From The Guardian

EU bans Belarus planes from its airspace over activist arrest

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Move follows forced landing of Ryanair flight and detention of Raman Pratasevich last month

The EU has banned Belarusian carriers from its airspace and airports over the forced landing of Ryanair flight FR4978 and arrest of the opposition activist and journalist Raman Pratasevich.

EU ambassadors agreed during a meeting on Friday to require member states to deny the country’s carriers landing and taking off rights and forbid them from overflying the territory of the 27 member states from Saturday.

Related: Raman Pratasevich: the Belarus journalist captured by a fighter jet

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Belarus airs more footage of detained journalist as family call it ‘hostage’ video

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Supporters say Raman Pratasevich’s apparent confession was result of ‘abuse, torture and threats’

The family of the detained activist Raman Pratasevich and members of Belarus’s opposition have decried what they described as a “hostage” video after state television aired a primetime “interview” that they believe was filmed under duress.

In his third appearance since his Ryanair plane was forced to land in Belarus by the authorities on 23 May, Pratasevich appeared battered, with cuts on his wrists. During the appearance, he claimed that no makeup had been applied to hide marks from torture.

Related: Belarusian activist stabs himself in court

Related: ‘Persecuted, jailed, destroyed’: Belarus seeks to stifle dissent

Related: Belarus regime uses video confessions as a tool to silence dissent

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Hong Kong finds new ways to remember Tiananmen Square amid vigil ban

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Residents light candles, lay flowers and paint messages as police enforce ban on annual vigil for massacre

A man walked down a Hong Kong street on Friday wearing a shirt hand-painted with “There is nothing to say”. The previous night an artist held a placard aloft reading: “Don’t go to Victoria Park and light candles”.

On any other day these sights would have been confusing, but on Friday they were a small symbol of resistance to authorities’ efforts to stop anyone from commemorating the 4 June 1989 massacre of student protesters in Beijing.

streets of HK rn: “there is nothing 2 say” pic.twitter.com/dbxjQSWwIG

Artists gathered in Hong Kong the night before the 32nd anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre and commemorated the victims with different street performances. Photos: @StandNewsHK pic.twitter.com/CeTAJTyKyn

The night the goddess was taken onto campus and the controversy that ensued seems like it happened in a different world.
CUHK today, June 4th. pic.twitter.com/v2hhKbSw8v

Related: The Guardian view on remembering Tiananmen 1989: mourning for those who cannot | Editorial

Police surround an old man with a placard reading "conscience" outside Victoria Park, which was the venue of Hong Kong's June 4 vigil in previous years. The man was given a verbal warning, and officers followed him as he left. #Tiananmen32 pic.twitter.com/gltvkRZDjf

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Toppled Edward Colston statue goes on display in Bristol

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Sculpture of slave trader that was defaced in BLM protests last year forms part of exhibition

A statue of the slave trader Edward Colston that was toppled during a Black Lives Matter protest is to go on public display.

The bronze memorial to the 17th-century merchant had stood in the city since 1895, but was pulled from its plinth during the demonstration on 7 June last year.

Related: David Olusoga: I wanted to join protesters who tore down Colston statue

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By banning Tiananmen vigils in Hong Kong, China is trying to rewrite history | Louisa Lim

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The Communist party is widening its attack on the legacy of 1989 – and criminalising a new generation of activists

Over the weekend, a diminutive, white-haired woman carrying a yellow umbrella and a homemade cardboard sign saying “32, June 4, Tiananmen’s lament” was arrested on suspicion of taking part in an unlawful assembly. She had been marching along the pavement alone. This Kafkaesque scene happened not in China, but in Hong Kong. The fate of “Granny Wong”, a 65-year-old protest veteran called Alexandra Wong Fung-yiu, underlines the rapidity of Beijing’s clampdown in the city where, just two years ago, 180,000 people attended the annual vigil remembering the 1989 killings in and around Tiananmen Square in Beijing.

