FAQ - Clinical Psychology

Answer:
  • Please see our Admissions Statement regarding GRE and GPA scores.
  • Applicants should have majored in psychology. Exceptions will be considered for applicants with other majors who have taken a minimum set of psychology courses including introductory psychology, statistics, research methods, abnormal psychology, and at least three additional advanced courses in psychology. A background in statistics is required. 
  • Applicants must have some research experience in the form of assistantships, honors theses, or collaborative efforts resulting in presentation and publication.  
  • Applicants should have some clinical experience. Appropriate types of experience include volunteer or paid work on an inpatient unit of a psychiatric hospital, a clinic in which psychological services are provided, crisis intervention center, peer counseling, or other similar "help"-oriented activity.
Answer:

Each year, we receive about 225 applications and choose a class of 4 students.

Answer:

We do not offer an online program for graduate training in clinical psychology. You could check with the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C. at 800/374-2721 x 5979 for information.

Answer:

The Clinical Psychology Program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is a clinical science program that operates on a mentor model. Students are admitted expressly to work with specific faculty members and the match between your research interests, your prior research experiences, and the faculty interests is of vital importance. You must complete the Faculty Research Interests Ranking Form which must be completed in order for your application to be considered.

Answer:

Faculty research interests are listed on their profile pages. Our Admissions page is updated in late August to indicate which faculty are accepting students in the coming year.

Answer:

We suggest you find another match, or that you apply another year when the person you select will be interviewing.

Answer:

Yes, interviews for for Fall 2017 admission will be announced as soon as possible.

Answer:

In some cases of extreme hardship or overseas residence, a telephone interview can be conducted.

Answer:

A car is handy, but not necessary. It would be important for you to live close to the PVTA Bus Line, which is free and goes to many areas in and around the Amherst and 5-college communities. You would be limited in the external practica that you could arrange, however, since some of them require a car. Depending on your research interests, a car is sometimes needed for data collection or participant recruitment.

Answer:

The program is strenuous and students are not able to hold a full-time or part-time job while enrolled in the program. Most students receive funding and tuition waivers from teaching or research assistantships.

Answer:

You may take a graduate course through UMass Continuing Education. However, most of the Clinical Psychology graduate courses are available only to those enrolled in the graduate program.

Answer:

Generally, yes. Faculty will call those applicants who rise to the top of their qualified candidates list.

Answer:

If you would like to apply again another year, please re-apply through the UMass Graduate School, and be sure to update your letters of recommendation, your personal statement, and your Faculty Research Interests Ranking Form.

Answer:

We seek intelligent, hardworking students who will make a contribution to clinical science. Although they are not perfect measures, the GRE and GPA are the best measures available for us to determine how bright and motivated an applicant is. Your personal essay and letters of recommendation help us determine whether there is a good fit between your interests and what the program has to offer. Be sure to carefully read the Mission Statement of our program to determine whether the University of Massachusetts Amherst is the type of clinical science program for you. This is not a program for persons who wish to be practitioners. 

Answer:

We are primarily interested in letters of recommendation that can tell us about your academic skills and ability to succeed in a doctoral program. Generally, the most helpful letters come from faculty members who know you well. We strongly recommend that at least two of your letters come from people who can speak about your performance in school. If you are working in a setting that is relevant to the program (e.g., for a psychologist), a letter from your employer may be helpful. However, letters from friends, relatives, etc. should be avoided.

Answer:

Some students enter our program with master's degrees from other universities. Based on a review of their graduate transcripts and other appropriate materials (e.g., course syllabi), we determine which of their graduate credits or credentials can be accepted as transfer credits. The clinical science program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is a 5-year program, even if you enter with a master's degree.

Answer:

No, let us invite you first. Because we receive a large number of applications, our policy is to first evaluate the applications and then invite the most promising applicants to interview in person. Of course, if you have any questions about the program or your application, feel free to email us.

Answer:

The Clinical Psychology program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst requires five years of work in residence and then an additional sixth year in a clinical internship.

Answer:

During your sixth and final year in the program, you will complete a yearlong, predoctoral internship, typically with a research emphasis, at an APA-approved internship site. Acceptance into a predoctoral internship is competitive and you will need to apply in the fall of your fifth year. It is possible that you will have to relocate to another part of the country for your internship. The internship is an electronic match, managed by the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers.

Answer:

No, the UMass Amherst Clinical Program requires a full-time commitment.  Coursework, research, assistantships, and clinical practicum are time intensive and demanding and it is not feasible to make satisfactory progress in the program on a part-time basis.