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Fall 2015

WOMENSST 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture

Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00
Discussion sections Friday, 9:05, 10:10 and 11:15
Banu Subramaniam

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations.


WOMENSST 201 – Gender and Difference:  Critical Analyses

#1 – Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 – Adina Giannelli
#2 – Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m. - Miliann Kang  
#3 – Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m. – Abigail Boggs

An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in a commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are ‘gender,’ ‘sexuality,’ ‘race’ and ‘class’?  How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, nationality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics; environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others.Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.


WOMENSST 295M – Politics of Reproduction and Mothering 

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Laura Briggs
Distribution Requirements:  Critical Race Feminisms/Sexuality Studies

From the Black Panther Party and Young Lords in the 1970s to SisterSong and Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice in the 1990s to Ferguson and Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement in the present, communities of color and socialist feminists have fought for a comprehensive reproductive freedom platform--birth control and abortion to be sure, but also the right to raise wanted children that are safe, cherished, and educated. The names of these issues have included freedom from sterilization, high quality affordable day care, IVF, immigrant justice, social reproduction and wages for housework, welfare and neoliberalism, foreclosure and affordable housing.


WOMENSST 293M – Perspectives on Masculinities

Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Thomas Schiff

This course is an introduction to the study of men and masculinities. We will explore what it means to study masculinities from varying perspectives. In addition, we will utilize an intersectional approach to explore men’s gender role socialization over the life span focused on men's developmental issues, gender role conflicts, and the impact of systems on the behavior and experiences of men and boys. Theory, research, and personal exploration are integrated through lectures, discussions, and learning activities.


WOMENSST 295F – The Feminist Art(s) of Politics

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Alix Olson

Poet Adrienne Rich argued: “Art means nothing if it simply decorates the dinner table of power which holds it hostage.” As a student in The Feminist Art(s) of Politics we will think about how the worlds of feminist politics, art and activism intersect and/or collide. We will investigate contemporary film, music, performance art, painting, children’s stories, and spoken word, as well as critical analyses by a variety of feminist theorists and artists. Through our case studies we will ask how these creative interventions function as a form of discourse in fields like war, immigration, capitalism, race, gender, and sexuality. How do they disrupt, resist, transform or in some cases preserve relations of power? A discussion-based format, we will also press each other on broader questions: Is there such a thing as a “feminist aesthetic?” What is "feminist art” anyway? How do we know it when we see it? Most importantly, we will ask how thinking of art as politics shifts our sense of what it means to think and act in feminist ways.


WOMENSST 295P/AFROAM 295P–Policing, Protest, and Politics: Queers, Feminists, and #BlackLivesMatter

Tuesday, Thursday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Eli Vitulli
Distribution Requirements:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

Over the past year few years, a powerful social movement has emerged to affirm to the country and world that Black Lives Matter. Sparked by the killing of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman in Stanford, Florida, and Zimmerman’s acquittal as well as the police killings of other black men and women, including Michael Brown, Rekia Boyd, and Freddie Gray, this movement challenges police violence and other policing that makes black communities unsafe as well as social constructions of black people as inherently dangerous and criminal. Police violence against black people and the interrelated criminalization of black communities have a long history, older than the US itself. There is a similarly long and important history of activism and social movements against police violence and criminalization. Today, black people are disproportionately subject to police surveillance and violence, arrest, and incarceration. So, too, are other people of color (both men and women) and queer, trans, and gender nonconforming people of all races but especially those of color. This course will examine the history of policing and criminalization of black, queer, and trans people and communities and related anti-racist, feminist, and queer/trans activism. In doing so, we will interrogate how policing and understandings of criminality—or the view that certain people or groups are inherently dangerous or criminal—in the US have long been deeply shaped by race, gender, and sexuality.


WOMENSST 295S – Sex and Liberation: The 1970s

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

As a result of changing understandings of and attitudes towards women’s sexuality, homosexuality, and premarital sexuality, as well as the rise of new social movements such as the women’s and gay liberation movement, new technologies such as the birth control pill, and legal triumphs like Roe v. Wade, the 1960s and 1970s witnessed a “sexual revolution” in the United States and indeed in much of the world.  Among other things, the sexual revolution was marked by new forms of sexual expression and practices and new visions for sexual relations, ethics, and sexual-social organization. Central to the sexual revolution was the concept of sexual liberation, the idea that repressed sexual subjects, desires, and practices were now freed of their previous constraints.  This claim was seen as particularly true for women and for gay men and lesbians. But what did sexual liberation really mean for these actors?  Did it mean the same thing to all?  How did women differ in their understanding and experience of sexual liberation?  Was liberation synonymous with pleasure?  With emotional fulfillment?  With independence?  Was sexual liberation even financially tenable for women?  And what did a politics of sexual liberation look like for different actors?  This course will explore the complexity of sexual liberation by examining the history of the “sexual revolution” in the US from the 1960s and the 1980s, focusing on feminist and gay liberation thought and cultural products from the period.  Moreover, we will consider the legacy of diverse visions and experiences of “sexual liberation” between 1960-1980 for the present day.


WOMENSST 301– Theorizing Gender, Race and Power

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

Ways of analyzing and reflecting on current issues and controversies in feminist thought within an international context sensitive to class, race, and sexual power concerns. Topics may include work and international economic development, violence against women, racism, class and poverty, heterosexism, the social construction of gender, race and sexuality, global feminism, women, nationalism and the state, reproductive issues, pornography and media representations of women.


WOMENSST 310 (formerly 391W) – Writing for Majors

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 a.m.
Mecca Sullivan

Fulfills Junior Year Writing requirement for majors. Modes of writing and argumentation useful for research, creative, and professional work in a variety of fields. Analysis of texts, organization of knowledge, and uses of evidence to articulate ideas to diverse audiences. Includes materials appropriate for popular and scholarly journal writing. Popular culture reviews, responses to public arguments, monographs, first-person narratives and grant proposals, and a section on archival and bibliographic resources in Women's Studies. May include writing for the Internet. Nonmajors admitted if space available.


WOMENSST 391Q/691Q – Monogamy: Queer Feminism and the Politics of Social Belonging 

Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Angie Willey
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

Grounded in queer and feminist concerns with marriage and coupled forms of social belonging, this class will consider "monogamy" from a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. From the history of marriage to the science of mating systems to the politics of polyamory, the class will explore monogamy's meanings. Students will become familiar with these and other debates about monogamy, a variety of critical approaches to reading and engaging them, and fields of resistance to a variety of "monogamy stories" within and beyond the academy. The course will draw in particular on feminist critiques of the nuclear family, queer historicizations of sexuality, and science studies approaches to frame critical questions about what monogamy is and what discourses surrounding it can do. Through historical analysis and critical theory, the class will foreground the racial and national formations that produce "monogamy" as we know it. Students will develop skills in critical science literacy, interdisciplinary and collaborative research methodologies, and writing in a variety of modalities.


WOMENSST 392R – Sexual and Reproductive Justice

Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Chris Barcelos
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to studying sexuality, reproduction, politics, and social inequality that draws on literatures in gender and sexuality studies, public health, sociology, and public policy.  The key objective of this course is to identify how racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia and other forms of social oppression shape sexual and reproductive health.  We will also explore the relationship between social movements, law, and public policy with regards to sexual and reproductive freedom.  The course will be organized around basic concepts with added content tailored to students' learning needs.


WOMENSST 394H – Critical Race Feminisms

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alexandrina Deschamps
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course will explore the intersection of race and gender and other components of social identity from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will address and respond to the unique challenges of the inter and intra relationships of women of color with feminism, locally and globally. One of the tasks will be to (re)-visit, (re)-vision, (re)-counter existing theories and bodies of knowledge, as well as analyze how historical and contemporary realities of women of color are profoundly influenced by a legacy of structural inequalities that is neither linear nor logical. The approach to this course will be to pay particular attention to critical analysis and the importance of understanding and applying knowledge - not just "knowing". We will explore a range of activist practices of resistance and their practical applications. By the end of the semester students should be able to have mastered arguments regarding a number of Critical Race Feminist themes and issues with sensitivity, eloquence, and grounded analysis.  This course fulfills the theory requirement for majors and the critical race feminisms distribution requirement.  Please note:  one course does not count towards two requirements.  Prerequisite WOMENSST 201 or 301 or any other 200 level or above WOMENSST course.  Permission of instructor needed for others.  Contact department for more information. 


WOMENSST 397P – Postcolonial Feminist Science Studies

Wednesday  4:00-6:00 p.m.
Banu Subramaniam
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

Science was a central force in the ideologies of colonialism and the successes of colonial expansion. Postcolonial studies suggests that this colonial legacy lives on in postcolonial nations. In what ways does this colonial legacy shape postcolonial conceptions of the state and its citizens and subject formation? We will explore recent work in postcolonial feminist science studies by examining a range of postcolonial sites and a variety of scientific disciplines. Some of the questions we will explore are: postcolonial development, bioprospecting and biopiracy, pharmaceutical testing in postcolonial contexts, colonial sexual science and the history of sexuality, surrogacy, the rise of genomic sovereignty in postcolonial nations, gmos and industrialized agriculture, and climate change.  Throughout the course, students will engage with postcolonial feminist critiques of scientific epistemologies (theories of knowledge) and the universalizing metaphysics (theories of existence/reality/nature) they engender.  This class will be team taught by Professors Banu Subramaniam, Angie Willey, and Jennifer Hamilton.  We will combine with another section of the class, based at Hampshire College.  Class will meet at UMass.


WOMENSST 397R – Sustainable Development, Women, and Gender: The Romance, Rhetoric, and Realities

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kiran Asher
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

The 2014 United Nations Survey Report on the role of women in development makes a strong case for linking gender equality and sustainable development.  Neither concerns about gender equality nor sustainability are new, but are re-emerging as part of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. This class examines perceived and existing links between economic development, women, and gender from various perspectives. Informed by feminist theories of power and politics we will engage with the following questions: How did concerns about "third world women" enter discussions about international development and social change? How have feminists concerned with gender and power explained and addressed the roles and needs of “third world women”? How have concerns over women and gender been adopted/adapted by development institutions and interventions, and with what results?  What role are women and gender playing in environmental debates about around climate change, food security, etc. How have women across the world organized to address their concerns, and with what results?  This upper-level course invites an understanding of the racialized and gendered dimensions of persistent social, economic and political inequalities. We will strive to reject the many binaries (theory-practice, men-women, structure-agency, etc) that plague the gender and development field and aim for a self-reflexive solidarity with feminist struggles for social change.  Students should have taken a 200 or 300 level course in women's studies or economic development.


WOMENSST 507/HPP 507 – Violence as a Public Health Issue

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Tameka Gillum

This course examines violence from a public health perspective in the United States and globally.  It covers topics from interpersonal to structural violence and approaches to violence prevention.

For WGSS students interested in Public Health, this course provides students with a graduate-level survey introduction to the issue of violence and the public health concerns associated with its presence in our society.  It will primarily address violence in a domestic context, though some international examples will be discussed.  We will address the history of violence, how violence impacts contemporary society, theories of violence, contributing factors, the public health impact of violence, and prevention and intervention efforts to address violence.  The course will cover types of violence at multiple levels, interpersonal, institutional and structural.  We also look at those most vulnerable to violence and how their social positioning at the intersection of multiple marginalized identities increases their risk. Our coverage will include but is not limited to intimate partner violence, sexual violence, suicide, gun violence, elder abuse, youth violence, workplace violence, gang violence, child abuse, homicide, school violence, police violence, corporate violence and terrorism. WGSS students have brought valuable perspectives to this course in the past, enriching class discussion and expanding thinking on this issue, while simultaneously learning from the Public Health approach. This class hopes to facilitate this dynamic interaction again this Fall 2015. Enrollment Requirements for undergrads:     This class is open to Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Seniors only.


WOMENSST 791B – Feminist Theory

Tuesday 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Kiran Asher

Required course for students in the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  Contact lindah@wost.umass.edu to register.  This graduate seminar in feminist theory constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. The seminar will be organized around questions that emerge for feminisms from the rubrics of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, transnationalism, human rights, economics and postcolonialism.  Feminist theory is inherently interdisciplinary and we will draw on classic and contemporary writings from the many fields that contribute to the “field.”


WOMENSST 792AD – African Diaspora Feminist Poetics

Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Mecca Sullivan

This course will explore the formal, aesthetic, and poetic innovations of black feminist writers of the African diaspora. Emphasizing the works of diasporic women writers from 1968 on, we will examine connections between formal subversion and rhetorics of identity and liberation that emerge within various feminist, anticolonial, and antiracist political discourses. We will take up the works of West African, South African, North American, and Caribbean writers including Ntozake Shange, Buchi Emecheta, Suzan-Lori Parks, Ama Ata Aidoo, M. NourbeSe Philip, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Harryette Mullen, Tiphanie Yanique, Akilah Oliver and others. We will explore these works through both key theoretical texts in African diaspora feminism (including those by `Molara Ogundipe Leslie, Abena Busia, and Patricia Hill Collins, and Evelynn Hammonds) and modern and contemporary poetics (such as work by Mae G. Henderson, Elizabeth Alexander, Evie Shockley and others) to examine Afrodiasporic women writers' contributions to conceptions of feminist, queer, diasporic and other literary aesthetics. Reading for the interfaces of the poetic and the political, we will consider the roles of formal subversion and generic invention in contemporary African diaspora feminist literary and cultural expression. Open to graduate students only. Satisfies the Transnational/Critical Race Feminisms requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies

Students who entered as of Fall 2013 will be required to fulfill a distribution requirement, enabling students to gain a breadth of knowledge in critical race feminisms (CRF), transnational feminisms (TNF) and sexuality studies (SS).  Majors will be required to take at least twocourses (total) chosen from two of the above categories. Minors will be required to take at least one course from one of the above categories.  Students who declared a major or minor prior to Fall 2013 may continue to follow the previous requirements (Women of Color courses inside and outside the U.S.). 
Note:  If a course has more than one designation listed, it can only fulfill ONE of the requirements. The major can select which designation they want that particular class to fulfill. 

 

CRF

TNF

SS

UMass Amherst

WOMENSST 295M – Politics of Reproduction and Mothering

X

 

X

WOMENSST 295P/AFROAM 295P–Policing, Protest, and Politics: Queers, Feminists, and #BlackLivesMatter

X

 

X

WOMENSST 295S – Sex and Liberation:  The 1970s

 

 

X

WOMENSST 391Q/691Q – Monogamy: Queer Feminism and the Politics of Social Belonging

 

 

X

WOMENSST 392R – Sexual and Reproductive Justice

 

 

X

WOMENSST 394H – Critical Race Feminisms

X

 

 

WOMENSST 397P – Postcolonial Feminist Science Studies

 

X

 

WOMENSST 397R – Sustainable Development, Women, and Gender: The Romance, Rhetoric, and Realities

 

X

 

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History

X

 

 

AFROAM 392C – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen

X

 

 

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures

 

X

 

COMM 394RI – Race, Gender and the Sitcom

X

 

 

COMM 497QP – Queer Performance and Publics

 

 

X

HISTORY 365 – U.S. LBGT and Queer History

 

 

X

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience

 

 

X

STPEC 491H – Senior Seminar I:  Reproducing Race, Sexuality and Citizenship

X

X

 

SOC 287 – Sexuality and Society

 

 

X

UMassCPE

SOCIOL 387 – Sexuality and Society, Session 2

 

 

X

Amherst College

SWAG 210/ANTH 210 – Anthropology of Sexuality

 

 

X

SWAG 330/BLST 236 – Black Sexualities

X

 

X

SWAG 279/ENGL 279/BLST 202 – Global Women’s Literature

 

X

 

SWAG 329/BLST 377 – Bad Black Women

X

 

 

SWAG 498/ASLC 452/FAMS 322 – South Asian Feminist Cinema

X

X

 

Hampshire College

CSI 225 – The Battle Between Science and Religion in Reproductive Health Policy

 

 

X

HACU 140 – Writing from the Diaspora:  Readings in Contemporary Women’s Fiction

X

 

 

HACU 392 – Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Digital Age

X

 

X

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

CRF

TNF

SS

AFCNA 208/CST 208 – Introduction to Twentieth-Century Critical Race Theory

X

 

 

GNDST 204SW/ENGL 286 – Sexuality and Women’s Writing

 

 

X

GNDST 241/ANTHR 216 – Feminist Health Politics

 

 

X

GNDST 333EG/ANTHR 316 – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Tehnology

 

 

X

GNDST 333AS/ANTHR 331 – Anthropology and Sexualities

 

 

X

GNDST 333ND – Love, Desire, and Gender in Indian Literature

 

X

 

GNDST 333SA/HIST 301SA – Women and Gender in Modern South Asia

 

X

 

LATAM 277 – Caribbean Women Writers

 

X

 

Smith College

AFR 289 – Feminism, Race and Resistance:  History of Black Women in America

X

 

 

AMS 220 – Dance Music, Sex, Romance:  Popular Music, Gender and Sexuality from 

 

 

X

ANT 251 – Women and Modernity in China and Vietnam

 

X

 

CLT 204 – Queering Don Quixote

 

 

X

HST 209 – Aspects of Middle Eastern History:  Women and Gender in the Middle East Development

 

X

 

HST 223 – Women in Japanese History from Ancient Times to the 19th Century

 

X

 

HST 265 – Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776-1861

X

 

 

HST 371 – Problems in 19-Century United States History:  Remembering Slavery:  A Gendered Reading of the WPA Slave Interviews

X

 

 

IDP 320 – Women’s Health in India, including Tibetans Living in Exile

 

 

 

SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization

 

X

 

SWG 203 – Queer of Color Critique

 

 

X

THE 221 – Rehearsing the Impossible: Black Women Playwrights Interrupting the Master Narrative

X

 

 

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Traci Parker
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Critical Race Feminisms

The history of African American women from the experience of slavery to the present. Emphasis on the effect of racist institutions and practices on women. The ways in which women organized themselves to address the needs of African Americans in general and their own in particular. The achievements of such leaders as Mary Church Terrell, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, and Mary McLeod Bethune as well as lesser known women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


AFROAM 392C – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen

Wednesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
A-Yemisi Jimoh
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Critical Race Feminisms

The focus for this course is the cultural, political, and social issues found in the music and history of African American women performers. The primary emphasis in the course will be on African American women in Jazz, Blues, and Soul/R&B, but students also will study African American women composers as well as Spiritual-Gospel and Opera performers.


CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Suet-Yin Chiu
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Transnational Feminisms

This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women's social role has evolved from pre-modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women's agency, "inner-outer" division, and the yin-yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.


COMM 288 – Gender, Sex & Representation

Sut Jhally

This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).


COMM 394RI – Race, Gender and the Sitcom

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Demetria Shabazz
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course examines the situation comedy from sociological and artistic perspectives. We will seek, first of all, to understand how situation-comedy is a rich and dynamic meaning-producing genre within the medium of television. Secondly we will work to dissect narrative structures, and the genre's uses of mise-en-scene, cinematography/ videography, editing, and sound to create specific images of the family through social constructions of race, class, and gender. In addition we will use various critical methods such as semiotics, genre study, ideological criticism, cultural studies, and so on to interrogate why the sitcom form since its inception in the 1950s has remained one of the most popular genres for audiences and industry personnel alike and assess what the genre might offer us in terms of a larger commentary on notions of difference and identity in the US and beyond.  Satisfies the IE require for BA-Comm majors.


COMM 497QP – Queer Performance and Publics

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Kimberlee Perez

The culture and legislature of the United States shape discourses that produce the rights, recognitions, relations, im/mobilities, in/visibility, and mis/understandings of LGBTQIA persons and groups. In the context of history and from various social positions, these changes are  read and enacted in multiple ways. This course considers the ways LGBTQIA  persons and groups use performance, on the stage and in everyday life, as  a form of communication, as communicative strategies that generate dialogue, resistance, and social action in order to more fully participate in  mainstream publics as well as create counterpublics and queer world-making.


COMM 793C – Post Colonial and Feminist Film Theory

Thursday  5:00-6:45 P.M.
Demetria Shabazz

See department for description.


COMPLIT 231 – Comedy

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
TBA

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.  GenEd (AL)


COMPLIT 392G - Gender and the Body in the Middle Ages

Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jennifer Barr

This course will explore medieval attitudes towards sex, gender, and embodiment. Reading medieval literature alongside contemporary theory, we will consider issues such as the relationship between the body and the soul, the boundaries between masculinity and femininity, and how “culture” and “nature” were thought to influence gendered identity in the Middle Ages. Course readings to include works by Abelard and Heloise, Chrétien de Troyes, and Marie de France; Silence, a thirteenth-century French romance; theLifeof Christina of Markyate, a twelfth-century recluse; medieval mystical literature; and essays by contemporary theorists including Judith Butler, Adrienne Rich, and Donna Haraway.


ECON 348 – Political Economy of Women

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Lisa Saunders

A critical review of neoclassical, Marxist, and feminist economic theories pertaining to inequality between men and women in both the family and the firm.


EDUC 202 – Social Issues/Intergroup Relations

Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.  (meets one Saturday early in the semester, 9-5)
Molly Keehn and Ximena Zuniga

This course focuses on student dialogue about issues of difference, identity and community to facilitate intergroup understanding.  Students actively engage, read about, and examine social justice issues in small groups.  GenEd (SB, U)


EDUC 624 – Contemporary and Historical Constructions of Social Justice Education 

Monday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Ximena Zuniga

Theoretical issues related to manifestations of oppression with focus on social constructions of race,gender and sexuality, and disability.  Instructor Consent Required.  EDUC 691E and 624 must be taken concurrently and a Mandatory HALF DAY writing workshop, TBA.


EDUC 683 – Women in Higher Education

Wednesday  4:006:30 p.m.
Benita Barnes

Women now comprise a majority of all American undergraduate students, but only a minority of senior professors, senior administrators, or presidents.  This course is an introduction to the issues affecting women in the academy as students, educators, leaders, and scholars.  Some of the topics include:  barriers to women's full participation in higher education, including sexual harassment and racism; the question of coeducation versus single-sex education; conditions for women undergraduates including the so-called "chilly climate."  In addition, the course will explore issues germane to female faculty members, barriers to institutional leadership, and the goals and contributions of women's studies as well as the current attack on feminist scholarship.  This is a seminar style course where students are expected to participant fully.


EDUC 691E – Social Issues in Education

Friday, Saturday, Sunday 9:00-5:00 (five meetings)
Ximena Zuniga

Introductory vocabulary and definitions, descriptions of the dynamics of oppression at the individual, institutional, and cultural levels.  Focus on developing personal awareness of social group memberships in relationship to two specific forms of oppression.  Introduction to selected literature on two specific forms of oppression.


EDUC 752 – Gender Issues in International Education

Wednesday  1:25-3:45 p.m.
Jacqueline Mosselson

Impact of national economic and social development on women's role and status, especially in Third World countries.  Analysis of educational strategies for promoting equal participation of women in this process.


ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15-12:05 – William Steffen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 – Rohit Lanez-Sharma

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)


GERMAN 363 – Witches:  Myth and Reality

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Kerstin Mueller Dembling

This course focuses on various aspects of witches/witchcraft in order to examine the historical construction of the witch in the context of the social realities of women (and men) labeled as witches.  The main areas covered are:  European pagan religions and the spread of Christianity; the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe, with an emphasis on the German situation; 17th-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the images of witches in folk lore and fairy tales in the context of the historical persecutions; and contemporary Wiccan/witch practices in their historical context.  The goal of the course is to deconstruct the stereotypes that many of us have about witches/witchcraft, especially concerning sexuality, gender, age, physical appearance, occult powers, and Satanism.  Readings are drawn from documentary records of the witch persecutions and witch trials, literary representations, scholarly analyses of witch-related phenomena, and essays examining witches, witchcraft, and the witch persecutions from a contemporary feminist or neo-pagan perspective.  The lectures will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources.  Conducted in English.  (Gen Ed. I, G)


HISTORY 190S – Sex in History:  A Global History of the Modern World

Monday, Wednesday  11:15-12:05 p.m.
Discussions Friday, 9:05, 10:10 and 12:20
Laura Lovett

This course will survey topics in the global history of sex and sexuality from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. We will explore continuities and changes in the definitions of sex and sexualities, the science and politics of sex and reproduction, the relationships between sex, sexuality, and imperialism, the sexual construction of social and cultural differences in different countries, changing portrayals of sex and sexuality by the state and by the media, social and legal activism with regard to issues of sex and sexuality, and the value of using sex and sexuality as a historical framework for issues in social, cultural, and political history. No prerequisites.  (Gen Ed HS, G)


HISTORY 349H – Topics in European Society:  Sex and Society

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jennifer Heuer
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Transnational Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

This honors course examines the social organization and cultural construction of gender and sexuality.  We will look at how women and men experienced the dramatic changes that have affected Europe since 1789 and consider how much these developments were themselves influenced by ideas about masculinity and femininity.  We will explore topics such as revolutionary definitions of citizenship; changing patterns of work and family life; fin-de-siecle links between crime, madness, and sexual perversion; the fascist cult of the body; battle grounds and home fronts during the world wars; gendered aspects of nationalism and European colonialism, and the sexual revolution of the post-war era.


HISTORY 365 – U.S. LBGT and Queer History

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Discussions Friday, 9:05 a.m., 10:10, 12:20
Julio Capo
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Sexuality Studies

Course surveys how queer individuals and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities have influenced the social, cultural, economic, and political landscape in modern American history.


HISTORY 388 – U.S. Women’s History to 1890

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alice Nash

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American women's lives from the colonial period to 1890, and explores women's participation in and responses to those changes. Topics include: the transformation of work and family life, women's culture, the emergence of the feminist movement, sexuality and women's health, race and ethnic issues. Sophomore level and above.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


HISTORY 395S/POLSCI 395S – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender, Race, and Class

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.


HISTORY 397DV – History of Domestic Violence Law

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jennifer Nye

This course will examine the evolution of the legal treatment of violence in intimate relationships, focusing specifically on the post-war United States and paying particular attention to the rise of the movement against domestic violence in the 1970s and 1980s.  Through an analysis of court cases and legislation, we will look at how and why such violence came to be seen as a crime and the criminal and civil legal responses to it.  We will explore issues such as:  the evolution from a feminist activist domestic violence movement to the professionalization of domestic violence services; civil orders of protection and the shelter movement; women as defendants and Domestic Violence Syndrome; domestic violence in the context of employment and child custody; the Violence Against Women Act; and how domestic violence - and the legal responses to it - might impact victims/survivors differently depending on factors such as, race/ethnicity, income level, immigration status, sexual orientation/gender identity, age, and marital status.


HISTORY 397WLH – Women and the Law:  History of Sex and Gender Discrimination

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

Using legal history and legal theory, this honors course will examine the ways women are represented within the law, focusing specifically on the legal treatment and representation of women in the United States.  We will examine the ways that the law has oppressed women and also the prospects for the law as a liberating force.  Finally, we will look at ways that women have used the law to represent themselves.  Specific issues that will be explored include the civil and political participation of women, employment, intimate relationships, reproduction and contraception, violence against women, women as criminal defendants, and women as law students, lawyers, and judges.


HPP 507/WOMENSST 507– Violence as a Public Health Issue

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Tameka Gillum

This course examines violence from a public health perspective in the United States and globally.  It covers topics from interpersonal to structural violence and approaches to violence prevention.


JOURNAL 425 – The Politics of Sport

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Nicholas McBride

This course examines how the politics of gender, sexual identity and race play out in the arena of sports. Through readings, writing, documentary viewing and discussion, students will explore the ways in which sports either constructs or breaks down barriers among individuals and groups and how journalism is involved in the process.


JUDAIC 318 – Family and Sexuality in Jewish History and Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Jay Berkovitz

An examination of transformations in the Jewish family and attitudes toward sexuality in Judaism, from antiquity to the present.  Topics include love, sexuality, and desire in the Bible and Talmud; marriage and divorce through the ages; position and treatment of children; sexuality and spirituality in the Kabbalah; sexual stereotypes in American Jewish culture and Israeli society.  Interdisciplinary readings draw on biblical and rabbinic literature, comparative Christian and Islamic sources, historical and scientific research on family and sexuality, and contemporary fiction.


PHIL 371 – Philosophical Perspectives on Gender

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15
Louise Antony

This course will offer systematic examination of a variety of philosophical issues raised by the existence of gender roles in human society: Is the existence or content of such roles determined by nature?  Are they inherently oppressive?  How does the category gender interact with other socially significant categories, like race, class, and sexual orientation?  What would gender equality look like?  How do differences among women complicate attempts to generalize about gender?  In the last part of the course, we will bring our theoretical insights to bear on some topical issue related to gender, chosen by the class, such as: Is affirmative action morally justifiable?  Should pornography be regulated?  Is abortion morally permissible?  Reading will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.  Methods of analytical philosophy, particularly the construction and critical evaluation of arguments, will be emphasized throughout.   (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


POLSCI 391WM – Women, Media, Politics

Monday, Wednesday  400-5:15 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

In this course we examine how women are currently depicted in both popular culture and in the "mainstream" media.  Specifically, we analyze the ways in which women's progress in terms of gaining political equality is, or may be, affected by, gendered representations (or the lack of women's presence) in the media.  Various solutions to women's under-representation - whether in the Boardroom, in mass media, or in politics - have been proposed, and we consider the extent to which these may be effective or where they fall short.  In this course we emphasize the ways in which women's under- or misrepresentation in the media affects not only women, but has significant consequences for men, children, and families as well.


POLSCI 793PC – Postcolonial Political Thought

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Yasmeen Daifallah

This course is a survey of some central works of postcolonial theory. It begins with an examination of foundational texts in that field of study such as Fran Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks, Edward Said's Orientalism, Homi Bhabha's Nation and Narration, and Gayatri Spivak's "Can the Subaltern Speak?" The rest of the course is regionally and thematically organized to explore major postcolonial works from South Asia (Partha Chatterjee, Dipesh Chakrabarty), Sub-Saharan Africa (Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Achille Mbembe), the Caribbean (Paul Gilroy), and the Arab world (Abdullah Laroui, Joseph Massad). The course will also examine some themes in postcolonial thought such as theories of postcolonial difference, and postcolonial feminism. This course raises questions like how do non-western thinkers conceive of of freedom, reason, equality, and political emancipation in the wake of a colonialism that has fundamentally re-shaped their modes of living and producing? In what ways do their formulations of these central concepts of European modernity embrace, question, critique, and/or cast doubt on their applicability to the postcolonial world? What alternatives, if any, do these thinkers put forward for the political future of their respective societies?


PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
John Bickford
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Sexuality Studies

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health.


PUBHLTH 390W – Fundamentals of Women’s Health

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.


PUBHLTH 497E – Global Perspectives in Women’s Health

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson

In this seminar, students will discuss a variety of issues affecting women's health around the world. Topics include maternal mortality, family planning, infectious disease, sex trafficking, and gender-based violence.


SOC 222 – The Family

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:20 p.m.
Discussions Friday, 9:05, 10:10, 11:15, 12:20, 1:25 and 2:30
Naomi Gerstel

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


STPEC 491H – Senior Seminar I:  Reproducing Race, Sexuality and Citizenship

Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Miliann Kang
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Critical Race Feminisms

Heated debates about "anchor babies," "tiger mothers," birthright citizenship, transnational surrogacy, international adoption,  family reunification-based visa sponsorship, and the global circuits of care work all attest to the transformation of motherhood, families, reproductive labor and the boundaries of nations and citizenship  in the age of neoliberalism.  Constructions of gendered citizenship have been based on fulfillment of white, middle-class, hetero-normative reproductive roles and have consistently excluded queer, working-class, women of color and single mothers.   This course addresses debates about contemporary motherhood and reproductive politics, going beyond narrow framings such as "abortion rights?" and the media-driven "mommy wars." Despite the persistent ideology of motherhood as a sanctified, individual exercise in love, nurturing and self-sacrifice, the reality of contemporary mothering is shaped by highly politicized debates that position the mothers, families and reproduction at the interstices of the market, the state and notions of cultural and national identity.  A four credit honors seminar for senior STPEC students who have completed STPEC 391H with a grade of C or better. 


SOC 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:10 a.m.
TBA

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOC 283 – Gender & Society

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Noa Milman

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.


SOC 287 – Sexuality and Society

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
TBA
Distribution Requirement for WGSS majors/minors:  Sexuality Studies

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOC 384 – Sociology of Love

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Barbara Tomaskovic-Devey

The Sociology of Love looks at a subject that we all take for granted, but none of us understand.  Love is both a physiological state and a socially constructed experience.  We will examine the major bio-chemical, psychological, and sociological theories that have attempted to explain the causes and nature of love and attraction.  We will also look at the social construction of love through Western history, as well as in other cultures, and at the complex relationships that exist between love, "courtship", marriage, and sexuality.  We will conclude with a look at contemporary social constructions of love, sex and relationships.


THEATER 334 – Contemporary Repertory:  Women

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Megan Lewis

Explores how women voice themselves and their concerns through theatre/performance. Students will read texts and see performances by and about women and will examine them within their sociopolitical/historical contexts.


 

AFROAM 117 – Survey of Afro-American Literature

Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Discussions Friday  10:10 and 11:15 a.m.
Brit Rusert

The major figures and themes in Afro-American literature, analyzing specific works in detail and surveying the early history of Afro-American literature. What the slave narratives, poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and folklore of the period reveal about the social, economic, psychological, and artistic lives of the writers and their characters, both male and female. Explores the conventions of each of these genres in the period under discussion to better understand the relation of the material to the dominant traditions of the time and the writers' particular contributions to their own art.  (Gen.Ed. AL, U)


AFROAM 132 – African-American History 1619-1860

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m
Discussions Friday  10:10, 11:15
Manisha Sinha

Overview of the history of African-Americans from the development of colonial slavery and the rise of African-American communities and culture. African background; Black protest tradition including abolitionism; the distinct experience of Black women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


AFROAM 197A – Taste of Honey:  Black Film Since the 1950’s, Part 1 (1 credit)

Thursday  6:00-8:30 p.m.
John Bracey

See department for description.


AFROAM 236 – History of the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, Wednesday  11:15 – 12:05 p.m.
Traci Parker

Examination of the Civil Rights Movement  from the Brown v. Topeka decision to the rise of Black power. All the major organizations of the period, e.g., SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League. The impact on white students and the anti-war movement.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


ANTHRO 270 – North American Indians

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jean Forward

Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their lifeways.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


ASIAN 397B – Bridging Asia and Asian America Colloquium 

Wednesday  6:00-8:00 p.m.
C. N. Le

Talks by local and visiting faculty, as well as film screenings and performances, designed to introduce students to the multi-layered connections between Asia and Asian America.  Areas that will be considered include: popular culture, youth subcultures, labor, issues of gender and sexuality, and migration and immigrant communities.  Discussions emphasize how issues play out at local, national and transnational levels.


CHINESE 597M – The Ming-Qing Novel

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Suet-Ying Chiu

This course introduces the major works of traditional Chinese fiction, including Journey to the West, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, and Dream of the Red Chamber. We will engage in close readings of these great novels, while paying attention to issues such as the representation of history, gender relations, changes in conceptions of desire, religious and philosophical beliefs, and the characterization of heroes and anti-heroes, among others.


COMM 297C – Humor in Society

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life, especially as it negotiates issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. This course also introduces students to the burgeoning field of humor studies. Topics include the different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and creativity, the political use of humor, the role of humor in maintaining personal and social identity, and the social aspects of laughter. Although the focus lies on contemporary humor in U.S. American society and media, the course also examines different cultural perspectives on the humorous.


COMM 393C – Issues in World Cinema

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Anne Ciecko

An exploration of the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s, '70s and later, hosted by someone who was there and lived to tell the tale.  Through the medium of documentary and fiction films, we will delve into the musical, sexual, artistic, political and spiritual upheavals that rocked America and Europe back then and that continue to reverberate today.


COMM 493M – Fashion, Media, Culture, Style

Tuesday 2:30-5:15 p.m.
Anne Ciecko

See department for description.


ECON 330 – Labor in the American Economy

Monday, Wednesday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
Valerie Voorheis

Introduction to labor economics; emphasis on public policy issues such as unemployment, age and sex discrimination, collective bargaining, labor law reform, occupational safety and health.  Department consent required.


EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education

Tuesday  10:00-11:15 a.m.  (5 sections)
Antonio Martinez

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression.  Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.  (Gen.Ed. I, U)


EDUC 258 – Educating for Social Justice and Diversity Through Peer Theater

Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Adam Ortiz, David Neely, Maurianne Adams, Michael Dodge

Students in this class develop dramatic scenarios to engage their peers with issues of diversity and social justice.  This class explores social justice issues on personal, institutional and societal levels, as experienced in schools, families, neighborhoods and on this campus. (Gen.Ed. U)


HISTORY 242H – The American Family

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Martha Yoder

An historical, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of families in America.  We will examine the histories of various groups, exploring how these experiences have resulted in different family dynamics.  We will then take up the question of the continuing relevance of race, ethnicity, and social class to families in America today and to the discussion of family in American politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)


PUBHLTH 160 – My Body, My Health

Tuesday, Thursday 8:30-9:45 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  11:130-12:45
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Daniel Gerber

Principles of health promotion and personal wellness with emphasis on stress management, nutrition, physical fitness, substance abuse prevention, prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, and human sexuality.  (Gen.Ed. SI)


PUBP&ADM 397P – Policymaking for Social Change

Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:25 a.m.
Brenda Bushouse

What is inequality and what is fair?  This course examines inequality across three major policy areas: education, justice, and labor.  For each policy area we begin with defining the inequality problem by examining race, ethnicity, gender, and class.  We then we explore the policy solutions that have been tried to create more equality (e.g., No Child Left Behind, minimum-wage, Three Strikes sentencing laws) and assess their success and failure.  Students will learn policy analysis and evaluation tools for assessing policies.  By the end of the class student can expect to have gained a deep understanding of these policy areas and the political, economic and social challenges for creating equality in the United States.


STPEC 101 – Introduction to STPEC

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 a.m.
Katherine Mallory

For incoming STPEC majors.  Introduces STPEC's requirements and vision, organized around concepts students will encounter in STPEC courses.  Focused on understanding the methodologies of social theory, political economy, and history, and issues of race, gender, global inequality, and the postcolonial world.


STPEC 190A – Introduction to Radical Social Theory in Historical Context

Wednesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.


STPEC 391H – Core Seminar I

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

This seminar is the first in the yearlong STPEC Core Seminar Sequence.  STPEC Core Seminar I focuses on major theoretical currents in political theory and the historical circumstances that gave rise to those theories-in particular Liberalism, Marxism and Anarchism.  STPEC Core Seminar II will analyze contemporary social movements in the context of these (and other theoretical apparatuses).  As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines- including economics and political theory-but always paying attention to the historical construction and reception of ideas. 


 STPEC 392H – Core Seminar II

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Shakuntala Ray

The second half of the STPEC Seminar sequence, STPEC Core Seminar II focuses on a series of interrelated political, social and theoretical movements of the 20th Century. In STPEC Core Seminar I we studied some of the driving forces behind the production of modernity as way to organize and understand the world. STPEC Core Seminar II will pay particular attention to the way in which the political practices and philosophies of the 20th Century relate to the successes and catastrophic failures of modernism in complex and contradictory ways. Some of the topics addressed include the Russian Revolution, totalitarianism, anti/post-colonialism, the role of identity in political theory/practice and postmodernism. A major research paper of the student's choosing will be produced over the course of the semester allowing her/him to both (1) more deeply engage with a topic, including one that may not be discussed in the seminar, and (2) practice applying the critical methodological and theoretical tools developed in the STPEC curriculum.


STPEC 393A – Writing for Critical Consciousness

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Ethan Myers

Students hone skills necessary to write in the genres that STPEC majors encounter most often in the course of their academic and professional careers.  Contact department for details.  Open to Senior and Junior STPEC majors only.


STPEC 492H – Senior Seminar II:  Defining Sustainability, Well-Being and Justice

Monday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Tamara Stenn
In this course students apply indigenous models of sustainability (Suma Qamana) and nature based design (permaculture) to explore the complexities of well-being and justice.   Based on a case study of indigenous women working in the Fair Trade industry in the Bolivian Andes, this seminar offers a critical examination of the political economy of sustainability and equity using Sen and Naussbaum's capabilities approach, Hofstede's cultural dimensions, the Legatum Prosperity Index, Gross National Happiness, and other economic models.  Students apply these theories/tools/approaches to their own regions of interest (local or global) to create their own case study for (or against) sustainability.  Critical inquiry will ensue, and an argument of what constitutes true sustainability will be explored.


SOC 224 – Social Class and Inequality

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOC 320 – Social Movements

Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Agustin Lao-Montes

Explores how and why social movements occur, what strategies they use, how they create collective identities, how issues such as civil rights, workers' rights, women's rights, the environment, the global economy mobilize activists' participation within the circumstances faced. 


 

WOMENSST 691B – Issues in Feminist Research

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Angie Willey

This is a required course for students in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  Contact department to register.  This course will begin from the question, “what is feminist research?”  Through classic and current readings on feminist knowledge production, we will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist?  What makes it research?  What are the proper objects of feminist research?  Who can do feminist research?  What can feminist research do?  Why do we do feminist research?  How do feminists research?  Are there feminist ways of doing research?  Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter, and to whom?  Some of the key issues/themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling.  The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.


The following courses will count towards the open elective requirement (formerly “feminist disciplinary and interdisciplinary”) for the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies

WOMENSST 692C – Issues in Feminist Theory

Monday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Ann Ferguson

This seminar is designed for graduate students who want to improve their background in feminist theory as it has developed in the 20th and 21st century United States.  Some background in social theory is presupposed.  Although the course will be organized topically there will be some attention to historical writings of feminist theory. The theories of race, gender, sexuality and social domination of Marx, Freud and Foucault will be considered through those feminist theorists who have appropriated aspects of their theories and methods.


WOMENSST 395B/695B – Feminism, Buddhist Thought and Contemplative Practices

Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Rose Sackey Milligan

Feminism and Buddhism both are concerned with suffering and liberation from suffering.  Both seek to bring about change through the development of awareness and the overcoming of ignorance.  Both address these issues as they pertain to individual minds and bodies and to group-level processes and social structures.  How can these two fields engage in closer conversation with each other?  Although we will examine the historical and contemporary contributions of women Buddhist teachers and practitioners, this course is not about “women in Buddhism.” Rather, it seeks to explore the following questions: How can feminist theories related to embodiment, anti-essentialism, reflexivity, deconstructing binaries, and challenging injustice converse with Buddhist and other contemplative teachings regarding enlightenment, liberation, compassion, suffering and breaking through illusions and unhealthy habit patterns?  What specific pedagogical theories and practices can feminism learn from Buddhist and other contemplative practices, and vice versa?  How can higher education bring greater self-awareness into the classroom and foster trust, openness and deep exploration?  What are the obstacles and challenges to these pedagogies and how can they be addressed?  Who is engaged in this work, and what lessons and resources can we share with each other?  The course aims to provide a space for students to experiment with new ways of learning, thinking and interacting with each other. 


HISTORY 592K – History of Contraception and Abortion

Wednesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Joyce Berkman

This Junior Seminar, although primarily focused on the history of contraception and abortion in the United States, is open to student research and writing on the related history in other countries. The course is organized into two parts. Prior to spring break, students will read widely in reproductive control, beginning with two court decisions spanning centuries -- the recent Supreme Court Hobby Lobby decision concerning contraception and a court decision about abortion in colonial Connecticut. During the weeks after spring break, the seminar turns into a workshop, engaged in the study of research and writing techniques and student presentations of the first draft of their term paper.


SOCIOL 792F – Families and Work

Thursday  3:00-5:30 p.m.
Naomi Gerstel

See department for description.


SPANISH 697 WF – Women and Film

Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Barbara Zecchi

Taught in Spanish. A close examination of the evolution of Spanish cinema by women directors through the viewpoint of gender and feminist film theories. This class will highlight women's mainly gynocentric cinematic scope and engage several of the most recurrent topics that shape women's films (such as violence against women, the depiction of the female body, and the rejection of traditional female roles, among others) in comparison with how these same themes surface in hegemonic cinema (i.e. both Hollywood and Spanish male-authored production). Furthermore this class will outline the historical evolution of female cinema: 1) Film-makers who worked before the Civil War and were silenced by Francisco Franco's dictatorship, 2) Those who had to negotiate their production within the regime's censorship, and 3) A third group that, in democracy, contributes to a "boom" of women behind the camera. By tackling the so-called gender-genre debate, this class will analyze how each group uses (or subverts) different male-dominated cinematic forms (such as neo-realism, the road movie, the film noir, etc.), thus shaping a female discursive "difference" in each period.


SMITH COLLEGE: ESS 550 – Women in Sport

Wednesday  9:00-10:50 a.m.
Diana Schwartz

A course documenting the role of women in sport as parallel and complementary to women’s place in society. Contemporary trends are linked to historical and sociological antecedents. Focus is on historical, contemporary, and future perspectives and issues in women’s sport.


The following courses count towards the “Transnational/Critical Race Feminisms” requirement for the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies

AFROAM 591A – Gender in PanAfrican Studies

Monday 12:20-2:50 p.m.
Karen Morrison

This course reviews the historical literature related to the social construction of masculinity and femininity for African and African-descended peoples.  The course compares the ways gendered notions of family, community, and nation have impacted local and international projects of black liberation.  In addition to the U.S. and Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America will be important regions of consideration.


WOMENSST 695A – Transnational Feminisms

Thursday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Laura Briggs
Distribution requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

How does a consideration of feminist concerns - gender, sexuality, the private, the domestic - help us interpret the current conjuncture? To get at these questions, this class will take up issues of secularism, neoliberalism, human rights, health, imperialism, epistemology, transnationalism, reproduction, and sexuality as they structure the relationship of the U.S. to the global south (particularly Latin America).


COMP-LIT  591L – Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Sean Gilsdorf

This course explores representations of passion, obligation, and love from the ancient Roman world to sixteenth-century France, in a broad range of literary and historical texts read in translation. In particular, we focus on the formal ways in which relationships were organized under the rubric of "marriage", on the relationship (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion, and the role of homosocial and homosexual desire within this complex set of relationships.


HISTORY – 594Z – Black Women and Politics in the 19th Century

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Irene Krauthamer

See department for description.  Open to Seniors and Juniors in History, Middle East and Judaic majors only.  Fulfills the junior year writing requirement for History majors.


 

DEPARTMENTAL

(100-level courses count toward the WGSS minor but NOT the WGSS major)

ANTHRO 205 – Inequality and Oppression

Session 1 - Ana Del Conde
The roots of racism and sexism and the issues they raise. The cultural, biological, and social contexts of race and gender and examination of biological variation, genetic determinism, human adaptation, and the bases of human behavior.


COMM 288 – Gender, Sex and Representation

Session 2 – Sut Jhally
This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).


ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture

Session 1 – Lauren Silber
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)


PSYCH 391FC – Intersections of Race, Class and Gender in the Family Context

Session 2 - Hillary Halpern
This course explores intersections of race, class and gender within families, and attends to the ways in which families are differently impacted by identity, privilege and social marginalization. Students will be asked to employ critical analysis of research and social thought to examine constructions of race, social class and gender, as well as what constitutes "family," and challenge underlying assumptions that inform our understanding of these constructs.


PUBHLTH 390K – Maternal and Child Health in the Developing World

Session 2 – Alice Fiddian-Green
This course is designed to give students a broad overview to pertinent topics in the field of global maternal and child health. Topics covered include causes of maternal and infant mortality, treatment of malaria in pregnancy, HIV and pregnancy, infant nutrition, maternal and child nutrition, gender roles, and cultural and religious concepts in relation to working in a global setting. This course will explore approaches to public health programming that acknowledge and incorporate cultural differences.


SOCIOL 387 – Sexuality and Society

Session 2 – Sarah Miller
The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)


SOCIOL 395K – Domestic Violence

Session 2 – Laura Hickman
Prior to the 1970s, domestic violence in America was widely viewed as a private matter in which public intervention was inappropriate except under the most extreme circumstances. Over the past several decades, however, domestic violence has been increasingly perceived and responded to by the public as a criminal matter. Take a detailed look at patterns and trends in domestic violence in contemporary America, explore theoretical perspectives about its causes, and examine the domestic violence reform movement, paying special attention to research that tries to assess the actual effectiveness of criminal justice reforms in reducing domestic violence. Part of the Criminal Justice Studies Certificate Program but open to all.


WOMENSST 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture

Session 1 – Martha Balaguera
Session 2 – Cassaundra Rodriguez

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations.  Gen Ed I U 4 credits


WOMENSST 285 – Introduction to the Biology of Difference

Session 2 – Josefa Scherer

The course centrally examines our understanding of the "body?". While humans have many similarities and differences, we are organized around certain axes of "difference" that have profound consequences - sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, religion, nationality etc. These differences can shape not only group affiliation and identity, but also claims about intellectual and behavioral capacities. This course will explore popular claims, critiques and understandings of "difference" as well as academic research, its claims, debates and critiques. This is an interdisciplinary course that will draw from the biological and social sciences and the humanities. We will explore principles of human biology - anatomy, physiology, sex/gender/sexuality, reproductive biology, genetics, as well as the scientific method(s) and experimental designs. The course will give students the tools to analyze scientific studies, to understand the relationship of nature and culture, science and society, biology and politics.  Gen Ed (U, SI)


COMPONENT

(WGSS majors and minors must concentrate their work on gender. 100-level courses count toward the WGSS minor but NOT the WGSS major)

ANTHRO 106 – Culture Through Film

Session 2 – Julie Andrea Buitrago Chapparo

Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology, through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics and social change.


COMM 336 – Consumer Culture

Session 1 – Emily West

Mass media are frequently criticized for their role in creating or perpetuating materialism and a consumer culture. This course will consider different theoretical and disciplinary approaches to understanding our consumer culture and the mass media's place in it. Topics will include the influence of advertisers on a media environment that promotes consumption; the experience of shopping; the exercise of taste through consumption; the relationship between consumerism, citizenship, and patriotism; consumer rights; and the meaning of consumption for economically disadvantaged groups.


FRENCH 280 – Love and Sex in French Culture

Session 1 – Patrick Mensah

Course taught in English.  This course offers a broad historical overview of the ways in which love and erotic behavior in French culture have been represented and understood in the arts, especially in Literature and, more recently, in film, from the middle ages to the twentieth century. (Gen.Ed. AL)


HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960’s

Session 2 – Julia Sandy-Bailey
Few questions in American history remain as contentious as the meanings of the 1960s. Observers agree that it was a very important time, but they are deeply divided as to whether it ushered in a needed series of social changes, or whether the Sixties were a period marked mainly by excess, chaos, and self-indulgence. There is not even agreement about when the Sixties began and ended. This course will build on the concept of the "Long Sixties," a period stretching from roughly 1954 to 1975. It will focus on topics that relate to struggles for social change: the civil rights movement, the peace movement, gender and sexuality, alternative lifestyles, identity politics, the counterculture, cultural production, and debates over multiculturalism.


HISTORY 170 – Indigenous Peoples of North America

Session 1 – Alice Nash

The diverse histories of Indian peoples of North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination.


HISTORY 290A – African American History from Africa to the Civil War

Session 1 – Irene Krauthamer

This 4-credit General Education course introduces students to the study of African American History. It begins with a discussion of the social and political conditions that prompted early twentieth-century Black intellectuals to pioneer the field of African American history and how the field has grown and changed over the past century. The course then charts the history of the African and African American experience, mainly in North America/United States from the late 17th Century through the US Civil War (1861-1865). This course also includes lectures and readings that highlight other geographic locations and major events in the African Diaspora, such as the Haitian Revolution, and will identify the ways in which they are connected to the people and events in the United States. Topics and events covered in this course include: trans-Atlantic slave trade; colonial legal categories of race/gender and slave status; identity formations; cultural creations and syncretism; slavery and the US Constitution; free Black communities in antebellum US; southern alvery and the domestic slave trade; slave resistance and religion; Black intellectual and artistic traditions; Black men's and women's political activism; colonization and emigration movements; Black soldiers in the Civil War; emancipation and the end of slavery in the United States.


LEGAL 391S – Islamaphobia, Multi-Culturalism and the Law

Session 1 – Christopher Sweetapple

Multiculturalism has become both highly contested and deeply entrenched in contemporary societies in North America, Australia and Western Europe. As a political strategy to manage the social friction between minorities and majorities in increasingly diverse nation-states, multiculturalism has come under attack from both the right and left poles of the political spectrum throughout the world for its ostensible failures. Muslims have occupied a central place in these local, national and international debates. The threat of Islamic terrorism has provoked a measurable rise among European and North American nationals of what scholars and activists have somewhat controversially named "Islamophobia". This course surveys scholarship about this vexed role of Muslim minorities in what is conventionally called "the West", paying special attention to how the domain of law has become the defining terrain in which these debates play out and are contested. Drawing on anthropology, sociology, history and legal studies scholarship, we will explore such topics as: the links between anti-Muslim attitudes and racism, anti-Semitism and xenophobia; legacies of colonialism and the impacts of transnational migration; the history of multicultural policies; contemporary gender and sexual politics; secularism, blasphemy and the limits of free speech; the interpenetration of immigration and criminal justice; profiling and terrorism.


PSYCH 391DA – Diversity Among Contemporary Families

Session 1 - Rachel Farr

The notion of the "traditional American family" is transforming. With new historical circumstances, American families have become more diverse. This course will provide students with an overview and analysis of a variety of contemporary family systems in the United States, such as single-parent families, adoptive family systems, and families with lesbian and gay parents. Students will gain understanding in family systems theory and in research methods for studying family systems. Course material will be considered from the perspective of social issues, questions, and public controversies, both current and historical  e.g., Is the traditional family disappearing? Is the institution of research, public policy, and law surrounding parenting and families (e.g., custody and placement decisions) will be covered. Prerequisite: PSYCH 100.


PUBHLTH 160 – My Body/My Health

Session 1 – Christie Barcelos

Principles of health promotion and personal wellness with emphasis on stress management, nutrition, physical fitness, substance abuse prevention, prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, and human sexuality.


SOCIOL 222 – The Family

Session 1 – Mahala Stewart

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).


 

AMST 238 – Deportation Nation:  From Chinese Exclusion to World War II

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Sujani Reddy
component

This course focusing on immigration will begin in the nineteenth century with the anti-Chinese movement and proceed through World War II. It will include an outline of the basic patterns of migration to the United States; the immigrants' relationship to settler colonialism and U.S. imperialism; U.S. racial formation; citizenship and family reunification; immigrant labor; “illegal” immigration; and struggles for migrant justice. Throughout, we will analyze the relationships between gender, sexuality, race, class and nation, and the ways in which these become points of struggle over identity, community, and belonging.


AMST 302/SOCI 302 – Globalization, Inequality and Social Change

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Leah Schmalzbauer
component

This course is an in-depth exploration of the increasing global interconnectedness of economic, political, and social processes, what many have come to call “globalization.” We begin by developing a sociological critique of the relationship between inequality, post-World War II global capitalism, and the neoliberal ideology that underlies it.  We do this through study of the major institutions and actors that endorse and perpetuate global capitalism. We then explore case studies which critically examine how contemporary globalization is playing out in daily life via experiences of labor, consumption, family and community.  We dedicate the last part of the course to investigating diverse examples of grassroots resistance to the current capitalist order.  As we strive to achieve a complex analysis of globalization, we will be challenged to grapple seriously with issues of power and social justice and to reflect on our own social positions within an increasingly intricate global web.  In accordance, we will focus throughout the course on how intersections of race, class, gender and citizenship influence the human experience of globalization. 


AMST 326/SOCI 326 – Immigration and the New Latino Second Generation

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Leah Schmalzbauer
component

This course focuses on Latino immigrant youth and the children of Latino immigrants who are coming of age in the contemporary United States, what social scientists have termed the “new second generation.” Currently this generation is the fastest growing demographic of children under 18 years of age. The majority of youth in the “new second generation” are Latino.  Drawing on sociological and anthropological texts, fiction and memoir, we will explore the social factors, historical legacies and policies that in large part shape the lived experiences of Latino youth. We begin by laying a historical and theoretical base for the course, exploring the notions of assimilation and transnationalism. We then move into an exploration of the intersecting contexts of inequality which contextualize daily life for the new second generation. Specifically we investigate how social class, race, gender, and “illegality” intersect with generation to shape the struggles, opportunities, identities and aspirations of Latino youth.