This year the Hong Kong vigil has been banned. Anyone gathering at the vigil site in Victoria Park on Friday could face five years in prison. Even publicising the event could lead to one year in jail under Hong Kong’s draconian National Security law, imposed sight unseen at the end of last June following a year of massive pro-democracy demonstrations. Public commemoration has become so risky that one Hong Kong newspaper even suggested writing the digits “64”, to commemorate the date of the protest, on light switches, so that flipping the switch became an act of remembrance. These moves underline the dangerous power of public memory, and how the events of 32 years ago still represent a suppurating sore at the moral heart of China’s Communist party.

Related: China will crush dissent in Hong Kong, just as it did in Tiananmen Square | Ma Jian

Louisa Lim is a senior lecturer in audio visual journalism at the University of Melbourne

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‘Mourn June 4 in your own way’: Tiananmen Square events vanish amid crackdowns and Covid

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Hong Kong, Macau and China ban gatherings, and Taiwan has a serious Covid outbreak, leaving people to remember the massacre alone or online

For the first time since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, there will be no formal commemoration event held in the Chinese-speaking world for the anniversary.

Thirty-two years after soldiers crushed student protests in Beijing and killed anywhere from several hundred to several thousand people, a combination of censorship, government crackdowns on criticism and pandemic restrictions will ensure no physical gathering is allowed in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Hong Kong, Macau or Taiwan.

Related: ‘No political story allowed’: Hong Kong broadcaster falls silent on sensitive subjects

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The Guardian view on remembering Tiananmen 1989: mourning for those who cannot | Editorial

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Beijing’s attempts to obliterate the memory of the massacre are extending their reach

When forgetting is compulsory, remembering can be a lonely business. Zhang Xianling’s 19-year-old son was shot in the head as Chinese troops bloodily suppressed the student-led protests that began in Tiananmen Square, Beijing, in 1989. In the 31 years since, she and other Tiananmen Mothers have campaigned in vain for an honest reckoning of the events of 4 June, while the Communist party’s imposed amnesia has made the subject utterly taboo on the mainland.

“So there is hope after all!” she exclaimed, when the scale and passion of Hong Kong’s annual vigil was described to her a few years ago. The event, attended by up to 180,000 at its peak, was the largest in the world and kept the memory of the killings alive on Chinese soil. But it will not happen this Thursday, and perhaps it will never happen again. The authorities have banned it for a second year running, purportedly due to coronavirus concerns – though other mass events continue, and authorities have warned that anyone who tries to participate could face five years in jail. Macau has acted similarly.

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‘A sacrificed generation’: psychological scars of Covid on young may have lasting impact

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Young people across Europe reveal how the pandemic has made them impatient for systemic change after bearing brunt of fallout

Covid-19 policies risk leaving psychological and socioeconomic scars on millions of young people across Europe, with far-reaching consequences for them and society, a wide-ranging Guardian project has revealed.

Teenagers and young adults expressed profound anxiety about their future and accused governments of failing them as 15 months of lockdowns destabilised their mental wellbeing, education and job prospects.

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People power, silenced – Inside the 4 June edition of Guardian Weekly

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From Belarus to Hong Kong, why is popular protest being crushed?
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Last August, thousands took to the streets of Belarus to bravely protest against rigged elections, in a mood of defiance and hope that the arm of the nation’s old strongman ruler, Alexander Lukashenko, could finally be bent. Instead, 10 months on, many of Lukashenko’s opponents have either fled the country or – in the shocking case of the journalist Raman Pratasevich last month – been detained in brutal circumstances.

In our big story this week, Andrew Roth looks at how Belarus has deployed a 21st-century reboot of the Soviet-era playbook to crush internal dissent, while Will Hutton reflects on why people power is failing, from Minsk to Hong Kong, and why we should all be concerned.

