read short selections on social injustice, including the racism of the criminal justice system (Alexander The New Jim Crow), global injustice due to capitalist exploitation and imperialism (Hardt and Negri Declarations), institutionalized sexism (Fraser ?After the Family Wage?) and reproductive justice (Fried and Ross ?From Abortion Rights to Reproductive Justice?), LGBT discrimination (Feinberg Transliberation) and environmental injustice (Klein This Changes Everything).  Course requirements include class participation and homework questions, short paper and/or class report, and term paper.  Texts include Sterba, ed. Justice: Alternative Political Perspectives, and other short readings available online and on library reserve. Those taking Womenst 693 will be expected to do a short paper as well as a class report and their term papers will involve more bibliographical references.   Students may elect to take an optional one or two credit practicum from WGSS. The practicum would focus on a particular social justice issue, with service work to be arranged with a local social justice group. Please see instructor to make arrangements to sign up for such a practicum.  This course counts towards the Five College Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice Certificate. 


WOMENSST 494TI   ̶ Unthinking the Transnational (syllabus)
Monday 1:25 p.m. – 3:55 p.m. 
Alexandrina Deschamps 
Distribution Requirement(s):  Transnational Feminisms

This course is about the framework of transnational women's and gendered activisms and scholarship. We will survey the field of transnational feminist research and praxis, locating structures of power, practices of resistance, and the geographies of development at work in a range of theories and social movements. The course will not only examine the implementation of feminist politics and projects that have sought to ensure some measurable social, cultural, and economic changes, but also explore the ways conceptions of the `global' and `transnational' have informed these efforts. Students will have the opportunity to assess which of these practices can be applicable, transferable, and/or travel on a global scale. We will focus not only on the agency of individuals, but also on the impact on people's lives and their communities as they adopt strategies to improve material, social, cultural, and political conditions of their lives. Satisfies the Integrative Experience for BA-WoSt majors. 


WOMENSST 691B    ̶  Issues in Feminist Research
Wednesday 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. 
Tanisha Ford

This seminar is organized around graduate student presentations of their own research and will include some readings on general questions of feminist methodology and ethics of research.  Students will be expected to do the reading, present their research, and discuss others'.  Preference for enrollment will be given to students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  Please email Linda Hillenbrand (lindah@wost.umass.edu) to enroll in the course or be added to the list for non-certificate students.  


WOMENSST 692Q    ̶  Queer Theories of Power and Temporality
Thursday 1:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Abigail Boggs  
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

Over the course of the last decade, scholars across the fields of queer theory, postcolonial studies, disability studies, critical ethnic studies, and feminist theory have increasingly turned to the rubric of temporality. This graduate level seminar will explore the motivations, implications, and consequences of what is now understood as “the temporal turn.” If, as in Jose Estaban Munoz’s formulation, queerness is an “ideality” always out of reach, perceptible only as a “the warm illumination of a horizon imbued with potentiality,” what lines of inquiry, analysis and exploration may be opened by queer approaches to temporality, genealogy, history and the future? To take up this question, we will turn to recent works that fit squarely within the field of queer theory by scholars such as Elizabeth Freeman, Jack Halberstam, Alison Kafer and Carolyn Dinshaw while also expanding our readings to include authors more conventionally located in feminist studies and Asian American studies such as Neferti Tadiar and Lisa Lowe.

Students who entered as of Fall 2013 will be required to fulfill a distribution requirement, enabling students to gain a breadth of knowledge in the areas of critical race feminisms (CRF), transnational feminisms (TNF), and sexuality studies (SS). Majors will be required to take at least two courses (total) chosen from two of the above categories. Minors will be required to take at least one course from one of the above categories. Students who declared a major or minor prior to Fall 2013 may continue to follow the previous requirements should come see an advisor. Note: If a course has more than one designation listed, it can only fulfill ONE of the requirements. The major can select which designation they want that particular class to fulfill.

 

CRF

TNF

SS

UMass Amherst

WOMENSST 290C   ̶ History of Sexuality & Race in U.S. (HS,U)

 

 

X

WOMENSST 291E    ̶ Feminist Health Politics

 

 

X

WOMENSST 295Q   ̶ Black Queer Feminisms 

X

X

X

WOMENSST 392AA   ̶ Asian American Feminisms

 

X

 

WOMENSST 392J/692J   ̶ Feminisms & Environmental Justice

 

X

 

WOMENSST 392Q S-Introduction to Queer Theory

 

 

X

WOMENSST 394R S   ̶ Sexual & Reproductive Rights in Latin America

 

X

X

WOMENSST 395W   ̶ Contemporary Black Women Writers

X

 

 

WOMENSST 494TI   ̶ Unthinking the Transnational 

 

X

 

WOMENSST 692Q    ̶  Queer Theories of Power and Temporality

 

 

X

AFROAM 252 – Afro-American Image in American Writing

X

 

 

AFROAM – 297F – Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean

X

X

 

AFROAM 390E – Race, Ethnicity and Gender in U.S. Hist

X

 

 

AFROAM 391B – Modern Afro-American Novelists

X

 

 

AFROAM 392C – Songbirds, Bluewsomen, Soulwomen

X

 

 

AFROM 491C – Cuba:  Social History of Race, Class & Gender

X

X

 

AFROM 691D – Black Women in the Civil Rights Movement

X

 

 

ANTHRO 297O – Gender in Hip Hop Culture

X

 

 

COMM 290AH – Media, Public Opinion and LGBT Rights

 

 

X

ENGLISH 891MQ – Materialism and Queer Theory

 

 

X

HISTORY 365H/697LG – U.S. LGBT and Queer History

 

 

X

HISTORY 393I – Indigenous Women of North America

X

 

 

HISTORY 397LEH – Liberation or Equality?:  History of LGBT Rights Law

 

 

X

HISTORY 397MJ – The Woman in Modern Japan

 

X

 

HISTORY 397REH/697RE – Race, Sex and Empire:  Britain and India

 

X

X

HISTORY 450 – Junior Year Writing Seminar in History - Sex and the Supreme Court

 

 

X

HISTORY 797LG – U.S. LGBT & Queer History Research Seminar

 

 

X

JAPANESE 391/591M - Queer Japan in Literature and Culture

 

 

X

POLSCI 394BI – The Body Politic

 

 

X

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience

 

 

X

SOCIOL 381 – Racism at Work

X

 

 

SOC 387 – Sexuality and Society

 

 

X

UMass CPE

LEGAL 392LA – Legal Activism and Same Sex Marriage

 

 

X

SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society

 

 

X

Amherst College

POSC 300 – Sexuality and LGBT Rights in Central America and the Caribbean

 

X

X

SWAG 207/POSC 207/ASLC 207 – The Home and the World:  Women and Gender in South Asia

 

X

 

SWAG 208/BLST 345/ENGL 276/FAMS 379 – Black Feminist Literary Traditions

X

 

 

SWAG 224/HIST 224/EUST 224 – The Century of Sex:  Gender and Sexual Politics in Modern Europe

 

 

X

SWAG 328 – Science and Sexuality

 

 

X

SWAG 347/BLST 347 – Race, Sex, and Gender in the U.S. Military

X

 

X

Hampshire College

CSI 208 – Queer Feelings:  The Emotional and Affective Life of Gender, Sexuality and Race

 

 

X

CSI 241 – Renaissance Bodies:  Sex, Art, Religion, Medicine

 

 

X

CSI 252 – Creating Families:  Law, Culture and Technology

 

 

X

HACU 177 – The Body in Contemporary Philosophy

 

