The Sustainable Energy-Access Network for Africa Engages Stakeholders in Ghana

Nate Whitaker, Erin Baker, and the chief of Nyankpala meet in Tamale, Ghana, to discuss the electricity system from the perspective of consumers in rural villages.
Nate Whitaker, Erin Baker, and the chief of Nyankpala meet in Tamale, Ghana, to discuss the electricity system from the perspective of consumers in rural villages.
SEN-Africa team visits a solar farm in Navrongo, in  the  Upper East Region of Ghana. Destenie Nock PhD 2019 is in the foreground.
SEN-Africa team visits a solar farm in Navrongo, in the upper east region of Ghana. Destenie Nock, a 2019 doctoral graduate, is in the foreground.

Erin Baker, professor of industrial engineering, and Nate Whitaker, professor of mathematics, recently visited colleagues from the University of Ghana and University of Cape Town as part of a World University Network (WUN) grant. The Sustainable Energy-Access Network for Africa, established as part of the WUN grant, is made up of researchers from the University of Massachusetts, also including Leonce Ndikumana, professor of economics, University of Ghana, University of Cape Town, University of Nairobi, Argonne National Lab and Carnegie Mellon University.

The team’s aim is to investigate how to improve electricity systems and access throughout the African continent, using stakeholder-driven methods to inform policy and investment. Workshops were held by the team in Ghana in August to understand stakeholder preferences around electricity access, as well as to assess challenges and barriers.

Professors Baker and Whitaker performed a series of follow-up interviews with a wide range of stakeholders in both southern and northern Ghana. They found a consistent priority on providing electricity access to improve educational opportunity, as well as a focus on how to enable the productive use of electricity.

More information can be found on the Sustainable Energy-Access Network for Africa website.