NE CSC Newsletter

Friday, May 24, 2013

News and upcoming events related to the Northeast Climate Science Center.


------ NE CSC NEWS: -----------------------------------------------------------------

NE CSC Tribal Partner co-hosts 37th Annual National Indian Timber Symposium, “Overcoming Obstacles in Pursuit of Sustainability”     Hosted by the Menominee Indian Tribe and Stockbridge-Munsee Community at the Menominee Casino & Resort in Keshena, WI on June 10 - 13, 2013.  The Intertribal Timber Council coordinates and conducts an Annual National Indian Timber Symposium designed to facilitate communication from the perspective of tribes, the BIA, private industry, legislative bodies, and academia on issues and concerns of current forestry management practices.  Symposium participants produce findings and recommendations, which are submitted to the Assistant Secretary of the Interior and other federal agencies for follow-up. This procedure gives the Intertribal Timber Council and the BIA a foundation to analyze the progress occurring to resolve the issues being confronted. The Menominee Indian Tribe welcomes participants by saying, "We have a profound opportunity to plant the seeds of change for future generations by embodying the ideals of forest preservation and management. As we begin this week of learning, I encourage you all to explore new sources of information, question to find new learning, and lastly share your experience with one another."  It will include a 1 day workshop on climate change adaptation.  Visit NE CSC Consortium Institution, College of Menominee Nation at the exhibitor tables.  Read more and register…

The Climate Science Center Academic Directors and their principal colleagues met last week, May 16 and 17, at the Fish & Wildlife Service office in Arlington, VA.  There was a full agenda of discussions on cross-cutting themes, meetings of working groups, and strategic planning for future directions. Although travel restrictions prevented most USGS partners from participating, staff from the (NCCWSC) joined the meeting to discuss both administrative and strategic topics.  A good time was had by all!

Climate adaptation meetings held in NYC and DC     Radley Horton, an NE CSC Principal Investigator, attended several meetings in recent weeks related to climate change adaptation challenges in the Northeast region.  On April 24 he presented at a Senate Democratic Steering and Outreach Hearing in DC, and on May 8 he attended a Hurricane Sandy Task Force event and met with John Holdren in NYC.  In mid-May, Radley contributed to a State Department briefing on sea level rise in DC.  Read more...

NE CSC works with Vermont researchers to improve climate assessments in Lake Champlain region   NE CSC researchers Jonathan Winter and Radley Horton are working with scientists at the University of Vermont to improve downscaling of general circulation model (GCM) data for climate change impacts assessments in the Lake Champlain Basin as part of the VT Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).  This effort investigates the potential for using high-resolution topographic data to further downscale existing bias-corrected and statistically downscaled GCM simulations of temperature and precipitation.  VT EPSCoR scientists and stakeholders will use the resulting dataset to evaluate projected changes in climate across, as well as drive hydrologic and ecological models for, the Lake Champlain Basin.  Investigators hope that the methods developed will be applicable throughout the NE for climate change assessments and impacts modeling.  Jonathan will help present preliminary findings of this research at the VT EPSCoR Annual State Meeting in Burlington next week.  Read more...

New NE CSC project - paleoclimate data in Northeast lakes    As part of the continuing collaboration between the NE CSC and the UMass Climate System Research Center, PhD student and NE CSC Fellow Greg de Wet will spend the summer working on a project focused on compiling existing paleo-limnological data from lakes throughout the Northeast. Through collaboration with Dr. Deb Willard of the USGS, the goal of this project is to create an editable database of existing chronologies and proxy data. This resource can then be accessed and added to by any paleo-limnologists working in the region. Based on the existing information, researchers will be able to identify "high-reward" lakes that may be targeted for future high-resolution paleoclimate analysis and also pinpoint regions of the Northeast that may be currently lacking sufficient paleo-limnological data. This work will also help place modern extreme weather events in perspective by creating a record of floods, droughts, etc., back in time beyond instrumental and historical records. Read more...

