From The Guardian

Iran says Bahrain has crossed line by stripping Shia cleric of citizenship

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Revolutionary Guards commander says Manama’s move against Ayatollah Isa Qassim will trigger armed resistance

Bahrain has stripped the spiritual leader of the kingdom’s Shia Muslim majority of his citizenship, resulting in protests outside his home and furious threats by neighbouring Iran over the escalating repression.

The move against Ayatollah Isa Qassim comes less than a week after a court banned the country’s main opposition group, al-Wefaq, accusing it of fomenting sectarian unrest and having links to a foreign power – a clear reference to Iran, which is a fierce critic of Bahrain’s Sunni monarchy.

Related: Bahrain detains rights activist as UN official criticises repression

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Classic account of Soweto revolt in 1976 | Letters

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In your article on the Soweto revolt (40 years on, victims reflect on Soweto uprising, 16 June), I was surprised to find no reference to Baruch Hirson’s classic account of the revolt, Year of Fire, Year of Ash, first published by Zed Books in 1979 and recently reissued.

It not only gives a detailed description of the uprising in Soweto in 1976, but also shows that this was part of wider opposition to apartheid, as well as tracing the history of protest against African educational institutions in South Africa dating back to the 1920s.

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Three environmental activists killed each week in 2015

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Global Witness figures show last year was the deadliest for environment and land campaigners since 2002

Three environmental activists were killed per week last year, murdered defending land rights and the environment from mining, dam projects and logging, a campaign group said on Monday.

In 16 countries surveyed in a report by Global Witness, 185 activists were killed, making 2015 the deadliest year for environment and land campaigners since 2002.

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Indonesia accused of arresting more than 1,000 in West Papua

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Activists say detentions taking place during rallies calling for independence referendum

Indonesian police have been accused of arresting more than 1,000 people at rallies in West Papua demanding an independence referendum.

Part of Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province on New Guinea island, West Papua is ethnically distinct from the rest of the country and was annexed by Indonesia in 1969. Many Papuans consider the takeover to have been an illegal land grab.

Related: West Papua: UN must supervise vote on independence, says coalition

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Councils or company bosses, those in power have a duty of stewardship | Letters from Paul Nicolson and Les Bright

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Related: More freeloaders than free market. How Britain bails out the business chiefs | Aditya Chakrabortty

Aditya Chakrabortty (Opinion, 14 June) compared my appearance before a Tottenham magistrate [for refusing to pay council tax in protest against cuts to social security] with Philip Green’s appearance before MPs. It is an apt comparison. In both cases the authorities failed to take steps to prevent the kind of disasters facing the pensioners of BHS or the benefit claimants of the London borough of Haringey.

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Bahrain paying for Royal Navy base despite human rights criticism

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New base in Gulf funded by kingdom recently condemned for arresting activists and shutting down opposition party

The Bahrain government, under renewed international criticism for arresting human rights activists and closing down an opposition party this week, is paying the bulk of the costs of the construction of a new Royal Navy base in Bahrain, a freedom of information request has revealed.

The precise value of the Bahrain contribution is being kept secret under UK government disclosure rules, but the UK is to pay only £9m over three years towards the construction of the new naval base central to the UK government’s new “East of Suez” strategy. The contract for the Mina Salman support facility was signed in 2014. It is currently under construction and is designed to service all Royal Navy ships in the region.

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Demonstration in Paris against the labour law reforms – in pictures

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Labour unions demonstrated during a national strike across France to protest against employment law reforms in the so-called El Khomri bill. According to the police department, around 80,000 people attended the demonstration and 29 riot police officers and 11 demonstrators were injured with 58 arrested.

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Paper cranes too scary for Trident police | Letter

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I have just returned from a peace camp at AWE Burghfield, near Reading, where actions are taking place throughout June in protest at the government’s intention to replace the Trident nuclear weapons system (Report, 8 June). Ministry of Defence police have generally been friendly and restrained, but there is one remarkable sticking point – they don’t like paper cranes.

The story of the paper crane and its significance for the anti-nuclear movement is poignant. Sadako Sasaki survived the bombing of Hiroshima, but developed leukaemia 10 years later. Her hospital room-mate told her of the Japanese legend that whoever makes 1,000 origami paper cranes will be granted a wish. Sadako decided to do this before she died, aged 12. Her wish was for world peace.

