From The Guardian

Pro-remain rallies cancelled over safety fears

The Guardian | Protest -

Events planned for Tuesday night in Manchester, Oxford, Liverpool and London are put on hold

Rallies organised to protest against the EU referendum result have been cancelled due to fears over safety.

More than 2,000 people were planning to attend the Manchester Stays rally, due to be held in Albert Square on Tuesday evening. Organisers have cancelled the event, explaining the “safety of all individuals cannot be guaranteed”.

Related: Brexit news live: Farage tells MEPs 'most of you have never done a proper job'

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Karl Dallas obituary

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Influential music journalist, singer, songwriter and political radical who played a key role in the folk scene of the 1950s and 60s

Karl Dallas, who has died aged 85, was a journalist, singer, songwriter and political activist who had a crucial role in the emerging folk scene of the 1950s and 60s. A colourful radical with a remarkably wide range of interests and eclectic musical taste, he went on to write about folk-rock and rock music. As a peace campaigner who became a Christian in his 50s, he joined the human shield group which travelled to Iraq before the start of the war in 2003 to “try to convince the world that you can’t bomb a country into democracy”.

Dallas’s political stance seemed predetermined from the day he was born, in Acton, west London, when his staunchly socialist parents, Nancy (nee Knowles) and Jack, registered him as a member of the Labour party and named him Karl Frederick (after Marx and Engels). As he explained in his song Necessity: “My father was an engineer, my mother was a clerk.” He showed a rebel streak from an early age, helped by Nancy, who took him on his first demonstration, against Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement of Hitler, when he was seven. Evacuated to Northumberland during the blitz, he made his way back to Acton and remained in London for the remainder of the second world war.

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Corbyn heckled at Pride in London - video

The Guardian | Protest -

Arriving at the Pride march in London on Saturday morning, the Labour party leader is confronted by protesters after holding a press conference on the impact of Brexit. Twitter user Tom Mauchline posted three videos during which he is heard accusing Corbyn of failing to get enough remain votes and demanding he resigns. Corbyn replies: ‘I did all I could’

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Donald Trump flies in for Scotland visit as protesters converge on Turnberry

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Demonstrations including aerial banner and mariachi band planned at golf resort, while Scottish leaders refuse to meet presumptive Republican candidate

Donald Trump is scheduled to land at Glasgow Prestwick airport after dawn on Friday for the start of a two-day visit to Scotland. He will be greeted with far-from-traditional Scottish hospitality, with no senior British or Scottish politicians prepared to meet him and protesters preparing noisy and colourful demonstrations.

US presidential candidates normally go on foreign trips to establish their foreign policy credentials, with pictures taken with world leaders for use later in the election campaign. But this is the only international trip that Trump has made since launching his bid for the White House and it is for business purposes: to formally open his newly refurbished Turnberry golf resort in Ayrshire and to pop into his other golf course resort, north of Aberdeen.

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I wanted to take a stand for remain – so I flyposted Ukip’s office | Laura Barton

The Guardian | Protest -

In such a close-run referendum, visibly declaring your allegiance seems important. Armed with paper and red felt tips I turned to (polite) direct action

I had been contemplating taking action for some while. Flyers? I wondered. A demonstration? For a time I thought I might post kippers through their letterbox, though my friends soon pointed out that this would be a waste of good fish.

I live, you see, not very far from the Ukip office in Thanet, an area of the country considered the party’s heartland, and where Nigel Farage stood but failed to get elected in the 2015 election. As a staunch supporter of the remain campaign, in the weeks leading up to the EU referendum the office’s proximity has proved a source of temptation.

In my small town I know Spanish, French, Italian immigrants, eastern Europeans – I'm a Brit, but a newcomer still

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Why is the Bolivian government turning water cannon on disabled protesters?

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A long-running protest over benefits has resulted in a heavy-handed response by police in Bolivia. Where will it end?