 

X

HACU 188 – The Regulation of Race, Sex, and Disability in the US

 

 

X

Mount Holyoke College

GNDST 204LF/SPAN 230LF – Spanish Women Through Literature and Film

 

X

 

GNDST 204LT/LATST 212/ENGL 218LT – Introduction to Latina/o Literatures

X

 

 

GNDST 206GS/ASIAN 211GS/HIST 239GS – Gender and Sexuality in East Asia

 

X

 

GNDST 221QF – Feminist and Queer Theory

 

 

X

GNDST 333FM/LATST 350FM – Latina Feminism

X

X

 

GNDST 333RA – Queering Race, Racing Queer

 

 

X

GNDST 333RN/ANTHR 316RN – Race/Nation/Gender:  Feminist Studies of Scientific, Medical and “Patient Mobility”

 

 

X

Smith College

AFR 366 – Classic Black Women’s Texts 

X

 

 

EAL 235 – Class, Gender and Material Culture in Late Imperial China

 

X

 

EAL 244 – Japanese Women’s Writing

 

X

 

GOV 325 – Gender and Politics in Global Perspective

 

X

 

GOV 366 – The Politics of Heterosexuality

 

 

X

HST 259 – Femininities, Masculinities and Sexualities in Africa

 

 

X

LAS 301 – Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin America

 

X

X

REL 277 – South Asian Masculinities

 

 

X

SOC 253 – Sociology of Sexuality:  Institutions, Identities and Cultures

 

 

X

SPN 230 – Female Visions of Mexico

 

X

 

SPN 373 – Contesting Feminisms:  Transnational and Indigenous Voices Rethinking Latin American Feminisms

 

X

 

AFROAM 252 – Afro-American Image in American Writing
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Carlyn Ferrari

Examination of a representative sampling of poetry, prose and/or drama by American writers -- black and white, male and female -- depicting African-American characters and issues related directly to the lives of African Americans.  Texts chosen from the works of such authors as Jefferson, Poe, Stowe, Melville, Douglass, Delany, Dunbar, Eliot, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Styron, Baraka, and Morrison.  We will analyze and interpret material in light of issues of race, gender, class, politics, historical time frame, and artistic aesthetic, in order to characterize the depictions of African-Americans in the works, and to understand what those depictions reflect about individual writers, about segments of American society, and about American society as a whole.


AFROAM – 297F – Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Nneka Dennie

This course will survey the historical, political, economic and socio-cultural realities that Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean have faced and continue to face. A variety of readings by and about Black women will highlight the ways in which race, class, and gender combine to operate in the lives of Black women. Special attention will be paid to Black women as laborers, Black women as political activists, and the various ways in which Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean experience race and gender.


AFROAM 390E – Race, Ethnicity and Gender in U.S. History

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Crystal Webster

Examination of situations which illuminate intersection of race, ethnicity, and gender in antebellum U.S.: contact and interaction between American Indians, African-Americans and European-Americans in colonial New England; relationship between white and black women, both slave and free, in the South; and the development of racist ideologies and behavior in the white working classes.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


AFROAM 391B – Modern Afro-American Novelists

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Karla Zelaya

Examine novels written by African American women from the Harlem Renaissance to the present.  The course will engage a simple, but fundamental issue: is there such a thing as modern African American women's literature?  If so, how might we define it? Some of the ways that we come at this issue will be from the point of genre (e.g., the novel of manners, the slave narrative, the sentimental novel, the gothic romance, the historical novel, and so on.), audience reception, and the relation of the novels to popular culture.  Historical contexts of the novels and the impact of various artistic, intellectual, and social movements (e.g., the Civil Rights, Black Power/Arts, First and Second Wave Feminism, and Gay Liberation) on the formal and thematic choices of the authors studied will also be considered.


AFROAM 392C – Songbirds, Bluewsomen, Soulwomen

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Evelyn Harris

The focus for this course is the cultural, political, and social issues found in the music and history of African American women performers. The primary emphasis in the course will be on African American women in Jazz, Blues, and Soul/R&B, but students also will study African American women composers as well as Spiritual-Gospel and Opera performers.


AFROM 491C – Cuba:  Social History of Race, Class & Gender

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Karen Morrison

This course is an advance undergraduate reading seminar that explores the social relations and everyday experiences of Cubans under the various political states under which they have lived - Spanish colonialism, capitalist republicanism, and revolutionary socialism. As we consider issues of social identity, the quest for social justice, and national sovereignty, we will keep the concepts of race, class, and gender centered. Two questions frame the course. What were the social conditions in which the Cuban Revolution emerged, and how have these conditions been transformed since 1959?


AFROM 691D – Black Women in the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Traci Parker

Women initiated, organized, and sustained the Civil Rights Movement. Not only did women activists far outnumber men, but they also emerged as leaders in working-class and poor neighborhoods more often than men. This course will investigate women's diverse visions of and involvement in social justice using historical texts, film, television, and music. Taking the long civil rights movement approach, it will consider middle-class and working-class activism towards racial, gender, and economic justice in the early twentieth century, the labor-oriented civil rights movement of the 1930s and 1940s, and the modern Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements. Special attention will be paid to the relationships between black and white women and the impact of the movement on women?s status and identity. Notable activists like Mary Church Terrell, Ella Baker, Florynce Kennedy, Lena Horne, and Nina Simone, as well as those who remain unnamed in the historical record, will be critical to this investigation.


ANTHRO 205 – Inequality and Oppression

Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00
Discussions Thursday  10:00, 11:30, 1:00, 4:00 and Friday 9:05, 10:10, 11:15, 12:20
Milena Marchesi

The roots of racism and sexism and the issues they raise. The cultural, biological, and social contexts of race and gender and examination of biological variation, genetic determinism, human adaptation, and the bases of human behavior.


ANTHRO 297O – Gender in Hip Hop Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Whitney Battle-Baptiste

See department for description.


COMM 271 – Humor in Society

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life, especially as it negotiates issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. This course also introduces students to the burgeoning field of humor studies. Topics include the different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and creativity, the political use of humor, the role of humor in maintaining personal and social identity, and the social aspects of laughter. Although the focus lies on contemporary humor in U.S. American society and media, the course also examines different cultural perspectives on the humorous. (GenEd SB, U)  Open to Freshmen and Sophomore COMM majors only.  25 Seats reserved for Commonwealth College Honors Students.  This course was formerly numbered COMM 297C:  If you have taken COMM 297C you cannot take this course.


COMM 290AH – Media, Public Opinion and LGBT Rights

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Seth Goldman

LGBT rights continue to be one of the most contentious issues in American politics. Why is this so? In this course, we will critically examine social science research that has tried to answer these questions. A key emphasis in this class is on the tole of mass media, and the role that it plays in public opinion change.


COMM 494GI – Media and Construction of Gender

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Lynn Phillips

This Communication course draws on research and theory in communication, psychology, sociology, gender and cultural studies, education, and anthropology to examine how various forms of media shape our understandings of ourselves and others as gendered beings. We will discuss how media messages not only influence our behaviors, but also permeate our very senses of who we are from early childhood. Through a critical examination of fairy tales, text books, advertisements, magazines, television, movies, and music, students will explore the meanings and impacts of gendered messages as they weave with cultural discourses about race, class, sexuality, disability, age, and culture.  COMM Seniors only.  COMM 121 and COMM 288 are strongly recommended before taking this course.  Formerly numbered COMM 491A.  If you have taken COMM 491A, you cannot take this course.  This course serves as an Integrative Experience (IE) requirement for BA-COMM majors.