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Papua New Guinea shootings: university wins injunction banning further protests

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Injunction comes after after police open fire on students demonstrating against prime minister Peter O’Neill

The University of Papua New Guinea has won a court injunction banning further protests after police opened fire on students demonstrating against the country’s prime minister and government on Wednesday, shooting at least eight.

The students’ simmering five-week protest demanding the resignation of Peter O’Neill over corruption allegations reached a brutal zenith on Wednesday, when students tried to board buses on campus to travel to Parliament House – where parliament was sitting – to protest and to present a petition to the PM.

Related: Papua New Guinea's students have a point. Peter O'Neill should talk to them, not send police | Jonathan Pyke

Related: Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

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Cosmetics company Lancôme accused of kowtowing to Chinese government - video

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Protesters on Wednesday accuse Lancôme, the face-cream company owned by the French cosmetics giant L’Oréal, of caving in to the Chinese government after it cancelled a promotional concert in Hong Kong that was to feature pro-democracy singer Denise Ho

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Papua New Guinea student protesters flee police – video

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Student demonstrators run from police in the capital Port Moresby on Wednesday. Four people were reportedly killed when police opened fire into a crowd of protesters. The students have been boycotting classes for five weeks, demanding that the prime minister, Peter O’Neill, resign over corruption allegations

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Papua New Guinea's students have a point. Peter O'Neill should talk to them, not send police | Jonathan Pyke

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The reported killing of four students on Wednesday follows a month of student protests in which the prime minister refused to meet students

History is repeating itself in Papua New Guinea. The reported killing of four students on Wednesday follows the death of three others at the hands of the police in similar circumstances in 2001. This latest event comes after more than a month of protests from students calling for the resignation of Peter O’Neill.

The students say the prime minister is no longer fit for office, citing multiple criminal investigations against him, attempts to shut down the police force’s corruption unit, and poor fiscal management. To date O’Neill has refused to meet student representatives, arguing that they should leave these matters to the courts and return to their studies. Even before Wednesday’s events it was difficult to see how this approach would de-escalate the situation.

Related: Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

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Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

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Despite reports of deaths after clashes at a university in Port Moresby, embattled prime minister Peter O’Neill says students were only injured

Police in Papua New Guinea have reportedly killed four people after “firing directly” into a crowd of student protesters in the capital Port Moresby as long-running anti-corruption protests descended suddenly into violence.

Opposition MPs told parliament that four students had been killed and seven injured in the incident on Wednesday, but the government insisted the demonstrators were only injured and that police fired only warning shots.

Related: PNG police shooting: four reported dead after officers fire on student rally – latest

Related: Papua New Guinea: four students reported dead after police open fire on march

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Papua New Guinea shooting: four reported dead after police fire on rally – latest

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Reports emerge from Port Moresby at least four students have died after police blocked attempts to march on parliament in protest against the PM

3.27am BST

Australia’s foreign minister, Julie Bishop, has called for calm.

“We are still trying to determine whether there have been deaths and how many have been injured,” Bishop said.

3.16am BST

PNG’s parliament is currently in session. According to reports they have been told of four deaths following hte shooting, and seven injuries.

Prime minister Peter O’Neill has also faced questions regarding calls for his resignation. He has refused. I’ll bring you more background on this shortly, but essentially O’Neill is facing increasing opposition stemming from a two-year-old arrest warrant he has so far managed to avoid.

3.09am BST

The Port Moresby General hospital’s accident and emergency wing is treating a number of students, but other clinics have been closed to the public.

Other students said tear gas was fired into the crowd. Video purporting to be from the rally shows plumes of white smoke over the crowd and the sound of gunfire.

Footage of shots being fired #upng #PNG @prawn_gravies pic.twitter.com/aiDpNH96o3

3.01am BST

Welcome to our live coverage of a developing situation in Papua New Guinea, where police are reported to have opened fire on university protesters in the capital city Port Moresby.

The PNG parliament has been told four students are dead, the ABC has reported. Another 10 are in hospital.

