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Seminars

All seminars are in room 201 Stockbridge Hall unless otherwise indicated. For more information contact Emily Wang (emilywang "at" resecon.umass.edu, 545-5741).

Spring 2015
Friday, April 3, 2015
3:30 - 5:00 PM
ROOM 303 STOCKBRIDGE HALL

Shadi Atallah
Assistant Professor, Ecological/Resource Economics and Sustainability
Departments of Forestry and Natural Resources and Agricultural Economics
Purdue University

Spatial-dynamic externalities and strategic behavior in infectious disease control: application to vineyards >>pdf

Friday, April 17, 2015
3:30 - 5:00 PM
ROOM 303 STOCKBRIDGE HALL
Chris O'Donnell
Professor of Economics
School of Economics, University of Queensland

Using Information About Technologies, Markets and Firm Behaviour to Decompose a Proper Productivity Index (forthcoming: Journal of Econometrics).

Abstract: This paper uses distance functions to define new output and input quantity indexes that satisfy important axioms from index number theory (e.g., identity, transitivity, proportionality and time-space reversal). Dividing the output index by the input index yields a new productivity index that can be decomposed into a measure of technical change, a measure of environmental change, and several measures of efficiency change. The problem with this new index is that it cannot be computed without estimating the production frontier. The paper shows how assumptions concerning technologies, markets and firm behaviour can be used to inform the estimation process. The focus is on the asymptotic properties of least squares estimators when the explanatory variables in production frontier models are endogenous. In this case, the ordinary least squares estimator is usually inconsistent. However, there is one situation where it is super-consistent. A fully-modified ordinary least squares estimator is also available in this case. To illustrate some of the main ideas, the paper uses U.S. state-level farm data to estimate a stochastic production frontier. The parameter estimates are then used to obtain estimates of the economically-relevant components of productivity change.

Friday, April 24, 2015
3:30 - 5:00 PM

Frans P de Vries
Professor of Economics
University of Stirling, Scotland UK

Dynamic Efficiency in Experimental Emissions Trading Markets with Investment Uncertainty >>pdf

Fall 2014
Friday, October 3, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
ROOM 303 STOCKBRIDGE HALL

Dr. Erin Krupka
Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information
University of Michigan

A Meeting of the Minds: Informal Agreements and Social Norms >>pdf

Friday, October 10, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
ROOM 303 STOCKBRIDGE HALL
Dr. Laura Gee
Assistant Professor of Economics
Tufts University
Friday, October 24, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Dr. Marc Rysman
Professor of Economics
Boston University
Friday, November 14, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Dr. Yair Taylor
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Economics
Duke University

Patent Breadth versus Length: An Examination of the Pharmaceutical Industry >>pdf

Friday, December 5, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Dr. Scott Barrett
Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics
Columbia University

TIPPING VERSUS COOPERATING TO SUPPLY A PUBLIC GOOD >>pdf

Spring 2014
Friday, February 28
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Shanjun Li
Assistant Professor
Dyson School of Management, Cornell University

Better Lucky Than Rich? Welfare Analysis of Automobile License Allocations in Beijing and Shanghai >>pdf

Friday, March 7
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Ujjayant Chakravorty
Professor of Economics
Tufts University

The Long Run Impact of Biofuels on Food Prices >>pdf

Food for Fuel: The Effect of U.S. Energy Policy on Indian Poverty

Friday, April 4
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Jeff Prince
Associate Professor of Economics
Kelly School of Business, Indiana University

Are There Heterogeneous Effects of Electronic Medical Record Adoption on Patient Health Outcomes? >>pdf

Friday, April 18
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Jura Liaukonyte
Assistant Professor
Dyson School of Management, Cornell University

How TV Ads Influence Online Shopping >>pdf