New strategies for hardware-efficient quantum error correction with superconducting circuits and programmable atomic systems

New strategies for hardware-efficient quantum error correction with superconducting circuits and programmable atomic systems
Harry Levine, Amazon Center for Quantum Computing
Harry Levine
Date and time: Thu, Dec 14, 2023 - 11:30am
Refreshments at 11:15am
Location: LGRT 1033
Category: Condensed Matter Seminar
Abstract:

Quantum error correction is an exciting scientific frontier at the interface of many fields including quantum information science, many-body physics, and computer science. The field has developed rapidly in the last several years, with major milestones marking the first glimpses into a future of error-corrected quantum computers. At the same time, these advances have also illuminated the major science and engineering challenges that remain on the road to useful fault-tolerant quantum computers due to large resource overheads and demanding performance and control requirements. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in strategies to ease the demands of error correction with a focus on two leading quantum information platforms: superconducting circuits and cold atoms. First, I will discuss the paradigm of “erasure qubits” which are qubits for which errors can be flagged in real-time and are consequently easier to correct. In this context, I will discuss recent experiments showing how erasure qubits can be realized using a “dual-rail” encoding in superconducting transmons, offering a way to package standard qubit components into better error correction building blocks. Second, I will discuss the recent, rapid progress in neutral atom quantum computers and highlight how the unique capabilities for efficient and flexible control can ease the path towards scalable operation of error-corrected quantum processors.

Bio: Harry Levine is a research scientist at the AWS Center for Quantum Computing, based in Pasadena, CA. He received his Ph.D from Harvard University in 2021 where he contributed to the development of the neutral atom platform for quantum information processing in the group of Mikhail Lukin. Harry was the 2022 recipient of the Deborah Jin Thesis Prize for his Ph.D work. His current research at AWS focuses on hardware-efficient strategies for quantum error correction with superconducting qubits.