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Hong Kong’s 4 June Tiananmen vigil over the years – in pictures

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For decades, Hong Kong has been one of just two cities in China allowed to mark the deadly crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Tiananmen Square in Beijing in 1989. On 4 June each year, thousands have gathered in Victoria Park in Hong Kong to mourn the victims of the crackdown, lighting candles and singing songs in remembrance. This year, however, Hong Kong authorities have banned the vigil for the second consecutive year, citing social distancing restrictions and public health risks from the coronavirus pandemic. Critics say authorities are using the pandemic as an excuse to silence pro-democracy voices in Hong Kong as Beijing tightens its control over the semi-autonomous city after months of anti-government protests in 2019. Last year, thousands gathered in Victoria Park despite the ban and police warnings. Weeks later, police arrested more than 20 activists who took part in the vigil. Organisers have urged residents to mark the anniversary in private this year by lighting a candle at home

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Memphis exhumes body of Klan leader Nathan Bedford Forrest from city park

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  • Remains of Confederate general and wife will be relocated
  • Forrest owned enslaved people and led the Ku Klux Klan

Workers have begun digging up the remains of a Confederate general, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and moving the former slave trader’s body from a park in Memphis, Tennessee, to a museum hundreds of miles away.

Related: The Kidnapping Club and A Shot in the Moonlight reviews – slavery’s long shadow

Related: Battlefield visitor nearly meets his Waterloo in Gettysburg public toilet

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Peter Tatchell’s life on film: ‘So far I’ve been violently assaulted 300 times’

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Peter Tatchell has protested against everyone from Mike Tyson to Tony Blair. So what did the human rights campaigner make of the Netflix documentary Hating Peter Tatchell?

The title of Hating Peter Tatchell was the brainchild of its director, Christopher Amos. When, in 2015, he first became interested in making a documentary about my 54 years of LGBTQ+ and other human rights activism, he was taken aback by the volume and ferocity of hatred against me.

So far I’ve been violently assaulted over 300 times, had 50 attacks on my flat, been the victim of half a dozen murder plots and received tens of thousands of hate messages and death threats over the last five decades, mostly from homophobes and far-right extremists. Amos envisaged a film that documented how and why my campaigns generated such extreme hatred.

The writer is the director of Peter Tatchell Foundation. Hating Peter Tatchell is out now on Netflix.

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Belarusian activist stabs himself in court

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Stsiapan Latypau carried out unconscious after claiming he was pressured to plead guilty

A Belarusian opposition activist stabbed himself in the throat with a pen during a court hearing after claiming investigators had pressured him to plead guilty or face his family and friends being arrested.

Footage from Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty showed Stsiapan Latypau, who has organised protests against the country’s authoritarian leader, Alexander Lukashenko, lying inside a defendant’s cage as witnesses screamed in a courtroom in Minsk.

Related: ‘Persecuted, jailed, destroyed’: Belarus seeks to stifle dissent

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Eve: the off-grid life of a nine-year-old climate activist

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Filmmakers Joya Berrow and Lucy Jane discuss their carbon-conscious approach to making their documentary about Eve and her community

A new Guardian documentary, Eve, follows a nine-year-old girl on her journey back to mainstream schooling after moving to Tinkers Bubble, the oldest off-grid community in the UK. As she grapples with the fear of what her peers might think of her passion for the environment and her determination to have her voice heard, we gain an intimate and intergenerational perspective of what it really means to move a family off grid.

The film was made with the support of the BFI Doc Society Fund and the Climate Story Labs. The filmmakers, Joya Berrow and Lucy Jane, set out with the clear objective of making the entire production carbon conscious. The Tinkers Bubble community is committed to living fossil-fuel free and has been beyond carbon neutral for 25 years. We find out more about its approach to sustainable filmmaking and the lessons learned along the way.