COMP-LIT 592A – Medieval Women Writers

Monday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Jessica Barr

Selected medieval women writers from the point of view of current theoretical perspectives. Writers include Heloise, Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Mechthild of Magdeburg, Marguerite Porete, Margery Kempe, and others. Themes to be discussed include love and desire in women's writing; representations of women in medieval literature and philosophy; gendered representations of sanctity; and critical approaches derived from Marxist and feminist theory.

ECON 348 – The Political Economy of Women
Tuesday, Thursday 10:00-11:15 a.m.
Lisa Saunders

A critical review of neoclassical, Marxist, and feminist economic theories pertaining to inequality between men and women in both the family and the firm.


EDUC 190A – Education at the Movies (Education and Film) (SB)

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kysa Nygreen

Topic:  Media Representations of Race, Class and Gender inEducation.  This course systematically examines Hollywood representations of teaching and schooling.  It uses two key disciplinary frameworks – sociology of education, and critical media studies – to analyze film as both a product and producer of American society and culture.  Through critical engagement with Hollywood films about education, student learn to identify dominant educational ideologies, and conduct media analysis based on race, class, gender, and sexuality. 


EDUC 392E – Social Issues Workshop:  Sexism

TBA
Molly Keehn

Workshop addresses the dynamics of sexism on personal and institutional levels. All students registered for EDUC 392 MUST attend a mandatory First Night Orientation on, February 3rd, 5:30 to 8:00 pm, location: TBA, and one WKND, 9am-5pm, location: TBA.   Sexism:  April 2-3 Students who wish to add 2 or more sections please contact us at educ392umass@gmail.com for other questions write to the same email address.


ENGLISH 115 – American Experience

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00
Rebecca Maillet

In this course we will read a variety of texts by LGBTQ authors. We will explore the ways in which these authors respond to the dominance of capitalism, sexism, white supremacy, and heteropatriarchy within American culture. Our thinking and reading in this course will allow us gain an awareness not only of large social constructs (such as race, class, and gender), but also allow us a window into the lived realities of people made marginal by/within American culture. Our reading will cover a variety of genres (film, essay, fiction, memoir, and poetry), and will likely include works from the following authors: Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Barbara Smith, Susan Sontag, Natalie Diaz, Maggie Nelson, Thomas Page McBee, Dorothy Allison, Eileen Myles, Luis Negron, Meg Day, and Dark Matter. (Gen.Ed. AL, U)


ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture

Monday, Wednesday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
Discussions  Friday  9:05, 11:15, 1:25, 
Caroline Yang

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)


ENGLISH 144 – World Literature in English – South African Literature and the Dream of Peace

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:05-9:55 a.m.
Joy Jansen

This course is a survey of a particular slice of world literature in English, post-Apartheid South African literature and film. In the aftermath of Apartheid post-1994, South African literature has tangled with ideas about what kind of future is possible. Labelling itself as the “Rainbow Nation,” South African politicians, activists, and artists (literary, visual, musical) have sought to create a democratic vision of South Africa that celebrates differences of race, culture, gender, and sexual orientation. Using 1994 as our moment of departure, this course will examine the “future” of South Africa as told through post-Apartheid South African fiction and film. Acknowledging that there are many ways to imagine the future, this course examines how portrayals of race, of gender and sexuality, and of the nation serve to construct and disrupt ideas about the future.


ENGLISH 302 – Studies in Textuality & New Media

Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
TreaAndrea Russworm

This class will have a special topic focus on race, gender, and new media. We will study a variety of new media forms, including video games, online web series, blogs, podcasts, and YouTube videos. All of our case studies and weekly lesson plans will either feature content produced and created by women artists and fans or deal explicitly with questions about gender representation---both masculinity and femininity. Throughout the term, some questions we will explore include: Does misogyny persist in new media and digital cultures? While art games may tend to convey more complex messages about gender and sexuality, what can we say about the industry, mainstream video games, and the dominant image of gamers as young and male? Is there anything productive or interesting about the dominance of normative masculinity in digital spaces? Can the web series format compete with television in any significant way? By the end of the semester, all students in the class will conduct interviews of new media producers and help archive this work on a course website.


ECE 297QL – Queer Lights

Wednesday 4:00-5:00 p.m. 
Genny Beemyn, David McLaughlin

“Queer Lights” will cast light on lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, and asexual (LGBTQA) topics while the students in the class literally cast light—building LGBTQA-themed electronic light displays.  An engineering professor will teach the students how to create and program the displays, and the director of the Stonewall Center will lead the students in discussions about LGBTQA issues in the news and in their own lives.  Some of the topics to be covered include the intersections of racial and LGBTQA identities, the campus climate for LGBTQA students, and the legal and political rights of LGBTQA people today. This seminar will meet weekly in the Student Union Craft Center.


FRENCHST 280 – Love and Sex in French Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Patrick Mensah

This course offers a broad historical overview of the ways in which love and erotic behavior in French culture have been represented and understood in the arts, especially in Literature and, more recently, in film, from the middle ages to the twentieth century. (Gen.Ed. AL)


HISTORY 365H/697LG – U.S. LGBT and Queer History

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Julio Capo

This honors general education course explores how queer individuals and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities have influenced the social, cultural, economic, and political landscape in United States history. Topics include sodomy charges, cross-dressing, industrialization, feminism, the construction of the homo/heterosexual binary, the "pansy" craze, the homophile, gay liberation, and gay rights movements, HIV/AIDS, immigration, and the on-going debate concerning same-sex marriage. This four-credit course fulfills both "HS" (i.e., Historical Studies) and "U" (i.e., Diversity: United States) general education requirements.


HISTORY 389 – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-1:50 p.m.
Discussions Friday  9:05, 10:10,  11:15, 12:20, 1:25 
Laura Lovett

Explores the relationship of women to the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American society from 1890 to the present. Examines women's paid and unpaid labor, family life and sexuality, feminist movements and women's consciousness; emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and sexual choice have affected women's historical experience. Sophomore level and above.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


HISTORY 393I – Indigenous Women of North America

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alice Nash

See department for description.


HISTORY 397LEH – Liberation or Equality?:  History of LGBT Rights Law

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

The last fifteen years have seen incredible legal victories for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LBGT) people in the United States, from the decriminalization of same sex sexual activity to gay marriage.  And yet, in most states, it remains legal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in employment, housing, and public accommodations and LGBT people still experience violence in their families, on the streets, and in schools.  This course will examine the history of LGBT people in the United States through the lens of the law.  We will explore a host of legal issues facing LGBT people in the last fifty years, such as sodomy laws, employment discrimination, school bullying, health law issues, particularly those related to HIV/AIDS and transgender health care, and family law issues, such as child custody, adoption, and marriage.  Some questions we might consider include:   When and why have LGBT people turned to the courts or legislatures for redress of legal grievances and to what success?  What claims have LGBT people made for legal protection and how has it mattered whether these claims have been based on equality, liberty, or privacy arguments?  In what ways has the use of "the law" by the LGBT movement to achieve social justice been different from and similar to other "rights" movements, such as the civil rights movement, the women?s rights movement, and the disability rights movement?  What conflicts have arisen over legal goals and strategies between the LGBT "movement" and LGBT people?   What role have lawyers historically played in advancing (or constraining) the goals of the LGBT movement and how effective has litigation been in securing these rights?  Does (or will) legal equality for LGBT people mean justice or liberation for LGBT people?  How has the lived legal experience of LGBT people differed on the basis of other social and legal categories, such as sex, gender, race, class, ability, or immigration or incarceration status?  What new legal issues are on the horizon for the LGBT movement, particularly involving trans and intersexed people?