Northeast region Tribes featured on ITEP website    "Climate change affects us all, but tribes have been particularly hard-hit by the impacts of atmospheric warming and the myriad changes it brings. It isn't just Alaska Natives who experience these changes; tribal members living close to the land in the lower 48 states are also seeing dramatic changes in the world around them. From fishing impacts in the Northwest to severe water depletion in the Southwest to heightened storm events along the Gulf Coast and Eastern seaboard, tribal communities see the impacts every day, and they've long since moved past the mindset of regarding climate change as a 'theory.'"  The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals presents profiles by region of various tribes and organizations that deal with, and attempt to respond to, climate change and its impacts.  Read more about Tribes in the Northeast US:  
» Passamaquoddy Tribe
» Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe
» Tuscarora Nation



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National Center for Atmospheric Research Releases Online Climate Data Guide     The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) recently launched a tool for searching and evaluating climate data sets.  NCAR's tool, the Climate Data Guide, is a web-based source for scientifically sound information and advice on the strengths, limitations, and applications of climate data.  Experts who construct, evaluate, and compare climate data sets contribute their perspectives and advice on climate data and analysis methods for a broad community of data users. Users may participate by posting comments, questions, and links.  NCAR has designed the tool to act as a living repository for the climate community's collective knowledge and expertise on a broad array of observational datasets and their appropriate use in analyses and model evaluation.  Read more...



------ WEBINARS: -------------------------------------------------------------

Wednesday, May 29, 1:00 PM ET
Forest Service Region 5 Climate Change Integration Team presents,
"The Climate Project Screening Tool"
Dr. Toni Lyn Morelli, from the Northeast Climate Science Center and U.C. Berkeley, will be presenting the Climate Project Screening Tool (CPST), developed with her collaborators when she was a Research Ecologist at the USFS Pacific Southwest Research Station. Her presentation will explain how to use this tool to integrate climate change considerations into project planning as well as to develop concrete adaptation options for land managers. The CPST also serves as a priority-setting tool, allowing managers to consider effects of different actions. Finally, it helps to reduce uncertainty by identifying the range of impacts that both climatic changes and management actions may have on resources.

To register, visit:  http://necsc.umass.edu/webinars/climate-project-screening-tool

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Thursday, May 30, 2:30 PM ET
NCCWSC Climate Change Science and Management webinar series presents,
"Impacts of Climate Change and Melting Glaciers on Coastal Ecosystems in the Nearshore Waters of the Gulf of Alaska"
John Crusius, USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program
To register, visit:  https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/webinar/186

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Tuesday, June 4, 2013 from 12-1pm ET
The Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies presents,
"Inspiring Wildlife Viewers to Conservation Action "
To join, visit: http://www.fishwildlife.org/index.php?section=events&evtid=779
Call information: 1-888-670-3525 with passcode 8353694269#

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Webinar Series: Climate Change Adaptation for States, Tribes and Local Governments     North Carolina State University, in cooperation with EPA's Office of Strategic Environmental Management will host a virtual Symposium on climate change adaptation for states, tribes and local governments offered in a series of twelve on-line sessions over two weeks. The series will bring together tribal, state and local stakeholders, EPA representatives, and experts from a variety of sectors to consider the impact of EPA's new Climate Change Adaptation Plan on the implementation of federal environmental programs, and to present case studies, tools and solutions to some of the most pressing climate change adaptation challenges.

Monday, June 3
Building Adaptive Capacity for Climate Change     
Planning for Sea Level Rise     
Water, Communities & Planning

Tuesday, June 4     
Adapting to Air Quality and Health Impacts of Climate Change           
Achieving Resiliency to Drought     
Tribal Climate Adaptation

Monday, June 10           
Incorporating Emergency Preparedness and Hazard Mitigation into Adaptation Plans           
Risk Management and Insurance Strategies related to Climate Change

Tuesday, June 11     
Equity and Adaptation for Vulnerable Communities           
Climate Adaptation Decision Support Tools     
Successful Response to Coastal Adaptation Challenges

Wednesday, June 12                       
Climate Adaptation: the Way Forward

Read more and register for these webinars:  www.climate-adaptation-symposium.org/

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Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) hosts a Tribal Climate Change Webinar Series in June and July that will provide basic information about climate change, its impacts on tribes in the United States, and outreach and education material and resources that tribes can use with their communities to increase their awareness and understanding of climate change.