It is mid-afternoon on the central La Paz street, Mariscal Santa Cruz, but there is no traffic. Spread across the street are people wearing nothing but nappies. Behind them, three rows of police have built a wall of riot shields that stretches from one side of the road to the other.

Scrawled on their chests in black marker are the words “Renta mensual 500BS” (monthly benefit 500Bs). These are Bolivia’s disability rights campaigners, and their core demand is a monthly government benefit of 500 bolivianos (about £50). They say this would help people with severe disabilities to live with dignity and independence. In Bolivia, 500Bs per month is enough to rent a flat.

After we fall out of our wheelchairs, we can’t get back up. But still, they kept shooting us with jets

Related: The moment I felt excluded because of my disability – share your stories

Related: We need to stop treating people with disabilities as less than human

Related: 'Being classified as a terrorist threat makes me feel excluded'

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Iran says Bahrain has crossed line by stripping Shia cleric of citizenship

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Revolutionary Guards commander says Manama’s move against Ayatollah Isa Qassim will trigger armed resistance

Bahrain has stripped the spiritual leader of the kingdom’s Shia Muslim majority of his citizenship, resulting in protests outside his home and furious threats by neighbouring Iran over the escalating repression.

The move against Ayatollah Isa Qassim comes less than a week after a court banned the country’s main opposition group, al-Wefaq, accusing it of fomenting sectarian unrest and having links to a foreign power – a clear reference to Iran, which is a fierce critic of Bahrain’s Sunni monarchy.

Related: Bahrain detains rights activist as UN official criticises repression

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Classic account of Soweto revolt in 1976 | Letters

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In your article on the Soweto revolt (40 years on, victims reflect on Soweto uprising, 16 June), I was surprised to find no reference to Baruch Hirson’s classic account of the revolt, Year of Fire, Year of Ash, first published by Zed Books in 1979 and recently reissued.

It not only gives a detailed description of the uprising in Soweto in 1976, but also shows that this was part of wider opposition to apartheid, as well as tracing the history of protest against African educational institutions in South Africa dating back to the 1920s.

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Three environmental activists killed each week in 2015

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Global Witness figures show last year was the deadliest for environment and land campaigners since 2002

Three environmental activists were killed per week last year, murdered defending land rights and the environment from mining, dam projects and logging, a campaign group said on Monday.

In 16 countries surveyed in a report by Global Witness, 185 activists were killed, making 2015 the deadliest year for environment and land campaigners since 2002.

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Indonesia accused of arresting more than 1,000 in West Papua

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Activists say detentions taking place during rallies calling for independence referendum

Indonesian police have been accused of arresting more than 1,000 people at rallies in West Papua demanding an independence referendum.

Part of Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province on New Guinea island, West Papua is ethnically distinct from the rest of the country and was annexed by Indonesia in 1969. Many Papuans consider the takeover to have been an illegal land grab.

Related: West Papua: UN must supervise vote on independence, says coalition

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Councils or company bosses, those in power have a duty of stewardship | Letters from Paul Nicolson and Les Bright

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Related: More freeloaders than free market. How Britain bails out the business chiefs | Aditya Chakrabortty

Aditya Chakrabortty (Opinion, 14 June) compared my appearance before a Tottenham magistrate [for refusing to pay council tax in protest against cuts to social security] with Philip Green’s appearance before MPs. It is an apt comparison. In both cases the authorities failed to take steps to prevent the kind of disasters facing the pensioners of BHS or the benefit claimants of the London borough of Haringey.

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Bahrain paying for Royal Navy base despite human rights criticism

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New base in Gulf funded by kingdom recently condemned for arresting activists and shutting down opposition party

The Bahrain government, under renewed international criticism for arresting human rights activists and closing down an opposition party this week, is paying the bulk of the costs of the construction of a new Royal Navy base in Bahrain, a freedom of information request has revealed.

The precise value of the Bahrain contribution is being kept secret under UK government disclosure rules, but the UK is to pay only £9m over three years towards the construction of the new naval base central to the UK government’s new “East of Suez” strategy. The contract for the Mina Salman support facility was signed in 2014. It is currently under construction and is designed to service all Royal Navy ships in the region.