HISTORY 397MJ – The Woman in Modern Japan

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Garrett Washington

In this course students will learn about the history of women in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Japan. We will examine the constantly shifting ways in which Japanese society defined womanhood as well as the actual ideas and actions of Japanese women. This course in gender history course will introduce students to the legal, political, intellectual, social, and cultural developments that have shaped the place of women within Japan. The course will explore these themes through scholarly secondary sources and a variety of primary sources.


HISTORY 397REH/697RE – Race, Sex and Empire:  Britain and India

Tuesday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Priyanka Srivastava

This course explores how notions of racial hierarchies as well as myths and prejudices about the sexual practices of colonized people influenced the history and politics of British Empire in India from the late eighteenth to early twentieth century. Students will analyze key scholarly perspectives on the following themes: the forms of colonial knowledge, theories of Aryanism, functions of race and masculinity in the legitimation of empire, regulation of sexual behavior and prostitution, and the roles of colonial institutions, medical practices, popular discourses, and cultural artifacts in producing racial and sexual stereotypes and justifying the distinction between the colonizers and the colonized.


HISTORY 450 – Junior Year Writing Seminar in History

Thursday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

The topic, Sex and the Supreme Court, focuses on the U.S. Supreme Court and its rulings regarding sexuality.  We will examine several hot button issues the Supreme Court has weighed in on, such as pornography/obscenity, sodomy, reproduction (sterilization/contraception/abortion), marriage (polygamous/interracial/same sex), sexual assault on college campuses, and sex education in public schools.  We will consider how the Court and advocates framed these issues, used (or misused) historical evidence, and how the argument and/or evidence changed depending on the audience (i.e. the Court or the general public).  Students will write several short papers, such as a letter to the editor, opinion column (op-ed), reading response essay, blog entry and/or case summary, and a 15-20 page research paper (a paper with an argument supported by evidence) on a topic of their choosing related to sex and the law.  Finally, students will engage in a peer review process during the drafting of their final papers and will give a presentation about their paper to the class.


HISTORY 45 – Junior Year Writing Seminar in History

Tuesday  2:30-5:00
Joyce Berkman

History of Reproductive Rights and Justice in the United States: This Junior Seminar, although primarily focused on the history of reproductive rights and justice in the United States, is open to student research and writing on the related history in other countries. The course is organized into two parts. Prior to spring break, students will read widely in reproductive rights and justice theory and history since the colonial era.  An essay, ca. 10-15 pages, based upon assigned readings, lectures and class discussion will climax this first half of the semester. During the weeks after spring break, the seminar turns into a workshop,  which feature student presentation of the first drafts of their term paper as well as study of research and writing techniques.  The term paper builds on the readings of the first half of the semester along with research undertaken soon after spring break. The final draft of the paper will be due a week after the last day of the Seminar.


ITALIAN 497DF/597DF – The Divas:  Female Icons in Italian Cinema

Tuesday  2:30-5:15 p.m. (with screenings)
Andrea Malaguti

The course explores the social role and meaning of some of the most important actresses of post-WWII Italian cinema (Anna Magnani, Sofia Loren, and Monica Vitti, among others) as both metamorphic representatives and problematic probes of a rapidly modernizing society, and proposes a model of the female figure as “the active face of the crisis” (Giorgio Tinazzi).  Conducted in English.


JAPANESE 391/591M - Queer Japan in Literature and Culture

Tuesday, Thursday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Stephen Miller

Queer Japan begins in premodern history, becomes predominant in early modern history, fades at the end of the nineteenth century, and blossoms in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Come learn about queer Buddhist priests, salacious townsmen and samurai in Tokugawa Japan, the sexual conflicts of the early 20th c., and the burgeoning pride of the 20th and 21st centuries. Some knowledge of Japan is encouraged, but not required. Open to students seeking the certificate in Queer and Sexuality Studies.


JUDAISM 383/WOMENSST 391D – Women, Gender, Judaism

Wednesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Susan Shapiro

This course focuses on the shifting historical constructions (from biblical to contemporary times) of women's and men's gender roles and in Judaism and their cultural and social consequences.


MANAGMNT 391B – Women and Men in Organizations

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Linda Smircich

This course explores the relevance and consequence of gender organizations, and management.  As a central feature around which social life is organized, gender has implications for women, men, and how we work. Among the topics included: the gender gap; gender and leadership; gender and power; gender and entrepreneurship; men, management and masculinity, and debates about  the "feminine advantage," mothers, fathers and organizations; work/life "balance"; the "opt out" phenomenon, "wanting to have it all" and "leaning in."  Other topics will be included based on students' interests.  The course will be run in seminar style, with the expectation that students will engage actively and thoughtfully with the material and with one another.  Reading materials will be drawn from the scholarly literature and the popular press. This course is open to Juniors & Seniors with majors in the Isenberg School of Management.  Prerequisite: MANAGMNT 301


POLSCI 291U – UMass Women in Leadership

Tuesday  4:30-7:00 p.m.
Michelle Goncalves

UMass Women into Leadership (UWiL) is a series of hands-on workshops designed to educate participants on the existence and causes of gender disparities in public service, to provide leadership training to prepare participants to enter public service careers, and to offer mentoring and networking programs to help launch public service careers.


POLSCI 394BI – The Body Politic

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Diane Curtis

An interdisciplinary exploration of how American political and legal power is exercised upon and through the human body. Particular attention will be paid to the regulation and physical control of bodies, as well as the use of bodies in protest and resistance to state power, including through political art. While a range of topics and movements fall within this general description, we will examine most closely the politics of AIDS and reproductive health in the United States.  Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.


POLSCI 395F - Women in Politics

Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

Women have made tremendous gains in every aspect of social, economic and political life in the United States, particularly since the second wave of the women's movement in the 1960s.  Yet, women's progress in terms of achieving elected office has reached a puzzling plateau since the 1990s.  We will examine the course of women's movements towards achieving political incorporation in the United States. We consider the debate over why women's political progress has stagnated and we consider the impact of the gender imbalance in American electoral politics - to what extent do these disparities matter? We begin by exploring women's suffrage campaigns and voting behavior in the period immediately following their achievement of the right to vote and beyond. We then turn to the relationship between women and party politics before discussing the challenges women face as candidates in American politics. We will focus on understanding why women remain underrepresented as legislators. We then consider the extent to which women's participation in campaigns and elections makes a substantive difference in policy making.


PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
John Bickford

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health.  Senior Psychology majors only.  Prerequisite PSYCH 241. 


PUBHLTH 497W – Global Perspective on Women’s Health

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson

In this seminar, students will discuss a variety of issues affecting women's health around the world. Topics include maternal mortality, family planning, infectious disease, sex trafficking, and gender-based violence.


SOC 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
TBA

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOC 222 – The Family

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:20
Discussions Friday 9:05, 10:10, 11:15, 12:20, 1:25, 2:30
Naomi Gerstel

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOCIOL 283 – Gender & Society

Monday, Wednesday  5:30-6:45 p.m.
Noa Milman

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.


SOCIOL 381 – Racism at Work

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Enobong Branch

This course emphasizes how race/ethnicity and gender affect work, primarily in the contemporary United States. Though we will focus on women and men of color and white women as targets of work inequality, we will also discuss the dynamics of masculinity and white privilege. A variety of methods from qualitative to quantitative purely theoretical will be utilized.