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Man in Black at 50: Johnny Cash’s empathy is needed more than ever

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The country star is not always remembered for his politics, but his about-face to withdraw support for Nixon and the Vietnam war may be his finest moment

“I speak my mind in a lot of these songs,” Johnny Cash wrote in the liner notes to the album Man in Black, released 50 years ago today. He might be better known now for the outlaw songs of his youth or the reckonings with death in his final recordings, but Cash used his 1971 album to set out his less-discussed political vision: long on feeling and empathy, and short on ideology and partisanship. The United States seemed hopelessly polarised, and Cash confronted that division head-on, demanding more of his fellow citizens and Christians amid the apparently endless war in Vietnam.

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Hong Kong’s ‘Grandma Wong’ arrested for solo Tiananmen protest

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Detention of of veteran pro-democracy activist clear sign of authorities’ zero tolerance to protest

Police in Hong Kong have arrested a 65-year-old democracy activist as she staged a lone demonstration over China’s deadly Tiananmen crackdown, in a vivid illustration of the zero tolerance wielded by authorities towards protest in the financial hub.

Alexandra Wong was detained on Sunday on suspicion of taking part in an unlawful assembly as she walked towards Beijing’s liaison office in Hong Kong.

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Uganda police killings reconstructed using mobile phone footage

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Interviews with more than 30 witnesses also used in investigation by BBC Africa Eye into deaths in Kampala

A single truck carrying eight police officers was responsible for a mass shooting in the centre of the Ugandan capital, Kampala, in November last year in which at least four people died and many more were injured, an investigation by BBC Africa Eye has found.

The shootings were part of a crackdown on protests in Kampala following the arrest of opposition leader Robert Kyagulanyi, a singer turned politician known as Bobi Wine, who was campaigning as a candidate for presidential elections held two months later.

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Anti-vaccine passport protesters storm Westfield mall in London

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Shopping centre in Shepherd’s Bush had to shut after hundreds of marchers arrived chanting ‘no more lockdowns’

Hundreds of anti-vaccine passport protesters invaded the Westfield shopping centre in Shepherd’s Bush on Saturday evening at the culmination of a mass march that drew many thousands and snaked miles through central and west London.

There were tussles with police who tried to block access through one entrance to the shopping centre at about 6pm, before protesters quickly realised that another door just yards away was unguarded.

Hundreds of #NoVaccinePassports protesters briefly occupied Westfield pic.twitter.com/wbCf9uWJQE

Organisers didn’t lie when they promised a different route to usual. #NoVaccinePassports #londonprotest now heading past Notting Hill Gate into west London. pic.twitter.com/WZMgqNIjuQ

Related: Anger in Met after violence at London anti-lockdown protest

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Anti-vaccine protesters temporarily close Westfield shopping centre in Shepherd's Bush – video

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Anti-vaccine and anti-lockdown protesters were forced back by police officers as they stormed Westfield shopping centre in Shepherd’s Bush, west London. The incident occurred after a mass march snaking about 12 miles through London, starting in Parliament Square and reaching as far west as Hammersmith. The Metropolitan Police temporarily closed the Westfield shopping centre as a result of the protest.

‘The 3rd demo is now at Westfield and is causing significant disruption to the local community and businesses,’ The Metropolitan police event twitter account posted. ‘The MPS strongly urge those who are taking part in this demo to go home. Failure to do so may result in enforcement action being taken’

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'No to dictatorship': thousands of Brazilians rally against Bolsonaro – video

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Brazilians staged protests against President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the Covid-19 pandemic in at least 200 cities and towns across the country on Saturday, carrying signs such as 'Out with Bolsonaro' and 'Impeachment now'.

Bolsonaro's popularity has plummeted during the coronavirus crisis, which has killed more than 450,000 Brazilians as the far-right leader played down its severity, dismissed mask wearing and cast doubt on the importance of vaccines.

Organised by leftist political parties, unions and student associations, Saturday's protests in the capital, Brasilia, and in Rio de Janeiro were peaceful but in the north-eastern city of Recife, police threw teargas and shot rubber bullets.

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