Timme-Laragy Named Member of NIH Cancer Etiology Study Section

Alicia Timme-Laragy
Alicia Timme-Laragy

Alicia Timme-Laragy, associate professor of environmental health sciences, has been selected to serve as a member of the Cancer Etiology Study Section for the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The Cancer Etiology Study Section reviews grant applications related to the causal agents, processes, and cells involved in early events in carcinogenesis. Focus areas include the role of DNA damage, DNA replication stress and DNA repair defects in carcinogenesis. Focus areas include the role of DNA damage, DNA replication stress and DNA repair defects in carcinogenesis.

"I am honored to be selected to become a standing member and to contribute to the NIH's peer-review process," says Timme-Laragy. "By reviewing others grants, and by observing how other panel members perceive them, I hope to be able to calibrate my own perspective of what makes a grant go from 'good' to 'outstanding' and translate that into my own grantsmanship and mentoring."

The Cancer Etiology Study Section is part of the NIH's larger Oncology Basic Translational Integrated Review Group (OBT IRG), which considers applications involving basic and translational investigations that encompass cancer initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. Specifically, the OBT IRG reviews research grant applications related to chemical and environmental induced carcinogenesis, cancer genetics, tumor biology, oncogenic transformation, regulation of tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, mechanisms of interactions between tumor and host system, and pathological approaches to oncogenesis.