SOC 387 – Sexuality and Society

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
TBA

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


STOCKSCH 297W – Herbal Approaches to Women’s Health

Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Brittany Nicerkson, Lykle Craker

Use of medicinal herbs and foods for health and well being through all stages of a woman's life. Introduction to basic medicine making, anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system.

AFROAM 118 – Survey of Afro-American Literature II

Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Discussions Friday 10:10, 11:15
James Smethurst

Introductory level survey of Afro-American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, including DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Walker, Morrison, Baraka and Lorde. (Gen Ed, AL U)


AFROAM 197B – Taste of Honey:  Black Film Since the 1950’s, Part 2

Thursday  6:00-8:30 p.m.
John Bracey

See department for description.


AFROAM 252 – Afro-American Image in American Writing

Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Carlyn Ferrari

Examination of a representative sampling of poetry, prose and/or drama by American writers -- black and white, male and female -- depicting African-American characters and issues related directly to the lives of African Americans.  Texts chosen from the works of such authors as Jefferson, Poe, Stowe, Melville, Douglass, Delany, Dunbar, Eliot, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, Styron, Baraka, and Morrison.  We will analyze and interpret material in light of issues of race, gender, class, politics, historical time frame, and artistic aesthetic, in order to characterize the depictions of African-Americans in the works, and to understand what those depictions reflect about individual writers, about segments of American society, and about American society as a whole.


AFROAM 254 – Introduction to African Studies

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Karen Morrison

Introduction to Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective. The chronological sequence from pre-history to contemporary times. Political development and processes, the arts, ethnography, social structures, and economies.  (Gen.Ed. HS, G)


ANTHRO 297AH – Cultural Anthropology and Development in Africa

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Alfred Babo

In this course several broad Africa-based themes will be treated including themes in African Studies, Issues in Education, African Religion and Systems of Thought, Governance, Democracy and Political Conflict, African Literature, Economic Development, Health and Society, and Youth and Popular Culture, Gender and LGBT. The aim of the course is to bring and discuss a cultural anthropology perspective of these issues.


ANTHRO 397LA – Health in Latin America

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Tom Leatherman

This course is about health and health systems in Latin America and the ways they are embedded in history, culture and political economy.  These themes will be explored through specific case studies from the Peruvian Andes, the Yucatan of Mexico, and from Latinos in the US.  The course introduces key concepts and approaches in Medical Anthropology such as the political-economy of health, biocultural approaches, medical pluralism, and social suffering; and explores indigenous health concepts as well as biomedical and public health practice.  We begin with an historical overview of health and health systems and the devastation of the conquest and colonialism in Peru, Mexico and beyond.  We then discuss local systems of health and healing along side biomedical thought and practice, and how the patterns of health have changed along with shifts in culture, economy, and politics.  Some of the topics and/or case studies include:  indigenous  and biomedical health systems; biocultural health interactions; medical pluralism; inequalities and health in the Andes, tourism and health in the Yucatan; gender, health, reproduction and reproductive politics; the nutrition transition in Mexico; immigrant health in the US. 


ANTHRO 297AH – Cultural Anthropology and Development in Africa

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Alfred Babo

In this course several broad Africa-based themes will be treated including themes in African Studies, Issues in Education, African Religion and Systems of Thought, Governance, Democracy and Political Conflict, African Literature, Economic Development, Health and Society, and Youth and Popular Culture, Gender and LGBT. The aim of the course is to bring and discuss a cultural anthropology perspective of these issues.


ANTHRO 370 – Contemporary Issues for North American Indians

Thursday  2:30-5:15 p.m.
Jean Forward

Study and application of anthropological theory to contemporary problems of North American Indians in the Northeast, including an analysis of their environmental, economic, political, social, and religious variables involved in gaining a holistic perspective of contemporary indigenous problems.  (Gen.Ed. U)


ANTHRO 397FC – Italy:  Facism to Fashion

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Elizabeth Krause

See department for description.


ANTHRO 507 – Anthropology of Violence

Tuesday  2:30-5:15 p.m.
TBA

The Anthropology of Violence is a comprehensive graduate level seminar on the issues of interpersonal and institutional forms of violence as seen from an anthropological perspective. It is required coursework for all students affiliated with the VCL. The goal of the course is for students to explore the theoretical framework of violence studies in terms of structure, order, repetitive behavior, predictability, and institutionalization. Topics include the biological basis of aggression; identity politics of gender, race, class, and ethnicity; nationalism; torture; state violence; genocide; human rights; and truth and reconciliation efforts. The study of violence requires students to understand the transformative powers of its use in social relations and cultural practices. To accomplish this, students are tasked with writing a scholarly paper based on a current research project that explores violence through human experience. By the end of the course, students will have acquired a sense of violence’s richness, complexity, and stabilizing as well as destabilizing force.


ANTHRO 597CR – Critical Race Theory

Tuesday  10:00-12:45 p.m.
Amanda Johnson

See department for description.


CHINESE 241 – Contemporary Chinese Literature

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Enhua Zhang

The development of modern China as seen through its literature covering the period 1915-1989. Exploration of the relationship between writing and political change, the role of dissident writers, and the politics of gender in texts from mainland China and Taiwan. All readings are in English translation. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)


CLASSICS 330 – Witchcraft and Magic

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Debbie Felton

Influence of witchcraft and magic on the ancient Greeks and Romans in the context of their social, political, and religious beliefs.  The relationship between ritual magic and religion,  with emphasis on the nature of witchcraft and the psychology of magic.  Recommended prerequisite: Classics 100, 102, or 224.


COMM 397PR – Performance/Politics of Race

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Kimberlee Perez

This course looks at the ways race, racial identities, and interracial relations are formed through and by communication practices in present-day U.S. America. Though focusing on U.S. America in the current  historical moment, the course takes into account the ways history as well  as the transnational flows of people and capital inform and define conversations about race and racial identities. Race will be discussed as intersectional, taking into account the ways race is understood and  performed in relation to gender, sexuality, class, and nation. The course will focus on the performance and communications of race, ranging from everyday interactions, personal narratives and storytelling, intra- and inter-racial dialogue, and staged performances.


COMM 491M – Civil Rights and Film

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 p.m.
Demetria Shabazz

See department for description.


COMM 494AB – Hollywood Film, Diversity & Adaption

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Demetria Shabazz

This course aims to inspire the development of a critical vocabulary for analysis of the formal conventions of film, especially as they bear on literary discourse. In addition, this course will focus on cinematic and literary works that articulate or express specific notions of American identity in terms of race, class, and gender. This class will look specifically at how the film industry negotiates specific literary narratives about identity within American society as a means of adapting the texts to the big screen. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Comm majors.  This course was formerly numbered COMM 497AB.  If you have already taken COMM 497AB you cannot take this course. 


COMP-LIT 231 – Comedy

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m. – Daniel Nevarez Araujo
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m. – Andres Wilson

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.  GenEd (AL)


COMP-LIT 320H – Irish Writers and Culture Context

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Patricia Gorman

In this class, we read and discuss classic Irish short stories, contemporary drama, and the experimental modern and contemporary novel.  We screen award-winning films and listen to and discuss poetry. Topics represented in these works include: theology, myth, nationalism, sexual politics, music and art.  Students may choose their area of concentration.  Course content originates in Irish culture and provides the opportunity comparative, global inquiry.  Gen Ed (AL)


COMPLIT 391SF – International SciFi Cinema

Tuesday  7:00-10:00
N. Couch

This course provides an introduction to science fiction cinema from the end of the nineteenth century to today. Beginning with the experiments of the Melies Brothers and the importance of German Expressionist films like Fritz Lang's Metropolis, the course considers technological prognostication from Destination Moon to 2001: A Space Odyssey, adventure and science fiction in films like Forbidden Planet and Star Wars, and the dystopian imagination from Invasion of the Body Snatchers to District 9. The course will also highlight the roles of women writers and directors from Thea von Harbou to Kathryn Bigelow, and technological cinematic advances from matte painting and process shots to CGI.


ECON 144H – Political Economy of Racism (SB, U)

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Lisa Saunders

Introductory economic analysis of inequality by race.  A range of topics: from colonialism, slavery and Jim Crow to wealth, income and earnings inequality, immigration reform and environmental racism today. Econ 103 or 104 recommended but not required.


EDUC 115 – Embracing Diversity

Tuesday  11:30-2:15 pm.
Thursday  11:30-2:15 p.m.
Benita Barnes

This course is about cultural diversity in the University community and how we can better understand ourselves and others through an appreciation of college education as a cultural experience, with its own unique set of rules, biases, and expectations.  The course is designed for first year students. (Gen.Ed. I, U)


EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-6:30
Antonio Martinez

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression.  Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.  (Gen.Ed. I, U)


EDUC 229 – International Education

Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sangeeta Kamat

This course is designed to introduce students to the role of culture in education.  After exploring the theoretical basis of culture, and its relationship to education, students will be exposed to a range of cultural perspectives from Africa, Asia and Latin America.  (Gen.Ed. SB, G)


EDUC 291E – Theatre for Social Change

Tuesday  7:00-9:30 p.m.
Michael Dodge

"Shaha:  The Storytellers", a diversity peer education troupe is a theatre-based program that is educational, entertaining, and thought-provoking.  Shaha members perform short scenarios touching on issues of social justice and oppression that many of us are faced with in our day-to-day lives.


EDUC 392B – Racism Global Context

TBA
Molly Keehn, Ximena Zuniga

This workshop addresses the dynamics of racism in specific institutional and global contexts. For enrollment procedures and instructor's consent to register, please contact Eun Y. Lee at cmassdialogues@gmail.com.


ENGLISH 205 – Introduction to Post-colonial Studies

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Mazen Naous

This course surveys literatures written in English from South Asia, Africa and the Caribbean.  In doing so it asks what unites the diverse literatures gathered under the rubric "postcolonial".  Is postcolonial simply a descriptive category, or does it suggest an oppositional or troubled stance towards colonialism and modernity?  To consider this question we will take up major issues and debates within postcolonial studies, namely: nationalism and nativism, subalternity, feminism, development, and globalization.  Throughout we will be concerned with questions of identity formation, representation, and literary form.


ENGLISH 300 – Junior Year Writing – Black Memoir

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Emily Lordi

Ever since the slave narratives, African American writers have consistently chosen the genre of memoir. They have used this literary form to communicate realities that the dominant culture has ignored or willfully suppressed, and to create black community through artful testimony to shared experience. This course will examine classic works of African American autobiography from the 19th to the 21st century. Our primary readings will include slave narratives by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs; autobiographical essays by W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and James Baldwin; and longer memoirs by Richard Wright, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, and Barack Obama.


ENGLISH 349 – 19th Century British Fiction

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Suzanne Daly

When novels circulate through a culture, what exactly is circulating, in, with, or through them? This class is organized around the question of why certain plots, literary styles, genres, themes, ideas, or ways of understanding the world became ubiquitous in novels at different moments in the nineteenth century. Topics: gender and the marriage plot; domestic and imperial fiction; capitalism and socialism; realist and sensation novels; labor and social class; family and childhood; travel and worldliness; death and inheritance. Texts (available at Amherst Books) may include Charlotte Brontë, Villette; Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton; Rudyard Kipling, Kim. Assignments will include response papers, reading quizzes, and two researched critical essays. 


ENGLISH 355 – Creative Writing

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Mecca Sullivan

Students should submit one complete story and a brief personal statement (list and briefly discuss your reading preferences, your favorite writers and books), along with your contact information, to John Hennessy at jjhennes@english.umass.edu.  Application deadline is November 20th.  Students will be notified by December 15th of their status.  Registration after this date is possible, but priority will be given to students who meet the November 20th deadline.   Open to English majors only. Prerequisite: English 354 or equivalent. Registration by instructor permission only.


ENGLISH 392D – Documentary and Social Activism

Monday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Jenny Spencer

In this course, students explore the theory and practice of contemporary documentary drama as a form of social activism. “Fact-based” theatre is a genre that relies on primary source material such as legal documents, eye witness accounts, testimony, photographs, newspaper articles, and archival material in the creation of a work designed to ferret out “the truth” and/or to promote social change.  Students will study historical examples of the form, from the Living Newspaper to The Exonerated, alongside the work of playwrights who have seriously influenced the form, such as Anna Deveare Smith.  In addition to reading and discussing the aesethic, ethical, and political choices made by the authors of documentary theatre, students will also be practicing various documentary techniques while working on a final collaborative project to present on an event or issue of their choosing.  This course is open to anyone interested in creative writing, current events, dramatic literature, or political action. 


GERMAN 304 – From Berlin to Hollywood

Tuesday, Thursday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Barton Byg

Conducted in English - From the horror and science fiction classics of Expressionism (Caligari, Nosferatu, Metropolis) to contemporary global successes (Oscar winner The Lives of Others), films from Germany have had great international influence, particularly on popular culture in the U.S. This survey begins with the classics of German silent cinema, including the great artists who emigrated to Hollywood and contributed to its success (Lang, Dietrich, Murnau, Sirk, Wilder etc.). Then the successors to the "golden age" will be discussed: Nazi cinema, post-war films in the divided Germany, and the "second Americanization" of Germany paving the way for the role of a united Germany (and a united Europe) in today's international media. Other topics will include Expressionism (from graphic art to animation); documentary; experimental and avant-garde film. A special focus of 2016 will be the careers of key women in German film, especially those who began in the silent cinema and extended into the post-WWII era (Herta Thiele, Valeska Gert, Greta Garbo, Asta Nielsen, Leni Riefenstahl, Marlene Dietrich).


GERMAN 397C - Crime & Criminals in Modern German Culture

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20-1:10 p.m.
Sara Jackson

In this course we will examine representations of crime and criminals in German culture in the 19th and 20th centuries through historiography, literature, painting, and film, as well as changing legal codes, texts from the criminal sciences, feminist writing and other cultural documents related to criminality. Conducted in English. 3 credits.


HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Daniel Chard

Few questions in American history remain as contentious as the meaning of the 1960s. Observers agree that it was a very important time, but they are deeply divided as to whether it ushered in a needed series of social changes, or whether the Sixties were a period marked mainly by excess, chaos, and self-indulgence. There is not even agreement about when the Sixties began and ended. This course will build on the concept of the "Long Sixties," a period stretching from roughly 1954 to 1975. It will focus on topics that relate to struggles for social change: the civil rights movement, the peace movement, gender and sexuality, alternative lifestyles, identity politics, the counterculture, cultural production, and debates over multiculturalism. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


HISTORY 242H – The American Family

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Martha Yoder

An historical, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of families in America.  We will examine the histories of various groups, exploring how these experiences have resulted in different family dynamics.  We will then take up the question of the continuing relevance of race, ethnicity, and social class to families in America today and to the discussion of family in American politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


HISTORY 397PR – Power and Resistance in Latin America

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Kevin Young

Latin American history is filled with people taking collective action to shape their societies. This course surveys the history of Latin American and Caribbean social movements from the late nineteenth century to the present day, seeking to identify key patterns and lessons in the process. Why have ordinary Latin Americans joined social movements, often at high personal risk? How and when have those movements achieved their goals? What factors have influenced the forms and strategies that movements adopt? Some of the case studies will  include struggles to abolish slavery in Cuba, labor movements in twentieth-century Chile and Brazil, peasant/indigenous movements in Mexico and the Andes, feminist and LGBT struggles in El Salvador, mobilization against military dictatorship in Argentina in the 1970s, the transnational campaigns against U.S. intervention in Central America in the 1980s, and struggles in defense of natural resources. We will also consider some of the groups who have mobilized in opposition to these movements. Requirements will include biweekly response papers, several quizzes, an in-class final exam, and active class participation. Some prior knowledge of modern Latin America is recommended but not required.