Thursday, June 13, 2013—10:00-11:15 am Pacific
Webinar 1: Climate Change-What it is and why it's important
Zack Guido, Associate Staff Scientist, Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS), University of Arizona

Tuesday, June 18, 2013—10:00-11:15 am Pacific
Webinar 2: Indicators of Climate Change
Lesley Jantarasami and Mike Kolian, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Change Division

Tuesday, June 25, 2013 11:00-12:15 pm Pacific
Webinar 3: Climate Change Impacts on Tribes
Bull Bennett, President, Kiksapa Consulting; Nancy Maynard, Emeritus Scientist, NASA; Patricia Cochran, Executive Director, Alaska Native Science Commission; Kathy Lynn, Project Coordinator, PNW Tribal Climate Change Project, University of Oregon; and Sue Wotkyns, Climate Change Program Manager, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Northern Arizona University

Read more and register for these webinars:  http://www4.nau.edu/itep/climatechange/tcc_webinars.asp

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Tuesday, June 18, 2013, 1:00 PM ET
USFS Landscape Science Webinar series presents,
"ForWarn: A Cross-cutting Forest Resource Management & Decision-support System."
Bill Hargrove - Research Ecologist, Forest Service Southern Research Station
To register, visit: http://www.fs.fed.us/research/docs/landscape-science/webinar-series.pdf

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Thursday, June 20, 1 pm CT
U.S. Drought Portal presents,
"Midwest and Great Plains Drought and Climate Outlook"
To register, visit: http://drought.gov/drought/content/regional-programs/regional-drought-we...

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Thursday June 06 at 2:00 PM ET
OneNOAA Science Seminars
"Ecological Forces Shaping Coastal Marine Ecosystems: The Intermittent Upwelling Hypothesis and a Test"
Dr. Bruce Menge
To register, visit: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/seminars/2013/06-jun.html#OneNOAAScienceSeminar...

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Tuesday June 11 at 3:00 PM ET
NCCWSC Climate Science and Management webinar series
"Mammals Take On The Rapture Hypothesis, Jacob's Ladder, And Other Notions Of Doom, Gloom, And Predictable Uniform Change In High Elevation Ecosystems In The Sierra Nevada Range Part 1"
Robert Klinger
To register, visit: https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/webinar/185



------ UPCOMING EVENTS: --------------------------------------------------------------

ScienceOnline Climate Conference, Aug 15-17, Washington D.C.     This two-day event is not your traditional climate science meeting. With an un-conference format that is driven by participants and emphasizes conversation, ScienceOnline Climate will explore the intersection of climate science, communication, and the web. Complex scientific concepts will be interwoven with creative communications approaches through the connective power of the internet. It will be an energizing experience for scientists, journalists, artists, policymakers, and attendees from all nodes of the climate communications ecosystem.  Read more…

EPA and Partners to Host Free Workshop on Stormwater Responses to Changes in Land Use and Precipitation-Driven Flooding in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed on June 20, 2013    York County, Pennsylvania and EPA's Global Change Impacts and Adaptation Program, in partnership with the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program Office, the Chesapeake Bay Local Government Advisory Committee, and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's National Climate Assessment, are hosting a workshop to assist local municipalities and planners in exploring the impacts of projected changes in land use and precipitation-driven flooding on stormwater runoff in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and potential management responses.  An all-day workshop has been scheduled for June 20, 2013 which will cover projected changes in local land use and precipitation-driven flooding and allow attendees to participate in mapping exercises and facilitated discussions about stormwater management options.  The Workshop will bring together representatives from the Chesapeake Bay region with expertise and/or local knowledge in water quality and stormwater management.  The workshop is free; however, registration is required by May 31, 2013.  For more information and to register, contact Pam Shellenberger at: pshellenberger@ycpc.org.

Tribal Science Council's Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Workshop   June 18-20, Syracuse, NY. Sponsored by the National EPA-Tribal Science Council (TSC) and co-hosted by the Onondaga Nation and the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry. The workshop will center around the theme of Cultural Survival.  Read more...

Two upcoming webcourses on using social indicators in nonpoint source water programming - June and July, 2013.     Funded by the Great Lakes Regional Water Program, the courses introduce participants to a comprehensive framework for working with landowners and managers to implement effective water quality programs. Courses focus on the social context of water programming and the awareness, attitudes, capacities, constraints and behaviors of stakeholders. Using social indicators can help resource managers and conservation professionals understand target audiences, select effective interventions and evaluate their impacts. Courses will feature live interactive webinars, recorded presentations and hands-on assignments. Pre-registration is required.  Read more...



------ OTHER NEWS: --------------------------------------------------------------

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Surpass 400 ppm    According to separate analyses from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the 24-hour average atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration surpassed 400 parts per million (ppm) on May 9 at the Mauna Loa sampling in Hawaii. The last time atmospheric concentrations were above 400 ppm was likely more than three million years ago. