STI vaccinations

HPV | Hepatitis B | Hepatitis A

 

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems, and nine out of 10 HPV infections go away by themselves within two years.  Sometimes HPV infections last longer and can cause certain cancers and other diseases including:

  • cancers of the cervix, vagina and vulva in women;
  • cancers of the penis in men; and
  • cancers of the anus and back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils, in women and men.

Vaccines can prevent some diseases caused by HPV.

graphic of immunization syringesHepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease caused by a virus. It's spread when an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid enters an uninfected person's body. This can happen during sex, by sharing drug-injection equipment or personal items like razors or toothbrushes, or through direct contact with an infected person's blood or open sores.

Symptoms include yellow skin or eyes, fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, joint pain, dark urine or clay-colored bowel movements. The majority of infected adults will develop symptoms, but you can spread the virus without having symptoms.

Many people are vaccinated as young children. The CDC recommends vaccinations for adults at risk, including those who are sexually active but not in a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship, men who have sex with men, people whose sex partners are infected, people who share needles or syringes, and people with HIV or chronic liver disease.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease caused by a virus. It's usually spread through the mouth, by contact with food, drinks or objects contaminated by the feces of an infected person. The illness can range from mild, lasting a few weeks, to severe, lasting several months.

Symptoms include yellow skin or eyes, tiredness, stomachache, loss of appetite or nausea. You can spread Hepatitis A without having symptoms.

Many people are vaccinated against the virus as young children. The CDC recommends vaccination for adults at risk, including those who live in or travel to areas where Hepatitis A is common, are men who have sex with men, use street drugs, have long-term liver disease, or who receive blood products to help their blood clot.