ANTH 339 – The Anthropology of Food

Tuesday 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Deborah Gewertz
Component

Because food is necessary to sustain biological life, its production and provision occupy humans everywhere. Due to this essential importance, food also operates to create and symbolize collective life. This seminar will examine the social and cultural significance of food. Topics to be discussed include: the evolution of human food systems, the social and cultural relationships between food production and human reproduction, the development of women’s association with the domestic sphere, the meaning and experience of eating disorders, and the connection among ethnic cuisines, nationalist movements and social classes.


BRUS 310 – Female Gothic

Monday, Wednesday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Judith Frank

Conceiving of the gothic as a kind of counter-narrative to Enlightenment and humanistic values, this course will explore the portrayal of women as embodied, liminal, irrational, and supernatural forces in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century novels in England and the U.S.  What kind of social forces helped bring about the emergence of narratives of excess and transgression?  How do these works conceive of female sexuality and sexual violence?  How do they think through and express the relation between reason and unreason, agency and irresponsibility?  We will also explore the rebirth of the gothic in the late twentieth- and early twenty-first centuries in the U.S., and ask what cultural forces brought it about.  Possible texts:  Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Charlotte Brontë, Villette; Bram Stoker, Dracula; Henry James, The Turn of the ScrewBuffy the Vampire SlayerTwilight.


ENGL 218 – Making Literary Histories

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:50 p.m.
Amelia Worsley
Component

What is “English Literature,” and how does one construct its history?  How do we decide what counts as “English,” and what counts as “literature”?  What is the relationship between histories of literature and political, social, religious, and intellectual histories?  What is the role of gender, race and class in the making of literature, and the making of its histories?  These are some of the questions we will ask as we read masterpieces of English literature from the mid-seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth century, alongside works that have not always been thought of as part of the canon, by women, slaves, exiles, political radicals, anonymous, and unpublished writers. Writers we will study include (but are not limited to) John Milton, Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Anne Finch, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Olaudah Equiano, Samuel Johnson, Phillis Wheatley, William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, and Mary Shelley.


ENGL 456/BLST 441/FAMS 451 – Ghosts in Shells?  Virtuality and Embodiment from Passing to the Posthuman

Marisa Parham
Component

This class begins with narratives about individuals who pass–that is, who come to be recognized as someone different from whom they were sexually or racially “born as.”  Such stories suggest that one’s identity depends minimally on the body into which one is born, and is more attached to the supplementation and presentation of that body in support of whichever cultural story the body is desired to tell.  Drawing on familiar liberal humanist claims, which centralize human identity in the mind, these narratives also respond to the growing sophistication of human experience with virtual worlds–from acts of reading to immersions in computer simulation.  But what kinds of tensions emerge when bodies nonetheless signify beyond an individual’s self-imagination?  As technology expands the possibilities of the virtual, for instance surrogacy, cloning, and cybernetics, what pressures are brought to bear on the physical human body and its processes to signify authentic humanness?  Rather than ask whether identity is natural or cultural, our discussions will project these questions into a not-so-distant future:  What would it mean to take “human” as only one identity, as a category amongst many others, each also acknowledged as equally subject to the same social and biological matrices of desire, creation, and recognition? We will approach these questions through works of literature, philosophy, media history, and contemporary science writing.


ENGL 496 – Literary and Critical Theory

Monday  2:00-5:00 p.m.
Alicia Christoff
Component

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and methods of literary and critical theory, a body of work that explores and critiques modern assumptions about truth, culture, power, language, representation, subject-formation, and identity.  Surveying a wide range of authors and approaches (postcolonial, gender studies and queer theory, critical race theory, psychoanalytic, etc.), we will also draw on the expertise of our own faculty, bringing in weekly guest speakers to help explain particular methodologies and to tell us about how they engage with theory in their own scholarship. In this upper-level seminar, students will grapple with complex theoretical texts, consider the place of theory in literary studies and in film, media, and cultural studies as well, and begin to imagine ways of putting theoretical ideas to work for themselves.


ENST 330 – Environmental Justice

Thursday  2:30-5:30 p.m.
Michelle Stewart
component

Environmental despoliation and degradation are unequally distributed across the disparate geographies of global north and south; urban and rural; the wealthy and poor; and in terms of production and consumption. Why do pollution and environmental degradation unevenly burden particular people and places? How do race, class, gender, expertise, and representation factor into the linkages between environmental quality and social equity? Should everyone have equal access to the same environmental quality, and whose responsibility is it to ensure this in the United States and globally? This seminar will explore these and related questions by critically examining the theories and issues of environmental justice and political ecology. Beginning with a review of the history of the US environmental justice movement, we will examine the social and environmental justice dimensions of US and international case studies of industrial agriculture, product manufacturing, nature conservation, urbanization, and natural disasters. The course will require students to write position papers, facilitate discussions, and produce a final case study analysis of an environmental justice issue of choice.


HIST 466 – Mexican Material and Visual Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Rick A. Lopez
component

We surround ourselves with stuff. These items that we create, use, display, and dwell in contain evidence about our lives. This course examines the historical role of material, architectural and visual objects in the creation of Mexico’s political and social order from the ancient Aztecs and Maya through today. Students will analyze material and visual evidence to learn about ethnic and gender relations, economic transformations, structures of rule, the experience of inequality, and the continual reconstruction of historical memory. Materials we will study include preconquest illuminated manuscripts, sculptures and temples; Spanish colonial paintings, architecture, ritual items, arts and crafts, maps, books, and botanical drawings; and modern sculpture, architecture, urban planning, maps, photographs, handicrafts, clothing, magazines, and even beauty contests. We will draw upon the rich collection of Mexican art in the Mead Art Museum, as well as items available in area museums and in digital archives. We will supplement our study of material culture with secondary texts and primary sources. Knowledge of Spanish and previous experience with Latin American history would be helpful, but are neither required nor expected.


PSYC 256 – The Psychology of Gender

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Megan McCarty

This course introduces students to the scientific literature on gender as approached from the perspective of social psychology. We will compare gender stereotypes with empirical evidence of gender differences and critically examine explanations for both gender stereotypes and the gender differences that we observe. The implications of gendered expectations for the behavior of both women and men will be studied in a variety of social contexts involving achievement, close relationships, sexuality, mental and physical health, and the workplace.


SWAG 210/ANTH 210 – Anthropology of Sexuality

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Sahar Sadjadi

This course draws on anthropological literature to study the socio-cultural making of human sexuality and its variations. We will critically examine theories of sexuality as a domain of human experience and locate sexual acts, desires and relations in particular historical and cultural contexts. The course offers analytical tools to understand and evaluate different methods and approaches to the study of human sexuality.  We will examine the relation of sex to kinship/family, to reproduction and to romance. As we read about the bodily experience of sexual pleasure, we will explore how sexual taboos, norms and morality develop in various cultures and why sex acquires explosive political dimensions during certain historical periods. The course will explore the gendered and racial dimensions of human sexual experience in the context of class, nation and empire. How do class divisions produce different sexual cultures? What economies of sex are involved in sex work, marriage and immigration? What has been the role of sexuality in projects of nation building and in colonial encounters? When, where and how did sexuality become a matter of identity?  In addition to a focus on contemporary ethnographic studies of sexuality in various parts of the world, we will read theoretical and historical texts that have been influential in shaping the anthropological approaches to sexuality. We will also briefly address scientific theories of sexuality.


SWAG 237 – Gender and Work

Monday, Wednesday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Eunmi Mun

How has the rise of working women complicated modern workplaces and the idea of work? One challenge is how to value women’s work fairly. One index of this challenge is that in workplaces across the world, women earn significantly less than men and are underrepresented in high status positions. What explains such gender gaps in the workplace? Taking an empirical, social-science perspective, this course will discuss three main aspects of gender and work. First, we will cover major theories of gender inequality, such as psychological stereotyping, social exclusion, structural barriers, and gendered socialization. Second, in learning about the sociological mechanisms of inequality in the workplace, we will expand our discussion to women’s work in the family and examine how the conflicts individuals face when trying to have both career and family influence women’s lives. Finally, we will discuss the mixed results of public policies proposed to reduce gender inequality and work-family incompatibilities and the possible reasons for those mixed results.


SWAG 342/FREN 342 – Women of Ill Repute

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Laure Katsaros

Conducted in French. Prostitutes play a central role in nineteenth-century French fiction, especially of the realistic and naturalistic kind. Both widely available and largely visible in nineteenth-century France, prostitutes inspired many negative stereotypes. But, as the very product of the culture that marginalized her, the prostitute offered an ideal vehicle for writers to criticize the hypocrisy of bourgeois mores. The socially stratified world of prostitutes, ranging from low-ranking sex workers to high-class courtesans, presents a fascinating microcosm of French society as a whole. We will read selections from Honoré de Balzac, Splendeur et misère des courtisanes; Victor Hugo, Les Misérables; and Gustave Flaubert, L’éducation sentimentale; as well asBoule-de-Suif and other stories by Guy de Maupassant; La fille Elisa by Edmond de Goncourt; Nana by Emile Zola; Marthe by Joris-Karl Huysmans; La dame aux camélias by Alexandre Dumas fils; and extracts from Du côté de chez Swann by Marcel Proust. Additional readings will be drawn from the fields of history (Alain Corbin, Michelle Perrot) and critical theory (Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva). We will also discuss visual representations of prostitutes in nineteenth-century French art (Gavarni, Daumier, C. Guys, Degas, Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec).


SWAG 300 – Ideas and Methods in the Study of Gender

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Amrita Basu

This seminar will explore the influence of gender studies and of feminism on our research questions, methods and the way we situate ourselves in relationship to our scholarship. For example, how can we employ ethnography, textual analysis, empirical data and archival sources in studying the complex ties between the local and the global, and the national and the transnational? Which ideas and methods are best suited to analyzing the varied forms of women’s resistance across ideological, class, racial and national differences? Our major goal will be to foster students' critical skills as inter-disciplinary, cross cultural writers and researchers. This course counts as a proseminar designed for juniors and seniors in SWAGS.


SWAG 330/BLST 236 – Black Sexualities

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Khary Polk

From the modern era to the contemporary moment, the intersection of race, gender, and class has been especially salient for people of African descent—for men as well as for women. How might the category of sexuality act as an additional optic through which to view and reframe contemporary and historical debates concerning the construction of black identity? In what ways have traditional understandings of masculinity and femininity contributed to an understanding of African American life and culture as invariably heterosexual? How have black lesbian, gay, and transgendered persons effected political change through their theoretical articulations of identity, difference, and power? In this interdisciplinary course, we will address these questions through an examination of the complex roles gender and sexuality play in the lives of people of African descent. Remaining attentive to the ways black people have claimed social and sexual agency in spite of systemic modes of inequality, we will engage with critical race theory, black feminist thought, queer-of-color critique, literature, art, film, “new media” and erotica, as well as scholarship from anthropology, sociology, and history.


SWAG 279/ENGL 279/BLST 202 – Global Women’s Literature

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:50 a.m.
Krupa Shandilya

What do we mean by “women’s fiction”? How do we understand women’s genres in different national contexts? This course examines topics in feminist thought such as marriage, sexuality, desire and the home in novels written by women writers from South Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. We will draw on postcolonial literary theory, essays on transnational feminism and historical studies to situate our analyses of these novels. Texts include South African writer Nadine Gordimer’s My Son’s Story, Indian novelist Kiran Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss, and Caribbean author Shani Motoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night.


SWAG 329/BLST 377 – Bad Black Women

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Aneeka Henderson

History has long valorized passive, obedient, and long-suffering black women alongside aggressive and outspoken black male leaders and activists.  This course provides an alternative narrative to this misrepresentation, as we will explore how “bad” is defined by one’s race, gender, class, and sexuality as well as how black women have transgressed the boundaries of what is means to be “good” in US society. We will use an interdisciplinary perspective to examine why black women have used covert and explicit maneuvers to challenge the stereotypical “respectable” or “good” black woman and the various risks and rewards they incur for their “deviance.” In addition to analyzing black women’s literature, we will study black women’s political activism, sex work, and rising incarceration as well as black women’s nonconformity in art, poetry, music, dance, and film. Students should be aware that part of this course is “immersive” and consequently, students will participate in a master class that will explore how dance operates as a way to defy race, class, and gender norms.


SWAG 410 – Epidemics and Society: AIDS and Ebola

Tuesday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Sahar Sadjadi

This seminar explores the AIDS and Ebola epidemics in the U.S. and globally, and the role of socio-economic, political and biological factors in the shaping of the epidemics. The course encourages students to think about AIDS, Ebola and other diseases politically, while remaining attentive to their bodily and health effects. We will engage with AIDS and Ebola on various scales, from the virus and immune cells to the transnational pharmaceutical industry, and from physical human contact to the political economies of health care. We will examine the racialization of the epidemics and study the processes by which some groups of people become more vulnerable to the epidemics than others. We will also explore the gender dimension of these epidemics, particularly the AIDS epidemic, from intimate sexual relations and power dynamics involved in negotiations over condom use, to global processes such as the feminization of poverty, the neoliberal economic restructuring of health systems, and the politics of scientific and medical research on AIDS. In addition, we will examine the role of social movements in responding to these epidemics.


SWAG 498/ASLC 452/FAMS 322 – South Asian Feminist Cinema

Tuesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Krupa Shandilya

How do we define the word “feminism”? Can the term be used to define cinematic texts outside the Euro-American world? In this course we will study a range of issues that have been integral to feminist theory--the body, domesticity, same sex desire, gendered constructions of the nation, feminist utopias and dystopias--through a range of South Asian cinematic texts. Through our viewings and readings we will consider whether the term “feminist” can be applied to these texts, and we will experiment with new theoretical lenses for exploring these films. Films will range from Satyajit Ray’s classic masterpiece Charulata to Gurinder Chadha’s trendy diasporic film, Bend It Like Beckham. Attendance for screenings on Monday is compulsory.


 

CSI 144 – Contested Bodies:  Race, Sex, and the Cultures of Biology

Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:20 p.m.
Jennifer Hamilton
(introductory course - counts towards Umass WGSS minor only)

Using primary and secondary materials as well as documentaries and feature films, this course explores conceptualizations and representations of race and sex in various domains of scientific thought. We begin by looking at the histories of race and sex in Western science. We will examine gendered and racialized pathologies, such as hysteria and drapetomania, and consider how scientific thought intersected with larger political and economic movements. We will then move into a discussion of the uses of race and sex in the contemporary life sciences. Why is the pharmaceutical industry developing drugs geared toward different racial groups? How have advances in reproductive technologies challenged or reinforced our understandings of our bodies? Why and how is sexuality a key site of scientific debate? Finally, how has the genomic age reshaped (or reinforced) our understandings of race, sex, and sexuality?


CSI 140 – The History of Love and Dating in the United States

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Lili Kim
Component

How have people fallen in love and with whom? What can we learn about our society and culture through examinations of the history of our dating practices and trends? This is an introductory social and cultural history course that explores the changes and continuities of dating and courtship beginning in the 19th century to the present. Through an examination of the seemingly private sphere of love and romance, this course analyzes the public discourse of social and cultural norms that guided, monitored, regulated, and reinforced the boundaries of not only sexuality but also gender, race, and class. Topics include Victorian ideal of love and intimacy, romantic friendship and the making of homosocial/sexual cultures, working-class and immigrant women's challenges to middle-class gender norms at the turn of the 20th century, the shift from "calling" to "dating," interracial marriages, acceptability of cohabitation without marriage, and immergence of professional dating services and online dating.


CSI 153 – African American Women in Defense of Themselves:  Organizing Against Sexual Violence in African American History

Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Amy Jordan

The question of how to resist, survive and challenge retaliatory violence directed against African American communities has always been central to the history of African decedents in the U.S. The extent to which the active role of women had been central to this history has been rarely acknowledged. This course will explore the struggles of African American women to defend the integrity of their own bodies; these struggles include the fight against everyday insults embedded in the daily indignities of Jim Crow; the efforts of enslaved women to protect themselves and their children, as well as collective organizing against rape and sexual harassment in the early and mid-twentieth century. One example we will explore is the story of Margaret Garner, the real life, nineteenth century heroine whose story was the inspiration for Toni Morrison's Beloved. We will also explore recent scholarship that centers the fight to protect the integrity of black women's bodies and reshapes how we understand African American social movements.


CSI 189 – Gender and Work in the Global Economy

Wednesday  1:00-4:00 p.m.
Lynda Pickbourn

The last three decades have seen the rapid integration of markets across national borders. This has been accompanied by dramatic changes in the organization of production and in employment conditions. In both high- and low-income countries, these processes have led to profound changes in the distribution and location of women's work. This course focuses on the nature of labor market transformations that have resulted from economic restructuring, neoliberal policies and reorganization of production in both high and low income countries during the past three decades, and their significance for women workers. The course takes a comparative perspective that points out the contradictory tendencies at work and emphasizes the shared concerns of workers across the globe. Among the questions that will be addressed in the course are the following: What does the 'feminization' of the labor force mean? What are the main trends leading to labor market informalization? What are the implications of these trends? Can we generalize across countries? What are the gender dimensions of these processes? Is there a role for government policy, international labor standards, as well as social and political activism across borders in raising wages, promoting equal opportunity, fighting discrimination in the workplace, and securing greater control over working hours and conditions?


CSI – 213 – Migration and Mobility in the Middle East

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
L. Keough
Component

Typically, the Middle East is viewed as a source of migration flows - a place people flee, seeking work and/or refuge in Europe and the West. But migrations to the Middle East and mobility within it increasingly characterizes this dynamic region. In this course, we will look at documented and undocumented, forced and voluntary migrations (labor migration, refugees, trafficking) in a number of contexts (Syrian, Turkish, Iraqi, United Arab Emirates, Palestinian). We will critically analyze the various types of powers and processes that structure these contemporary flows and we'll seek to better understand the perspectives of migrants and their "hosts." Throughout, we will pay careful attention to how the intersections of citizenship, class, race, ethnicity, religion, gender and sexuality affect the experience of migration.


CSI 215 – From Choice to Justice:  The Politics of the Abortion Debate

Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:20 p.m.
Marlene Fried

Abortion rights continue to be contested in the U.S. and throughout the world. Since the legalization of abortion in the U.S. in 1973, there have been significant erosions in abortion rights and access to abortion. Harassment of abortion clinics, providers, and clinic personnel by opponents of abortion is routine, and there have been several instances of deadly violence. This course examines the abortion debate in the U.S., looking historically at the period before legalization up to the present. We explore the ethical, political and legal dimensions of the issue and investigate the anti-abortion and abortion rights movements. We view the abortion battle in the U.S. in the wider context of reproductive justice. Specific topics of inquiry include: abortion worldwide, coercive contraception and sterilization abuse, welfare rights, population control, and the criminalization of pregnancy.


CSI 222 – Race and Queer Politics of the Prison State

Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
S. Dillon

This course explores the history and politics of gender and sexuality in relation to the racial politics of prisons and the police. By engaging recent work in queer studies, feminist studies, transgender studies, and critical prison studies, we will consider how prisons and police have shaped the making and remaking of race, gender, and sexuality from slavery and conquest to the contemporary period. We will examine how police and prisons have regulated the body, identity, and populations, and how larger social, political, and cultural changes connect to these processes. While we will focus on the prison itself, we will also think of policing in a more expansive way by analyzing the racialized regulation of gender and sexuality on the plantation, in the colony, at the border, in the welfare office, and in the hospital, among other spaces, historical periods, and places.


CSI 228 – Organizing in the Whirlwind:  African American Social Movements in the 20th Century

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Amy Jordan
Component

This course will explore the organizing efforts of African-Americans during the twentieth century. We will examine activism in both rural and urban sites and in cross-class, middle-class and working-class organizations. The readings will provide critical perspectives on how class, educational status, and gender shape the formation, goals, leadership styles and strategies of various movements. Some of the movements include the lobbying and writing of Ida B. Wells, the cross-regional efforts of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the post-WWII radical union movement in Detroit and the local 1199 hospital workers union movement in New York. By extending our exploration over the course of the twentieth century, we will trace the development of various organizing traditions and consider their long-term impact on African-American political activism and community life. A perspective that consistently engages the ways in which African Americans respond and locate themselves within larger global transformations will provide an important frame for our discussions.


CSI 239 – Feminist Economics

Wednesday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Lynda Pickbourn

Feminist Economics critically analyzes both economic theory and economic life through the lens of gender and advocates various forms of feminist economic transformation. But is there a need for a feminist economics, and if so, why? How is it different from mainstream economic analyses of gender inequality? What does a feminist vision of an alternative economic system look like? This course explores these questions in depth. The class will begin with a theoretical and empirical introduction to the goals and concerns of feminist economics. Students will be introduced to mainstream economic explanations of gender inequality, and to feminist critiques of these. We will then embark on an in-depth exploration of feminist economic theory, methodology, applications and policy prescriptions, and feminist visions of an alternative economic system. The course will cover topics such as sex discrimination in labor markets, the economics of the household, caring labor, and the solidarity economy.


CSI 241 – Renaissance Bodies:  Sex, Art, Religion, Medicine

Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:20 p.m.
Jutta Sperling

Ever since Leonardo da Vinci produced his anatomical drawings and German artists studied corpses of executed prisoners, the visual arts and the medical sciences converged. While artists strove for the anatomically "correct" representation of eroticized male and female nudes, scientists enhanced the truth-value of their anatomical drawings by employing the new classicizing style. Also in religious art, spiritual truths were conveyed in a sensuous, erotic manner, as the many depictions of semi-nude saints, Christ, and the Virgin Mary demonstrate. In addition to viewing Renaissance and Baroque artworks, we will read recent historical scholarship and primary literature on the discovery of the clitoris and the emergence of lesbian desire; anatomical representations of gender difference; the professionalization of midwifery; the debates surrounding wet-nursing and virginal lactations; male menstruation; homoeroticism in Renaissance portraits; and the invention of the erotic nude in Venetian art.


CSI 266 – Anthropology of Reproduction

Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Pamela Stone

This course focuses on the biological and cultural components of reproduction from an evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective. Beginning with the evolution of the pelvis, this course examines the nutritional problems, growth and developmental problems, health problems, and the trauma that can affect successful childbirth. The birth process will be studied for women in the ancient world and we will examine historical trends in obstetrics, as well. Worldwide rates of maternal mortality will be used to understand the risks that some women face. Birthing customs and beliefs will be examined for indigenous women in a number of different cultures. In addition we will examine the recent dialogues surrounding the technocratic model of birth to understand the changing focus of birth as women centered to a medical condition, which needs to be controlled.


CSI 270 – Constructing Cultures, Races, Subjects:  Critical Race Theory

Thursday  9:00-11:50 a.m.
Falguni Sheth
component

How do we know who is a terrorist? A good Muslim? A bad Arab? a criminal? A (bad) immigrant v. a cosmopolitan citizen? Do persons make decisions about their identities or are they "produced" in ways beyond their control? Can one's racial, ethnic, gendered self-recognition be publicized in ways that they like, or will that identity necessarily be misrecognized and reappropriated? In this course, we will look at a range of writings on how groups, cultures, and identities are created within political and legal contests. Readings may include legal statutes, case studies, ethnic histories, and texts by Foucault, Butler, W. Brown, N.T Saito, D. Carbado, K. Johnson, K. Crenshaw, C. Taylor, N. Fraser, Alcoff, Ortega, among others.


CSI 285 – Narratives of (Im)migration

Tuesday  12:30-3:20 p.m.
Lili Kim
Component

This history and writing seminar will explore different forms of personal narratives - historical memoirs, fiction, flims, and oral histories - interpreting American immigrant and migrant lives to examine critical historiographical issues in U.S. immigration history. Through reading seminar historical narratives along with award-winning novels and memoirs, we will investigate on-going construction of major issues in U.S. immigration history such as imperialism, acculturation, language, citizenship, biculturalism, displacement, belonging, family, cultural inheritance, community and empowerment, agency and resistance, as well as memory and identity formation. We will pay close attention to gender, race, class, nation, and sexuality as categories of analysis and lenses through which we examine the history and narrative of U.S. immigration. Students will produce their own creative non-fictional work (memoirs, films, oral histories) of immigrant/migrant narratives.


School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies
12 Emily Dickinson Hall
413-559-5361

HACU 221 – History of Women and Feminism in Britain and the U.S.

Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
L. Sanders/S. Tracy

This course is designed to introduce students to the main trends and themes of British and United States women's history from 1820 through World War I and to trace the various "feminisms" that emerge as a result of capitalist development and responding labor movements in each county. We will discuss individual women leaders as well as the movements they led and the ways in which "the woman question" was hotly debated in the press, the university classroom, and the political arena; readings of literary texts such as Bronte's Jane Eyre will complement our analysis of primary historical sources. Throughout the course we will focus on the convergence of gender, sexuality, race, class and politics in Victorian feminist and socialist reform movements.


HACU 281 – Women Writers:  Subvert, Seduce, Surpass

Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:20 p.m.
M. Whalen

What difference does it make -- to the reader, to the author, to the text itself -- that a text is written by a woman? Women writers over history have defied cultural prohibitions to break into public voice. In so doing, they have questioned, deformed, and reformed literary genres and cultural institutions, transgressing cultural expectations and producing literature of exceptional ingenuity and creativity. In this course we will explore women's access to and use of public voice during the early modern period across several cultures, reading literary texts in conjunction with historical and theoretical material. Authors include: Christine de Pizan, Giovanni Bocaccio, Marguerite de Navarre, Elizabeth Tudor, Elizabeth Cary, Teresa of Avila, Jane Anger, Michelangelo Buonarroti, Mary Wroth, Madeleine Neveu and Catherine Fradonnet, Louse Lab, Francesco Petrarca, Ann Finch, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn.


HACU 286 – Faulkner and Morrison:  Fictions of Identity, Family, History, Memory

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
L. Kennedy
component

Our purpose in this class will not be narrowly comparative but rather to read intensively and extensively in each of these master practitioners of the modern novel, paying attention to questions of form and style as well as theme and historical context, and thinking particularly about how they each frame issues of personal identity, think about family, history and memory, and confront the American twentieth century dilemma of 'the color line'.


HACU 292 – Cinematography and the City:  The Politics of Landscape and the Body

Tuesday  9:20-11:50 a.m.
B. Hillman
component

This film production/theory course will address cinematic representations of the body in relation to the architecture and space of cities including Mexico City, London, Dakar, Los Angeles, Tokyo, San Francisco and Paris. We will consider the determining roles of the camera and the body within films that center on the performance of shifts in cultural identities, emphasizing the body as the primary site of negotiation of identity. We will question how cinematic languages function as aesthetic systems that reflect the ways in which the body is coded in terms of gender, race and class. Screenings include works by Jia Zhang Ke, Robert Fenz, Tala Hadid, Jean Vigo, Nagisa Oshima, Ousmane Sembene and Abdellatif Kechiche as well as documentation of installation works by Masayuki Kawai, Isaac Julien, Francis Als and Mona Hatoum.


School of Interdisciplinary Arts          
Writing Center Building                                           
413-559-5824

IA 118 – Plays by American Women

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
T. Kingston
(introductory course - counts towards Umass WGSS minor only)

This course will take a close look at plays written by American women over the last century, exploring works by playwrights such as Sophie Treadwell, Lillian Hellman, Gertrude Stein, Lorraine Hansberry, Ntozake Shange, Paula Vogel, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Naomi Wallace. Each week will be devoted to a different playwright aiming to deepen students' understanding of Twentieth Century theatre, to stretch boundaries of genre, feminism and form and to interrogate our notions of "women's writing" as well as of an "American". Students will both examine how the plays speak to the particular time and society in which they were written, and the creative potential of producing them today.


NS 360 – Selected Topics in Women’s Global Health

Thursday  3:30-6:10 p.m.
Elizabeth Conlisk

This upper-level seminar explores key issues in global women's health, with an emphasis on Latin America. Topics span the lifecycle and include the fields of infectious disease, reproductive health, nutrition, chronic disease, mental health and health policy. Readings are drawn from the medical and epidemiologic literature although attention will also be given to the political, economic and social factors that weigh heavily on health. A complementary text will be the lay health care manual "Where Women Have No Doctor" which is available in both English and Spanish.


