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Graduate Students

Santiago Vidales

svidales@spanport.umass.edu

Santiago Vidales was born in Bogotá. He holds a B.A. in philosophy and an M.A. in Latin American Studies. His M.A. thesis focused on Latin American (re)interpretations of Shakespeare’s The Tempest and how these processes are anchored in revolutionary politics. Since 2014 Santi has been working towards his Ph.D. in Latin American and Latinx Cultural Studies with an emphasis in Chicano and Vanguard poetry from the twentieth century. His dissertation on Chicano poet and activist Raúl Salinas aims to place Chicano poetry within, and as part of, the literary traditions of Latin America. By placing these traditions in conversation, the project also aims to rethink how bilingual poetry challenges and reinvigorates the Spanish poetic tradition going back to sixteenth-century Imperial Spain. Other intellectual passions of his include Colombian historical novels, novels about dictatorships in the Americas, and Caribbean short stories. He has taught all Spanish language courses in SpanPort as well as content classes and literature classes in Comparative Literature.

Carla Suárez Vega

csuarezvega@umass.edu

Website

Carla Suárez Vega holds a B.A. in English Studies from the Universidad de Oviedo, where she also obtained an M.A. in Gender and Diversity and an M.A. in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language. She joined the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program in the fall of 2015. Carla is interested in contemporary Iberian studies, especially on graphic narratives and film, from a the perspective of gender studies and queer theory. She has given papers at academic conferences on historical memory in graphic novels of the Spanish Civil War, transvestism, performance, and counterculture during the Spanish Transición, and queer urban space in Nazario’s Anarcoma and Rodrigo’s Manuel. Her dissertation focuses on queer culture and the production of queer subjectivities within the counterculture movements of the Spanish transition to democracy.