Related: Papua New Guinea: four students reported dead after police open fire on march

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Papua New Guinea: four students reported dead after police open fire on march

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Police reportedly shoot dead at least four students in Port Moresby after blocking their attempts to march on parliament

At least four people are believed killed after police shot at a crowd of university student protesters attempting to march on the Papua New Guinea parliament, according to reports.

Reports and photographs accusing the police of opening fire on protesters emerged on social media on Wednesday morning. The Guardian has confirmed a number of students are being treated in hospital following the shooting.

#PNG parliament told 4 people killed in this morning's university shootings

Spoke to students and informed that several were shot. 1 died in UPNG unconfirmed. Issue started with arguement between Met Supt n student.

Footage of shots being fired #upng #PNG @prawn_gravies pic.twitter.com/aiDpNH96o3

Police in PNG have shot uni students who were trying to march on parliament. Unconfirmed reports one has died @abcnews @RAPacificBeat

Related: Papua New Guinea police barricade anti-fraud squad head's office, say reports

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Lonely struggle of India's anti-nuclear protesters | Vidhi Doshi

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Women are leading protests in Tamil Nadu state against a power plant – yet few people in India know the village they’re from, let alone support their cause

Behind the Lourdes Matha church in Idinthakarai, a fishing village at the southern tip of India, five women have abandoned their chores to protest at the Kudankulam nuclear power plant. Today is day 1,754 of their relay hunger strike, which began when the plant was fuelled in 2011.

Celine, 73, is among the five protestors, who take it in turns to go without food. “Not a single government, not a single political party is willing to take up our cause,” she says. “Only Mother Mary can save us now.”

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Trump/Nixon: will 2016 make us witnesses to another revolution?

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In 1969, a divisive president appealed to the ‘silent majority’. As the new Republican nominee invokes the phrase, a new oral history offers lessons

On 3 November 1969, as the Vietnam war and protests against it raged on, Richard Nixon addressed a divided nation. At the end of his 31-minute speech, he coined a phrase that stuck.

Related: Trump ends California swing marked by bold remarks, criticism and violence

Related: 1968 and all that: how Donald Trump channels the spirit of a most violent year

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Tiananmen vigil ignored by some Hong Kong activists amid ideological split

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Thousands gather every year to mark China’s brutal suppression of pro-democracy protests but some say the vigil’s message is growing irrelevant

Young activists will turn their backs on Hong Kong’s commemoration of the bloody Tiananmen Square crackdown on Saturday amid growing calls in the city for greater autonomy from China.

The vigil, which each year draws tens of thousands of people, has caused a widening rift in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy camp between those who believe the victims of the crackdown should be remembered and those who see the event’s message as increasingly irrelevant.

Related: Families of Tiananmen Square victims accuse Beijing of three decades of 'white terror'

Related: Hong Kong's Tiananmen museum to close amid claims of China pressure

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Generation revolution: how Egypt’s military state betrayed its youth | Rachel Aspden

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Two years after protests unseated the dictator Hosni Mubarak, a 15-year-old girl in Cairo was ready to risk her life to defeat her country’s brutal army. And she was not alone

Ruqayah crouched behind a sandbag wall, blinking away the sweat running into her eyes. The sun was directly overhead and the acrid smell of burning plastic stung the back of her throat. Shouts and screams rose thinly over gunfire, helicopter rotors and the rumble of armoured bulldozers.

It was the middle of August 2013, soon after the Eid feast that marks the end of Ramadan, and the security forces were clearing the huge protest camps at Rabaa and al-Nahda squares in central Cairo. Their tens of thousands of inhabitants were demonstrating against the removal of the president, Mohamed Morsi, in a military coup at the beginning of July. Beside Ruqayah huddled another teenage girl and a young man, pressed as close as they could get to the rough hessian of the sandbags. To the side, sprawled on the concrete with blood pooling around them, lay the bodies of two men who had been shot dead by police snipers.

Around Ruqayah, young men began crying to God for help. At midnight, they heard shooting in the darkness

To the majority, Rabaa seemed trapped in time, a fragment of an unworkable past. But to Ruqayah, it was a utopia

Tanks and personnel carriers sat at Cairo's major intersections, their guns trained down the main streets

Sisi became president in May 2014 with 96.9% of the vote, but his leadership brought a succession of disasters

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