Former Director and Professor Emeritus—Tree-Fruit Horticulture

A headshot of Wesley Autio.
Until recently, Wes Autio served as the UMass Fruit Program Leader. He regularly interacts with tree-fruit farmers and the many individuals interested in tree fruit in the landscape. His research focuses on apple and peach rootstocks, controlling growth apple trees with mechanical and hormonal approaches, and chemical thinning of peaches. He teaches courses in pruning fruit crops for undergraduates and in statistical analysis for graduate students.
A headshot of Wesley Autio.

Professor Emeritus—Weed Science, Sustainable Turf Management

A headshot of Prasanta Bhowmik.
Professor Bhowmik's research interests include biology and management of perennial weeds, weed management strategies with emphasis on cultural practices, sequential applications, reduced rate use, organic products, and growth regulators, tolerance of turfgrass species and cultivars under NTEP to new registered herbicides, and evaluation of new herbicides and bio-control products.
A headshot of Prasanta Bhowmik.

Associate Professor—Greenhouse Crops and Floriculture

A headshot of Douglas Cox.
A headshot of Douglas Cox.

Professor Emeritus—Agronomy and Turfgrass Science

A headshot of J. Scott Ebdon.
Professor Ebdon's research interests include reducing water, fertilizer, and pesticide inputs in the maintenance of golf, sports and lawn turf, understanding the interaction between turfgrass species-cultivars with their natural and cultural environments, identifying cultivars with superior tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress, and developing sustainable practices to reduce turfgrass stress
A headshot of J. Scott Ebdon.

Professor Emeritus—Fruit Physiology, Horticulture Thinning & Varieties

A headshot of Duane Greene.
A headshot of Duane Greene.

Associate Professor—Greenhouse Crops, Post-Harvest Physiology

A headshot of Susan Han.
A headshot of Susan Han.

Extension Professor Emeritus—Vegetable Crop Horticulture & Marketing

A headshot of Frank Mangan.
My program implements outreach, teaching, and research to establish sustainable production practices on vegetable and herb crops grown by commercial farmers in the Northeastern United States. A growing focus of my program since 2000 has been on establishing production and marketing systems for vegetable and herb crops popular among the large and growing immigrant communities in this region, in particular native speakers of Spanish and Portuguese. Most of the research done by my program has been at the UMass Research Farm in Deerfield, Massachusetts, where we also evaluate practical postharvest and pest management strategies for these new crops. My program has also worked closely with nutritionists at UMass to provide nutritionally balanced and culturally appropriate recipes for these immigrant groups using locally grown fresh vegetables and herbs. Starting in 2011, we have begun to work with urban growers as part of an overall systems approach to provide fresh produce to urban populations in Massachusetts and the region.
A headshot of Frank Mangan.

Assistant to the Director

A headshot of Barbara Miller.
A headshot of Barbara Miller.

Professor—Entomology

A headshot of John Stoffolano.
My current research program involves using house fly as a model vector for various pathogens (E. coli and V. cholerae). Currently, I have the following research collaborative programs: The role of the adult crop of Musca domestica in vectoring the food pathogen E. coli (with Dr. Lynne McLandsborough, Food Science Dept.); The electrophysiology of the adult crop organ (Univ. of Cagliari, Italy, with Drs. Anna Liscia and Paolo Solari); Role of Phote-HrTH (Phormia terraenovae hypertrehalosemic hormone) and its analogues in modulating the supercontractile muscles of the crop of adult Phormia regina Meigen (with Dr. Gerd Gäde, University of Cape Town, South Africa); SEM/TEM of the adult crop organ of flies (with Drs. Anna Maria Fausto’s lab.); Role of various peptides on the adult crop organ muscles (with Dr. James Chambers, Univ. of Massachusetts, Chemistry Dept.); House fly as a vector of Vibrio cholerae (with Dr. Alix Purdy, Biology Dept., Amherst College. Projected collaborative projects include the following: Flies as vectors of pathogens in Italy (with Drs. Antonio Fasanella and Annuziata Giangaspero). Flies as vectors of pathogens in Egypt (with Dr. Ghada M. Lotfy El-Bassiony, Cairo University, Faculty of Science, Dept. of Entomology).
A headshot of John Stoffolano.

Professor Emeritus—Plant Pathology & Diagnostics

A headshot of Robert Wick.
My appointment to the University of Massachusetts includes extension, teaching and research. My major extension activities are in the Plant Disease Diagnostic Clinic and Nematode Assay Lab. The Plant Clinic provides support for the UMass Vegetable, Floriculture, Turf and Fruit IPM programs. My research program is targeted to the vegetable, floriculture and turf industries. Current research projects include late blight of potato and tomato, downy mildew of basil and cucurbits, Phytophthora blight of cucurbits, and management of nematodes in turf grasses. I am also working on a perennial canker disease of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) in Bangladesh. I teach Plant Pathology, Diagnostic Plant Pathology, Forest Pathology and Mycology. I have also taught courses in Turfgrass Pathology, Nematology and Biological Control of Plant Diseases. I taught Diagnostic Plant Pathology at Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU) twice, with the support of a Fulbright Scholar award in 2006 and 2014, and received a USDA grant to develop the first dedicated plant disease diagnostic clinic in Bangladesh.
A headshot of Robert Wick.

Professor Emeritus—Turfgrass Entomology

A headshot of Patricia Vittum.
A headshot of Patricia Vittum.