HONORS 321H – Violence in American Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Ventura Perez

This course will explore the complex social and cultural interactions that can lead to violence. We will begin by examining various theories of human violence from a number of disciplines: anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will then survey different cultural attitudes towards violence beginning with several prehistoric sites from the American Southwest and northern Mexico. Next, the course will consider the historical roots of American violence starting with the European invasion of North America. Specific instances of violence in American history will also be considered, including the attempted genocide of American Indians, the enslavement of African Americans, and the American Civil War. The second half of the course will focus on a number of contemporary issues of American violence including race violence, hate crimes, violence against women, family violence, gang violence, and the violence in contemporary art and film. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


HONORS 322H – Criminal Law and Justice in the U.S.

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a..m.
Kathleen Brown-Perez

Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America. This course begins with an introduction to the role of the Constitution in criminal law, including due process, equal protection, and the Bill of Rights. It then introduces the students to substantive criminal law, including basic stages of the criminal process, principles underlying the definition of crime such as the requirements of actus reus and mens rea, causation, attempt, complicity, and conspiracy. Substantive offenses covered include homicidal offenses, other offenses against persons, property crimes, white collar and organized crime, vice crimes, and offenses against public health and the environment. Also examined is criminal responsibility and defenses. This course goes on to highlight changes in criminal behavior and theories of punishment, including the different ways that Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. This course addresses the generally ignored issue of crime and criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country. The final weeks of the semester address the role that race, ethnicity, sex, and socioeconomic status play in the criminal justice system outside of Indian Country. This discussion includes the War on Drugs, mandatory minimum sentencing, and private, for-profit prisons. No prerequisites. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


JOURNAL 497J – Social Justice Journalism

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-12:00 p.m.
Razvan Sibii

This is an explanatory journalism class with an emphasis on the intractable structural issues confronting contemporary American society. Each iteration of the course will focus on one such issue (e.g., immigration, mass incarceration, gender inequality, racism in higher education), and will seek to work in collaboration with at least one NGO and one media institution. Students will report and produce a variety of journalistic stories pertaining to the chosen issue. They will also read and discuss professional and scholarly literature on subjects related to social justice/advocacy journalism (such as the question of journalistic objectivity, framing, media effects & agenda setting).


LEGAL 397N – Law and Public Policy

Monday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Cheryl Jacques

Examines ways in which law, especially constitutional law pronounced by the courts, influences the adoption, legal and political strategies, and public perception of major public policy issues. Several short topics, such as same-sex marriage, teaching of evolution in public schools, and Internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Major topics include reproductive freedom, right to refuse medical treatment, and end-of-life healthcare decisions.


POLSCI 340 – Latin American Politics

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

Overview of major approaches to the study of Latin American politics and survey of historical and contemporary democratic, populist, authoritarian, and revolutionary regimes.  Special attention to local, national and global forces shaping development strategies and public policies; changing institutional arrangements and shifting discourses of domination; and, social movements and strategies of resistance among subaltern social groups and classes.


POLSCI 361 – Civil Liberties

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15
Sheldon Goldman

Development of constitutional law in the civil liberties sphere. First Amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and certain rights of the accused; the rights of African-Americans and other minorites and the rights of women and gays under the equal protection of the laws clause. Prerequisite: basic American politics course or equivalent.  Honors Colloquium available (POLSCI 361HH)


POLSCI 373 – Contemporary Political Theory

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Barbara Cruikshank

Survey of some of the central texts and themes in contemporary political theory. Authors include Arendt, Foucault, Habermas, Marcuse, Haraway. Themes include authority, modernity/postmodern-ity, identity, rights, totalitarianism, lib-eration, communicative ethics, deterrito-rialization, pluralism, multiculturalism, governmentality and rationalization.


POLSCI 394SPH – Sports, Policy and Politics

Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

Where are politics in the spaces we go for leisure and play?  Sports and politics have become increasingly intertwined over the past 40 years.  Local, state, and federal governments, as well as non-governmental bodies like the NCAA, regulate who can participate in sports, and what standards players must meet to do so.  But sports have also become the battleground for major political discussions around sex equity, racial inclusion, sexuality, physical ability, and drug testing.  Why and how has this happened, and how can studying sports teach us about the politics of inclusion, political identity, and public policy? We will focus on the linkages between policy, politics, and sports in historical and contemporary contexts, primarily in the U.S. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.


POLSCI 397E – Indigenous Rights and Social Movements

Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Angelica Bernal

See department for description.


PUBHLTH 129 – Health Care for All

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.   Michael Begay
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.  Nene Okunna

U.S. health care system with emphasis on issues relating to unequal access to health services. An analysis of how the system should work. Special attention to controversial issues, including managed care and health insurance. How other countries design health systems.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


PUBHLTH 160 – My Body, My Health

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Andrea Ayvazian, Danierl Gerger, Nadia Schuessler

Principles of health promotion and personal wellness with emphasis on stress management, nutrition, physical fitness, substance abuse prevention, prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, and human sexuality.  (Gen.Ed. SI)


RES-ECON 470/470HH – Family Economics Policy

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Sheila Mammen

This course includes: (1) an overview of issues critical to the economic well-being of individuals and families around the world and its impact on the U.S. economy and (2) a review of public programs that affect the economic well-being of families in the United States. Special attention will be paid to the underlying philosophies of U.S. public welfare programs and their economic impact on households, an understanding of the policy process, and the fundamentals of family economics research. BS-ResEc majors can satisfy their Integrative Experience requirement by taking this course plus Res-Econ 394LI and 460.


STPEC 101 – Introduction to STPEC

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Katherine Mallory

This course will familiarize new students with the program and its vision. STPEC is a rigorous, democratically run, interdisciplinary academic program. STPEC is also a community of students, staff, instructors, alumni, and friends that will help you navigate your time at UMass. Ideally this course will also familiarize us with each other.  The content of this course is organized around concepts students will encounter in their other STPEC requirements, as well as in the STPEC community and the greater world. It will provide an introduction to social theory, political economy, race and ethnicity, gender, masculinities and femininities, globalization and inequality in the Global North and the Global South.  Assignments facilitate exploration of these and related topics.  Students will have the opportunity to learn the value of social theory and  how to make an argument; communicate for effective dialogue, and how to begin to identify social justice issues.     


STPEC 190A – Introduction to Radical Social Theory in Historical Context

Wednesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.


STPEC 391H – Core Seminar I

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Shakuntala Ray

Focuses on major theoretical currents in political theory and the historical circumstances that gave rise to those theories-in particular Liberalism, Marxism and Anarchism.  STPEC Seminar II will analyze contemporary social movements in the context of these (and other theoretical apparatuses).  As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines- including economics and political theory-but always paying attention to the historical construction and reception of ideas.    