 

AFCNA 208/CST 208 – Introduction to Twentieth-Century Critical Race Theory

Monday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Lucas Wilson

This course examines the discursive relationship between race and law in contemporary U.S. society. Readings examine the ways in which racial bodies are constituted in the cultural and political economy of American society. The main objective is to explore the rules and social practices that govern the relationship of race to gender, nationality, sexuality, and class in U.S. courts and other cultural institutions. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Kimberle Crenshaw, Derrick Bell, and Richard Delgado, among others.


AFCNA 351/ENGL 351 – Sex, Race, and the Visual

Monday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
TBA

This course examines categories of race, gender, sex, and sexuality through the lens of the visual. Using contemporary literature, photography, performance art, film, and theories of the visual, our task is to investigate the import and utility of embodiment. How do race, gender, and sexuality function in the artistic imaginary? What can we glean from cultural productions that engage the viewer/reader in ways that challenge ideas about conformity, fluidity, belonging, and self-reflection? More than a linear literary or theoretical trajectory, this course will provide a template for all the mechanisms of the visual -- psychological and ocular, interpretive, rhetorical and performative.


ANTHR 246 – Identifies/Difference:  Anthropological Perspectives

Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Debbora Battaglia
Component

This course examines notions of person and self across cultures, with specific reference to the social construction and experience of cultural identities. Discussions focus on issues of gender, race, ethnicity, and the values of individuality and relationality in different cultures.


ENGL 280/CST 280 – Literary and Cultural Theory

Tuesday, Thursday 11:30-12:45 p.m.
Amy Rodgers
Component

An introduction to literary and cultural theory with an emphasis on twentieth century and contemporary thought. We will focus on crucial questions that have focused, and continue to focus, on critical debate. These questions may include representation, subjectivity, ideology, identity, difference, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout we will be particularly interested in the ways in which language and form mediate and construct social experience.


ENGL 208 – Contemporary Women’s Short Fiction

Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Valerie Martin

In this course we will read and discuss stories written by living masters of the form. We will not speculate about the meaning of the work or the author's intent, rather we will read as writers, noting and comparing each author's decisions about voice, diction, syntax, image, metaphor, and tone which, within the narrow boundaries of this challenging and compressed form, bring a world into being. Authors will include Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Doris Lessing, Sabina Murray, and Jhumpa Lahiri.


FREN 311HD – From Hope to Despair:  Life and Letters in Interwar France

Monday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Elissa Gelfand
Component

Study of French society, politics, literature, film, and visual arts between the two world wars as markers of France's complex relationship to the modern world: How did the optimism of les années folles evolve into the repression of the Vichy era? What was the role of the writer and artist in France's changing political and social climate? How did gender, race, ethnic, and class differences mark the period? What issues still resonate today? Authors may include: Cocteau, Breton, Colette, Weil, Beauvoir, Sartre, Césaire, Brasillach, Némirovsky, de Gaulle; plus films: Un chien andalou, L'Atalante, Regain, Princesse Tam Tam, La règle du jeu.


FREN 370 – Icons of Power, Lust, and Ambition in Pre-Revolutionary France

Thursday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Nicole Vaget

An examination of powerful female archetypes of 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Ambitious, influential women whose legends shaped the traditional cultural mindset of France's Ancien Regime and beyond. Using texts and visual elements (paintings, drawings, contemporary films), we will study how these iconic figures define the image of women in their times and in ours. Warriors, heretics, martyrs, schemers, nymphomaniacs, intellectuals, scientists. Do they constitute a stereotype of the quintessential French woman?


GNDST 204/ENGL 239 – Worthy Hearts and Saucy Wits

Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Katherine Singer

Eighteenth-century England witnessed the birth of the novel, a genre that in its formative years was both lauded for its originality and condemned as intellectually and morally dangerous, especially for young women. We will trace the numerous prose genres that influenced early novelists, including conduct manuals, epistolary writing, conversion narratives, travelogues, romance, and the gothic. In doing so, we will concomitantly examine the novel's immense formal experimentation alongside debates about developing notions of gender and class as well as the feeling, thinking individual. Authors may include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, Burney, and others.


GNDST 204SW/ENGL 286 – Sexuality and Women’s Writing

Monday, Wednesday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Young

An examination of how U.S. women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first century represent sexuality in prose. Topics to include: lesbian, queer, homoerotic, and transgender possibilities; literary strategies for encoding sexuality, including modernist experiment and uses of genre; thematic interdependencies between sexuality and race; historical contexts, including the 'inversion' model of homosexuality and the Stonewall rebellion. Authors studied may include Barnes, Bechdel, Cather, Chopin, Feinberg, Highsmith, Jackson, Larsen, McCullers, Moraga, Nestle, Stein, and Truong; supplemental critical readings may include Butler, Lorde, Rich, and Sedgwick.


GNDST 206US/HIST 276 –  U.S. Women’s History since 1890

Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Mary Renda

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1880s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's social and cultural activism.


GNDST 221/POLIT 233 – Introduction to Feminist Theory

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Markovits

This course explores the overlapping dualities of the feminine and the masculine, the private and the public, the home and the world. We examine different forms of power over the body; the ways gender and sexual identities reinforce or challenge the established order; and the cultural determinants of 'women's emancipation.' We emphasize the politics of feminism, dealing with themes that include culture, democracy, and the particularly political role of theory and on theoretical attempts to grasp the complex ties and tensions between sex, gender, and power.


GNDST 241/ANTHR 216 – Feminist Health Politics

Tuesday, Thursday  2:40-3:55 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.


GNDST 333EG/ANTHR 316 – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Tehnology

Friday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the "naturalness" of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts, documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field. We will also experiment with "public engagement" activities designed to foster knowledge and conversations about RGTs and the questions and concerns they might raise.


GNDST 333AS/ANTHR 331 – Anthropology and Sexualities

Tuesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Lynn Morgan

This seminar focuses on contemporary anthropological scholarship concerned with the varieties of sexual expression in diverse cultural settings. We will read ethnographic accounts of sexual ideologies and the politics and practices of sexuality in Brazil, Japan, Native North America, India, and elsewhere. We will examine anthropological theories of sexuality with an emphasis on contemporary issues, including performance theory, 'third gender' theories, sexual identity formulation, and techniques used by various societies to discipline the body.


GNDST 333ND – Love, Desire, and Gender in Indian Literature

Tuesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Indira Peterson

We will read classic poems, plays, and narratives in translation from Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, and other languages, in relation to aesthetic theory, visual arts (miniature paintings) and performance genres (Indian dance and the modern Bollywood cinema). Study of the conventions of courtly love, including aesthetic mood (rasa) and natural landscapes, and their transformation in Hindu bhakti and Sufi Muslim mystical texts, the Radha-Krishna myth, and film. Focus on representations of women and men, and on issues of power, voice, and agency.


GNDST 333SA/HIST 301SA – Women and Gender in Modern South Asia

Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Kavita Datla

This colloquium will explore the history of South Asia as seen from women's perspectives. We will read writings by women from the ancient period to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences in a range of social, cultural, and religious contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, rights to education and employment, violence against women, modernity and citizenship--in short, those issues central to women's movements in modern South Asia. In addition to the textual sources, the course will analyze Indian popular film and the representation of women in this modern visual genre.


GNDST 333VR/FREN 351VR – Viragos, Virgins, and Visionaries

Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Christopher Rivers

In this course, we will study the three most celebrated French female saints: Jeanne d'Arc, Thérèse de Lisieux and Bernadette de Lourdes. Their stories are similar: ordinary young women to whom extraordinary things happened, who became symbols of France and inspired a rich verbal and visual iconography. Yet they are profoundly different: Joan was a warrior, Thérèse a memoirist, Bernadette a visionary. We will study the facts of their lives, in their own words and those of others, but also the many fictions, semi-fictions, myths and legends based on those lives. We will analyze a number of films and visual images as well as literary and non-literary texts in our attempt to understand these cases of specifically female, specifically French sainthood.


GNDST 333WT – Witches in the Modern Imagination

Tuesday 1:15-4:05 p.m.
Erika Rundle

From the middle ages to the present day, witches have evoked both fear and fascination. Their fellowships (real or fantastic) challenged the prevailing power structures of church and state patriarchies and upset the ordered precepts of the modern world. This seminar offers an overview of the history of witchcraft in Atlantic cultures, with special attention to the early modern British and American colonial eras. We will examine figures of the witch in European art; religious and legal texts that document the persecution of sorcerers; and dramatic, literary, and cinematic representations of witches that have helped to shape our understanding of gender, nature, theatricality, and power.


GEOL 399 – Getting Ahead in Geology and Geography

Friday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Michelle Markley

This course is designed to introduce students to social, cultural, historical, and political perspectives on gender and its construction. Through discussion and writing, we will explore the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality in multiple settings and contexts. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to a variety of questions, we will consider the distinctions between sex and gender, women's economic status, the making of masculinity, sexual violence, queer movements, racism, and the challenges of feminist activism across nations, and possibilities for change. We will also examine the development of feminist theory, including its promises and challenges.


GRMST 325BG – Deutschsein-Images of Being German:  Identities, Languages, and Cultures

Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Gabriele Davis
Component

Fouqué's Undine, a 'migrant' author's bestseller of Romanticism -- the iconic era of German Nationalism -- inspired Austrian Bachmann in her 1961 subversive tale Undine geht, which challenges and transcends gender and other social-cultural boundaries. Weimar Cinema 'realized' the cultural-critical and economic dimensions of Romantic texts by filming the margins: Dracula, shadows, fairytales. Even Nazi-supporter Riefenstahl drew on the dark side of the tradition. All postwar Germanys have struggled to find common languages for a globalized economy and a de-facto immigrant society. Presently culture wars are raging again about gender-inclusive language and the Judeo-Christian tradition versus Islam.


LATAM 277 – Caribbean Women Writers

Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Dorothy E. Knight-Mosby

Comparative examination of contemporary women's writing in the Caribbean. Emphasis will be on their engagement with issues of history, cultural articulation, race, class, gender, and nationality, including exploration of their formal procedures, individual moods, regional particularity, and general impact as writers. Rosario Ferré, Ana Lydia Vega, Julia Alvarez, Edna Brodber, Maryse Condé, Simone Schwarz-Bart, Jean Rhys, Beryl Gilroy, and Rosa Guy are among those whose works we will review.


SOCI 216GM – Issues in Sociology:  Generations, Media, and Soceity

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Kenneth Tucker
component

This course will explore the concept of generation within sociology, and its differences from other structural concepts such as class and gender. In particular, the course will concentrate on the generational cultures of the 1960s, the 1980s, and the contemporary millennial generation. It will focus in large part on generational uses of media, and how media use contributes to the rise of generational cultures and consciousness.


 

AFR 155 – Introduction to Black Women’s Studies

Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Richie Barnes

This course will examine historical, critical and theoretical perspectives on the development of Black feminist theory/praxis. The course will draw from the 19th century to the present, but will focus on the contemporary Black feminist intellectual tradition that achieved notoriety in the 1970s and initiated a global debate on "western" and global feminisms. Central to our exploration will be the analysis of the intersectional relationship between theory and practice, and of race, to gender and class. We will conclude the course with the exploration of various expressions of contemporary Black feminist thought around the globe as a way of broadening our knowledge of feminist theory.


AFR 242 – Death and Dying in Black Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:20 p.m.
Kevin Quashie
component

What does death and dying mean in black culture, given the evidentiary history of black death, even the ways that blackness as an idea signifies death? Using a cultural studies perspective, this course will look at the distinction between and representational meanings of death and dying in black culture.  To do this, we will consider different historical periods and cultural forms; we will think about gender, sexuality, class, religion, region; we will think about genre and nationalism, as well as death and dying’s not-too-distant relatives: memory, agency, loss, love.


AFR 289 – Feminism, Race and Resistance:  History of Black Women in America

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Paula Giddings

This interdisciplinary colloquial course explores the historical and theoretical perspectives of African American women from the time of slavery to the post-civil rights era. A central concern of the course is the examination of how black women shaped and were shaped by the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality in American culture.


AMS 220 – Dance Music, Sex, Romance:  Popular Music, Gender and Sexuality from Rock to Rap

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Steve Waksman

Since the 1950s rock-n-roll and other forms of youth-oriented popular music in the U.S. have embodied rebellion. Yet the rebellion that rock and other popular music styles like rap have offered has often been more available to men than women. Similarly, the sexual liberation associated with popular music in the rock and rap eras has been far more open to “straight” desires over “queer.” This course will examine how popular music from the 1950s to the present has been shaped by gender and sexuality, and the extent to which the music and its associated cultural practices have allowed artists and audiences to challenge gender and sexual norms, or alternately have served to reinforce those norms albeit with loud guitars and a heavy beat.


ANT 241 – Anthropology of Development

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Elliot Fratkin
Component

The Anthropology of Development compares three explanatory models -- modernization theory, dependency theory, and indigenous or alternative development -- to understand social change today. Who sponsors development programs and why? How are power, ethnicity, and gender relations affected? How do anthropologists contribute to and critique programs of social and economic development? The course will discuss issues of gender, health care, population growth, and economic empowerment with readings from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and Latin America.


ANT 251 – Women and Modernity in China and Vietnam

Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Suzanne Gottschang

This course explores the roles, representations and experiences of women in 20th-century China and Vietnam in the context of the modernization projects of these countries. Through ethnographic and historical readings, film and discussion, this course examines how issues pertaining to women and gender relations have been highlighted in political, economic, and cultural institutions. The course compares the ways that Asian women have experienced these processes through three major topics: war and revolution, the gendered aspects of work and women in relation to the family.


CLT 204 – Queering Don Quixote

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Reyes Lazaro

This course is devoted to a slow reading of Don Quijote de la Mancha(1605-1615), allegedly the first and most influential modern novel. Our approach to this hilarious masterpiece by Cervantes is through a "queering" focus, i.e., as a text that exposes all sorts of binary oppositions (literary, sexual, social, religious and ethnic), such as: high-low; tradition vs individual creativity; historical vs literary truth; man vs woman; authenticity vs performance; Moor vs Christian; humorous vs tragic. The course also covers the crucial role played by Don Quixote in the development of modern and postmodern novelistic concepts (multiple narrators, fictional authors, palimpsest, dialogism) and examples of its world-wide impact. With an optional 1-credit course in Spanish (SPN 356) for those who want to perfect their linguistic and literary skills by reading, translating and commenting selected sections of Miguel de Cervantes' masterpiece and additional secondary literature in Spanish F 1:10-2:30; see under Spanish and Portuguese).