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Demonstration in Paris against the labour law reforms – in pictures

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Labour unions demonstrated during a national strike across France to protest against employment law reforms in the so-called El Khomri bill. According to the police department, around 80,000 people attended the demonstration and 29 riot police officers and 11 demonstrators were injured with 58 arrested.

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Paper cranes too scary for Trident police | Letter

The Guardian | Protest -

I have just returned from a peace camp at AWE Burghfield, near Reading, where actions are taking place throughout June in protest at the government’s intention to replace the Trident nuclear weapons system (Report, 8 June). Ministry of Defence police have generally been friendly and restrained, but there is one remarkable sticking point – they don’t like paper cranes.

The story of the paper crane and its significance for the anti-nuclear movement is poignant. Sadako Sasaki survived the bombing of Hiroshima, but developed leukaemia 10 years later. Her hospital room-mate told her of the Japanese legend that whoever makes 1,000 origami paper cranes will be granted a wish. Sadako decided to do this before she died, aged 12. Her wish was for world peace.

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Papua New Guinea shootings: university wins injunction banning further protests

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Injunction comes after after police open fire on students demonstrating against prime minister Peter O’Neill

The University of Papua New Guinea has won a court injunction banning further protests after police opened fire on students demonstrating against the country’s prime minister and government on Wednesday, shooting at least eight.

The students’ simmering five-week protest demanding the resignation of Peter O’Neill over corruption allegations reached a brutal zenith on Wednesday, when students tried to board buses on campus to travel to Parliament House – where parliament was sitting – to protest and to present a petition to the PM.

Related: Papua New Guinea's students have a point. Peter O'Neill should talk to them, not send police | Jonathan Pyke

Related: Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

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Cosmetics company Lancôme accused of kowtowing to Chinese government - video

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Protesters on Wednesday accuse Lancôme, the face-cream company owned by the French cosmetics giant L’Oréal, of caving in to the Chinese government after it cancelled a promotional concert in Hong Kong that was to feature pro-democracy singer Denise Ho

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Papua New Guinea student protesters flee police – video

The Guardian | Protest -

Student demonstrators run from police in the capital Port Moresby on Wednesday. Four people were reportedly killed when police opened fire into a crowd of protesters. The students have been boycotting classes for five weeks, demanding that the prime minister, Peter O’Neill, resign over corruption allegations

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Papua New Guinea's students have a point. Peter O'Neill should talk to them, not send police | Jonathan Pyke

The Guardian | Protest -

The reported killing of four students on Wednesday follows a month of student protests in which the prime minister refused to meet students

History is repeating itself in Papua New Guinea. The reported killing of four students on Wednesday follows the death of three others at the hands of the police in similar circumstances in 2001. This latest event comes after more than a month of protests from students calling for the resignation of Peter O’Neill.

The students say the prime minister is no longer fit for office, citing multiple criminal investigations against him, attempts to shut down the police force’s corruption unit, and poor fiscal management. To date O’Neill has refused to meet student representatives, arguing that they should leave these matters to the courts and return to their studies. Even before Wednesday’s events it was difficult to see how this approach would de-escalate the situation.

Related: Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

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Four students reported dead after police fire on protest in Papua New Guinea

The Guardian | Protest -

Despite reports of deaths after clashes at a university in Port Moresby, embattled prime minister Peter O’Neill says students were only injured

Police in Papua New Guinea have reportedly killed four people after “firing directly” into a crowd of student protesters in the capital Port Moresby as long-running anti-corruption protests descended suddenly into violence.

Opposition MPs told parliament that four students had been killed and seven injured in the incident on Wednesday, but the government insisted the demonstrators were only injured and that police fired only warning shots.

Related: PNG police shooting: four reported dead after officers fire on student rally – latest

Related: Papua New Guinea: four students reported dead after police open fire on march

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