STPEC 392H – Core Seminar II

Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

Focuses on a series of interrelated political, social, and theoretical movements of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Century. We will study some of the major political, economic, and social events paying attention to the ways in which ideologies and political consciousness are constructed and de-constructed in relation to historical events and in oppositional social movements. As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines.  This course is designed to encourage students to continue developing the critical-analytic methods and approaches discussed in STPEC Seminar I to some of these centuries' pivotal events. To that end, we will pay particular attention to the Russian, Chinese, and Cuban revolutions, as well as to the Spanish Civil War, May 68 and other events.  Students will also examine neoliberalism (or globalization) in an effort to understand the deep causes of cultural and economic changes the world has been going through in the past decades.


STPEC 393A – Writing for Critical Consciousness

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Ethan Myers

The STPEC Junior Writing Seminar focuses on individual development of voice.  We will weave this theme through standard essay assignments, weekly response papers, cover letters and resumes, and a student-driven class project of your choosing.  Since you and your classmates with be struggling together to find your voices, we’ll focus on peer-editing and tutoring techniques at the beginning of the semester.  As we discuss peer-editing, we may consider issues of language and dialect, Black English, Standard Written English and feminism.  The second half of the semester will focus on political, environmental, educational, cultural, and philosophical texts.  Throughout all assignments I expect to see cultivation of your voice and communication of your own creative ideas.  I encourage integration of ideas from your other courses and experiences.  Be prepared to think critically and examine texts carefully.  We will be sharing our writing with each other – be ready to give and receive constructive feedback. This course meets only once a week; do not plan to miss any classes.


STPEC 492H – Decolonizing Performances (of resistance)

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Claudio Moreira

What is Decolonizing Inquiry? What is Performance (auto) Ethnography? How can we think about Performing Ethnography? This performance-based seminar will focus on the implications of decolonizing emancipatory epistemologies for critical, interpretive inquiry. Drawing heavily in the works of Dwight Conquergood, Norman Denzin, and D. Soyini Madison, we give a rest to traditional forms of qualitative inquiry as we disrupt the notion of "business as usual" in the academic space. We will examine the interpenetrating relationships among performance, ethnography, and culture. More, we will focus on the relationship between everyday life and decolonizing performances. We will explore how communication in everyday life may be understood using performance as a metaphor and method of study. We will also look at how decolonizing performances are informed by everyday experiences. We will discuss culture as a continuous performance, from the “ordinary” speech of an individual to the elaborate rituals/practices of groups and organizations. We will look at how these everyday performances construct and maintain culture. The readings and assignments forefront localized critical pedagogy, critical personal narratives, decolonizing and interpretive inquiry as moral, political discourse. From the everyday space where gender, race, class, and performances intersect, we will examine how the practices of critical inquiry can be used to imagine, write and perform a free democratic society.  


SOCIOL 224 – Social Class and Inequality

Monday, Wednesday 10:10-11:00
Discussions Thursday 8:30 a.m.,  Friday 11:15, 12:20
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOCIOL 223 – Work and Society

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

This course examines the world of work through a sociological lens. It explores the ways that managers and the state have aimed to organize work, how workers have responded  individually and collectively to working conditions, how work structures shape inequalities, and ideas and practices to balance family, work, and leisure.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOCIOL 240 – The Asian American Experience

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
C.N. Le

Explores histories, cultures, and issues that shape the Asian American experience.  Using readings, class discussions, film/video screenings, and student-designed projects, the course explores the commonalities and diversity among Asian Americans. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOCIOL 288 – Introduction to Latin American Societies

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Millicent Thayer

This class will serve as a gateway into the discipline of sociology. It examines Latin America using a sociological lens and helps students to grasp some of the basic concepts that sociologists use to understand the social world. At the same time, it takes an interdisciplinary approach drawing on history, anthropology, political science, development and education, as well as sociology.


SOCIOL 341 – Social Welfare

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Michael Lewis

Critical introduction to American welfare programs, past and present.  Analysis of why programs change over time and of the effects of those changes on the people that welfare purports to 'help.'


SOCIOL 384 – Sociology of Love

Monday, Wednesday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Barbara Tomaskovic-Devey

The Sociology of Love looks at a subject that we all take for granted, but none of us understand.  Love is both a physiological state and a socially constructed experience.  We will examine the major bio-chemical, psychological, and sociological theories that have attempted to explain the causes and nature of love and attraction.  We will also look at the social construction of love through Western history, as well as in other cultures, and at the complex relationships that exist between love, "courtship", marriage, and sexuality.  We will conclude with a look at contemporary social constructions of love, sex and relationships.


SOCIOL 397N – Asian Americans & Inequalities

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Moon-Kie Jung

At least since the 1960s, sociology and the other social sciences have largely sidestepped questions of inequality in relation to Asian Americans, simplistically and indiscriminately positing them as a "model minority." This course examines various forms of social inequality between Asian Americans and other groups as well as among Asian Americans, including those based on race, gender, class, citizenship, and sexuality.


SOCIOL 397SD – Sociology of Disasters

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Sancha Medwinter

Disasters result from sudden or slow incremental environmental changes, technological glitches, industrial negligence, chemical pollution, and willful acts of terror. Despite various sources of disasters, they all culminate in unmistakable massive changes for individuals, rural communities, and urban centers. While earlier understanding of disasters focused on the impact of "natural" disasters on the built environment and fatalities, more recent sociological theories and case studies of disasters have given more attention to the social causes and consequences of disaster. Disasters bring about massive displacement, disruption to routine life, economic loss, death, physical suffering and psychological trauma.


SOCIOL 491R – Race & Racism in the U.S. and Beyond

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Moon-Kie Jung

Though biologically untenable, race continues to structure virtually every aspect of social life, from life expectancies at birth to death penalty executions. Topics to be covered in this course include the historical origins and evolution of race and racism, gender and class dynamics of race, antiracist movements, poverty, higher education, migration, incarceration, and nationalism. Considering and critiquing various theoretical approaches, this course reaches beyond the Black-white binary and, though focusing on the United States, also examines race and racism in other contexts.


SPANISH 397W – Latin American Cinemas

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Jose Ornelas

The course is designed to introduce students to the cinematic work of some of the most important Latin American directors from the seventies to the present. The course will center on a variety of topics that are vital to the understanding of the most significant political, historical, social and cultural events that have shaped Latin America. Some of the topics to be examined in the class are: racial, gender, sexual and identity issues; nation formation; revolution; immigration; repression; utopia; resistance; violence; freedom and slavery. Students will be expected to develop interpretative filmic skills through an exploration of the connections between the technical composition of the films and the social, political, and cultural context to which each film refers. Films for the course will be chosen from the following list: Camila, The Official Story, The Other Conquest, El hijo de la novia, Bye Bye Brazil, Central Station, Quilombo, City of God, Obstinate Memory, Azucar Amarga, Guantanamera, Memories of Underdevelopment, Strawberry and Chocolate, Nueba Yol, The Time of the Butterflies, El Norte, Amores Perros, Y tu mama tambien, Cabeza de Vaca, Like Water for Chocolate, Herod's Law, El callejon de los milagros, Danzon, The Oxcart, Ratas, ratones, rateros, The City of the Dogs, Our Lady of the Assassins, Machuca, and The Lion's Den. Requirements: two short analytical papers, mid-term exam and final paper. Course may be used for Certificate in Film Studies.


THEATER 130 – Contemporary Playwrights of Color

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Priscilla Page

Theater movements of Blacks, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans, and the body of literature by contemporary playwrights of color within a historical context.  (Gen.Ed. AL, U)

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