UManage Center

Year Three Pilot Projects

A Tablet-based Simple Walking Intervention to Improve Self-management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Fatigue

PI: Jeungok Choi, RN, PhD

Co-I: Gabrielle Abelard, DNP, PMHNP-BC

Co-I: Jenna Marquard, PhD

Dr. Choi has had a long-term interest in improving self-management, particularly among older adults with low literacy skills. She also has expertise and experience in patient education using websites and mobile computers, such as tablets. The purpose of this study is to develop a tablet-based cognitive behavioral intervention application that improves self-management of fatigue among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fatigue is highly prevalent among individuals with RA, and has a significant impact on their physical functioning and quality of life.

Studies have shown that interventions based around physical activity or exercise interventions have a moderate to significant effect on fatigue. These exercise interventions, however, are resource-intensive, requiring specially trained personnel, highly structured activities, and attendance at classes or a specified facility. Each of these components increases cost and barriers to implementation, which often leads to high dropout rates. Self-management is a promising strategy to improve patients’ long-term engagement and adherence. This study will develop a tablet-based cognitive behavioral intervention application based around a simple walking-based physical activity with a pedometer. Such activities are easy to learn, require minimal professional guidance and equipment, and yield significant reductions in fatigue.

The project will identify any initial design issues, examine if the intervention can be seamlessly integrated into the daily lives of patients, and test the effect of the intervention on daily steps, fatigue level, self-efficacy, and quality of life with the overall aim of improving participants’ RA fatigue.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20NR016599. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institutes of Health.

Jeungok Choi

Associate Professor

Campus Address: 
Skinner Hall 120
Phone: 
413.545.5689

 


Self-monitoring of Fluid Status to Improve Sleep and Reduce Fatigue in Patients with Lung Congestion Secondary to Circulatory Overload

PI: Beth Henneman, RN, PhD, CCNS, FAAN

Co-I: Trisha Andrew, PhD

Faculty Collaborator: Jenna Marquard, PhD

Beth Henneman, RN, PhD, CCNS, FAAN, is a nurse researcher with a focus on keeping patients safe. The long-term goal of her proposed study is to develop a home-monitoring system for patients at risk of developing fluid overload and lung congestion.

Sleep disturbances and fatigue are common in patients with circulatory overload and lung congestion. These symptoms not only impact the patient’s quality of life but are predictors of poor outcomes. It is therefore important to develop methods of identifying early circulatory overload in at-risk patients, such as those with heart failure, renal failure, and hypervolemia. The ability to identify the occurrence of early hemodynamic changes and lung congestion would allow the patient and clinician to intervene early, possibly avoiding hospitalization.

A noninvasive, hands-free system for the personalized monitoring of hemodynamic status and lung congestion that is easy to use by patients and family members in the home setting is needed. The broader goal is to create an early warning system that is feasible to design, manufacture, and test. Part of this is the development of wearable fabrics that allow for the measurement of variables related to fluid overload. The aim of this pilot is to define the end-user requirements for these wearable fabrics. The study will determine if a wearable device will be adopted and used by patients and providers. By putting human factors at the forefront, the intention is to avoid designing a system that patients and providers will not adopt or use.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20NR016599. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institutes of Health.