CLT 300 – 20th Century Literatures of Africa

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Katwiwa Mule
Component

A study of the major writers of modern Africa with emphasis on several key questions: how did modern African literature emerge? Is the term “African literature” a useful category? How do African writers challenge Western representations of Africa? How do they articulate the crisis of independence and postcoloniality? How do women writers reshape our understanding of gender and the politics of resistance? Texts may include Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Ngugi wa Thiongo’s The River Between, Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, David Mulwa’s We Come in Peace, Ndebele Njabulo’s The Cry of Winnie Mandela, and Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy. We also watch films such as White King, Red Rubber, Black Death, Tsotsi and District 9.


EAL 242 – Modern Japanese Literature

Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Kimberly Kono
component

A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. Over the last century and a half, Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation following its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. All readings are in English translation.


ENG 241 – The Empire Writes Back:  Postcolonial Literature

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Ambreen Hai
component

An introduction to Anglophone fiction, poetry, drama and film from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia in the aftermath of the British empire. Concerns include: the cultural work of writers as they respond to histories of colonial dominance; their ambivalence towards English linguistic, literary and cultural legacies; the ways literature can (re)construct national identities and histories, and explore assumptions of race, gender, class and sexuality; the distinctiveness of women writers and their modes of contesting cultural and colonial ideologies; global diasporas, migration and U.S. imperialism. Readings include Achebe, Adichie, Aidoo, Dangarembga, Fanon, Walcott, Cliff, Markandaya, Rushdie, Jhumpa Lahiri, Mohsin Hamid and some theoretical essays.


EAS 34- Women’s Health:  Current Topics

Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Barbara Breham-Curtis

A seminar focusing on current research papers in women’s health. Recent topics have included reproductive health issues, eating disorders, heart disease, depression, autoimmune disorders and breast cancer.


FYS 107 – Women of the Odyssey

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Justina Gregory

Homer’s Odyssey presents a gallery of memorable women: Penelope above all, but also Nausicaa, Calypso and Circe. Helen plays a cameo role, while Clytemnestra is regularly invoked as a negative example. Together these women define a spectrum of female roles and possibilities: the faithful wife, the bride-to-be, the temptress, the adulteress, the murderer. We begin with a careful reading of theOdyssey, then study the afterlife of its female characters in the Western literary tradition. Readings are drawn from authors both ancient (Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Ovid) and modern (H.D., Robert Graves, Louise Gluck, Margaret Drabble). This course counts toward the classics, classical studies and study of women and gender majors.


FYS 149 – Leveling the Playing Field:  History, Politics and Women’s Education in the U.S.

Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:10 p.m.
Christine Shelton

In this seminar we will explore the circumstances in which American women came to imagine new leadership roles in social and political life, and the particular role that sports and athletics have played in this process.  We will explore women’s efforts to gain access to higher education, the professions, scientific training and political power.  We will survey women’s past and present involvement with sport and physical activity. What are the issues and debates surrounding gender and sport as well as gender and education? How has the interpretation of Title IX supported and hindered full access to participation and leadership in sport for women and girls?  Readings will consist of autobiography, historical documents and political tracts, as well as scholarly analyses of women’s movements at several junctures in American political life. This seminar is intended to foster critical thinking skills and will include access to the Sophia Smith Collection.

 


FYS 153 – The Bollywood Matinee:  Gender, Nation and Globalization through the Lens of Popular Indian Cinema

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

This course engages the world of popular Indian cinema, Bollywood and beyond. We integrate scholarly articles on the subject, lectures, in-depth discussions, and of course, film screenings to explore the history and political economy of India and South Asia. Students analyze how this vital cultural form deals with the politics of gender, class, caste, religion and Indian nationalism. Our discussions simultaneously focus on the role of globalization, migration and the cultural significance of Indian characters on international media; for example, Raj in the popular American sit-com The Big Bang Theory. Students are expected to engage with the readings, bring their reflections and actively participate in class discussions.


FYS 175 – Love Stories

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:30 p.m.
Ambreen Hai

Could a Jane Austen heroine ever marry a servant? What notions about class, decorum, or identity dictate what seem to be choices of the heart? How are individual desires shaped or produced by social, historical and cultural forces, by dominant assumptions about race, class, gender, or sexuality? How do dominant love stories both reflect these assumptions, and actively create or legislate the boundaries of what may be desired? How may non-dominant (queer or interracial) love stories contest those boundaries, creating alternative narratives and possibilities? This course explores how notions of love, romance, marriage or sexual desire are structured by specific cultural and historical formations. We will closely analyze literature and film from a range of locations: British, American and postcolonial. Required texts: Jane Austen's Persuasion, Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Americanah, Shyam Selvadurai's Funny Boy.


FYS 179 – Rebellious Women

Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Kelly Anderson

This writing-intensive First Year Seminar will introduce students to the rebellious women who have changed the American social and political landscape through reform, mobilization, cultural interventions, and outright rebellion. Using Estelle Freedman's No Turning Back on the history of feminisms as our primary text, we will chronicle the history of feminist ideas and movements, interweaving historical change with contemporary debate. This course will use a variety of sources as our 'texts' in addition to Freedman and will rely heavily on primary sources from the Sophia Smith Collection. The intention of this seminar is threefold: 1) to provide an overview of feminist ideas and action throughout American history, 2) to introduce students to primary documents and research methods, and 3) to encourage reflection and discussion on current women's issues.


HST 209 – Aspects of Middle Eastern History:  Women and Gender in the Middle East Development

Tuesday, Friday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
TBA

Development of discourses on gender as well as lived experiences of women from the rise of Islam to the present. Topics include the politics of marriage, divorce, and reproduction; women’s political and economic participation; masculinity; sexuality; impact of Islamist movements. Provides introduction to main themes, and nuanced historical understanding of approaches to the study of gender in the region.


HST 223 – Women in Japanese History from Ancient Times to the 19th Century

Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Marnie Anderson

The dramatic transformation in gender relations is a key feature of Japan’s premodern history. How Japanese women and men have constructed norms of behavior in different historical periods, how gender differences were institutionalized in social structures and practices, and how these norms and institutions changed over time. The gendered experiences of women and men from different classes from approximately the seventh through the 19th centuries. Consonant with current developments in gender history, exploration of variables such as class, religion and political context that have affected women’s and men’s lives.


HST 252 – Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 1789-1918

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Darcy Buerkle

A survey of European women’s experiences and constructions of gender from the French Revolution through World War I, focusing on Western Europe. Gendered relationships to work, family, politics, society, religion and the body, as well as shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, as revealed in novels, films, treatises, letters, paintings, plays and various secondary sources.


HST 256 – Making of Colonial West Africa:  Race, Power, and Soceity

Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:20 p.m.
Jeffrey Ahlman
Component

This course provides a general, introductory survey of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century West African history, with a particular focus on the contradictions and complexities surrounding the establishment and lived experiences of colonial rule in the region. Key themes in the course include the interactive histories of race, family, religion, and gender in the exercise and negotiation of colonial power as well as the resistance to it. This course assumes no prior knowledge or experience with African history.


HST 265 – Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776-1861

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Pryor

Analysis of the historical realities, social movements, cultural expression and political debates that shaped U.S. citizenship from the Declaration of Independence to the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment. From the hope of liberty and equality to the exclusion of marginalized groups that made whiteness, maleness and native birth synonymous with Americanness. How African Americans, Native Americans, immigrants and women harnessed the Declaration of Independence and its ideology to define themselves as also citizens of the United States.


HST 350 – Gender, Race and the History of Human Rights in Post-1945 Europe

Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Darcy Buerkle

This course takes as its focus histories of humanitarianism and the beginnings of internationalism, while attending to the history of relevant gendered and racialized logics. Final projects will be developed early in the semester and informed by archival research.


HST 371 – Problems in 19-Century United States History:  Remembering Slavery:  A Gendered Reading of the WPA Slave Interviews

Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Elizabeth Pryor

Despite the particular degradation, violence and despair of enslavement in the United States, African American men and women built families, traditions and a legacy of resistance. Using the WPA interviews’ part of the New Deal Federal Writers Project of the 1930s, this course looks at the historical memory of former slaves by reading and listening to their own words. How did 70- through 90-year-old former slaves remember their childhoods and young adulthoods during slavery? And how do scholars make sense of these interviews given they were conducted when Jim Crow segregation was at its pinnacle? The course examines the WPA interviews as historical sources by studying scholarship that relies heavily on them. Most importantly, students explore debates that swirl around the interviews and challenge their validity on multiple fronts, even as they remain the richest sources of African American oral history regarding slavery. Students write an original research paper using the WPA interviews as their central source.


IDP 320 – Women’s Health in India, including Tibetans Living in Exile

Thursday  7:30-9:30 p.m.
Leslie Jaffe

This seminar examines women’s health and cultural issues within India, with a focus on Tibetan refugees, and then applies the knowledge experientially. During interterm, the students travel to India and deliver workshops on reproductive health topics to young Tibetan women living at the Central University of Tibetan Studies in Sarnath where they are further educated in Tibetan medicine. The seminar is by permission of the instructor with interested students required to write an essay explaining their interest and how the seminar furthers their educational goals. Attendance at a seminar info session is required to be eligible to apply.


PSY 266 – Psychology of Women and Gender

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Lauren Duncan

An in-depth examination of controversial issues of concern to the study of the psychology of women and gender. Students will be introduced to current psychological theory and empirical research relating to the existence, origins, and implications of behavioral similarities and differences associated with gender. We will examine the development of gender roles and stereotypes, power within the family, workplace, and politics, and women's mental health and sexuality, paying attention to social context, and intersectional identities.


REL 227 – Women and Gender in Jewish History

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Lois Dubin

An exploration of Jewish women's changing social roles, religious stances, and cultural expressions in a variety of historical settings from ancient to modern times.  How did Jewish women negotiate religious tradition, gender, and cultural norms to fashion lives for themselves as individuals and as family and community members in diverse societies? Readings from a wide range of historical, religious, theoretical, and literary works in order to address examples drawn from Biblical and rabbinic Judaism, medieval Islamic and Christian lands, modern Europe, America, and the Middle East.


SOC 219 – Medical Sociology

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Eeva Sointu
Component

This course analyzes -- and at times challenges -- the ways in which we understand health, illness and medicine. The course is divided in roughly three parts: first dealing with definitions and representations of health and illness, the second with the significance and impact of biomedical dominance, and the third with the intersections of health, illness and medicine with gender, race, social class and sexual orientation. The course encourages you to ask questions about the power exercised by various medical practitioners, and about the ways in which understandings of health and illness are neither natural nor neutral, but invested with culturally and historically specific meanings.


SOC 229 – Sex and Gender in American Society

Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Nancy Whittier

An examination of the ways in which the social system creates, maintains and reproduces gender dichotomies with specific attention to the significance of gender in interaction, culture and a number of institutional contexts, including work, politics, families and sexuality.


SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

This course engages with the various dimensions of globalization through the lens of gender, race, and class relations. We will study how gender and race intersect in global manufacturing and supply chains as well as in the transnational politics of representation and access in global media, culture, consumption, fashion, food, water, war and dissenting voices.


SOC 317 – Inequality in Higher Education

Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Tina Wildhagen
Component

This course applies a sociological lens to understanding inequality in American higher education. We examine how the conflicting purposes of higher education have led to a highly stratified system of colleges and universities. We also address the question of how students’ social class, race, ethnicity and gender affect their chances of successfully navigating this stratified system of higher education. Finally, we examine selected public policies aimed at minimizing inequality in students’ access to and success in college.


SPN 230 – Latin American and Peninsular Literature:  Creative Writing of Spain By and For Women

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Reyes Lazaro

This is a hinge course between beginning-intermediate and advanced-intermediate courses. Students will read and practice creative writing (essays and pieces of fiction) with the aid of fictional and biographical pieces written by Spanish women from the 12th century to our day. Its goal is to develop: students’ competence and self-confidence in the analysis of short and longer fiction in Spanish; knowledge of the history of women’s writing in Spain; and acquisition of linguistic and cultural literacy in Spanish through playful fiction writing.


SWG 203 – Queer of Color Critique

Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Jennifer Declue

Students in this course will gain a thorough and sustained understanding of queer of color critique by tracking this theoretical framework from its emergence in women of color feminism through the contemporary moment using historical and canonical texts along with the most cutting edge scholarship being produced in the field.  In our exploration of this critical framework we will engage with independent films, novels and short stories, popular music, as well as television and digital media platforms such as Netflix and Amazon. We will discuss what is ruptured and what is generated at intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality.


SWG 230 – Gender, Land and Food Movement

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:00-12:10 p.m.
Elisabeth Armstrong

We begin this course by sifting the earth between our fingers as part of a community learning partnership with area farms in Holyoke, Hadley and other neighboring towns. Using women’s movements and feminisms across the globe as our lens, this course develops an understanding of current trends in globalization. This lens also allows us to map the history of transnational connections between people, ideas and movements from the mid-20th century to the present. Through films, memoirs, fiction, ethnography, witty diatribes and graphic novels, this course explores women’s activism on the land of laborers, and in their lives. Students develop research projects in consultation with area farms, link their local research with global agricultural movements, write papers and give one oral presentation.


THE 217 – Modern European Drama I

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Leonard Berkman
component

The plays, theatres and playwrights of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Europe. A leap from Buchner to Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Wedekind and Gorky onwards to the widespread experimentation of the 1920s and earlier avant garde (e.g., Jarry, Artaud, Stein, Witkiewicz, Pirandello, Mayakovsky, Fleisser, early Brecht). Special attention to issues of gender, class, warfare and other personal/political foci. Attendance may be required at selected performances.


THE 221 – Rehearsing the Impossible: Black Women Playwrights Interrupting the Master Narrative

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Wednesday  7:00-10:00 p.m.

Building on the legacy of Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrienne Kennedy and Ntozake Shange, this course explores the work of Pearl Cleage, Lynne Nottage, Suzan Lori Parks, Anne D. Smith and other playwrights who from the 1950s to the present go about reinventing the narrative of America. We consider their theatrical/artistic production in the context of black feminism. As artists, audiences and critics grapple with the enduring legacy of minstrel storytelling in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, what were/are the particular artistic and intellectual challenges for these theatre artists? What are/were their strategies, missteps, triumphs?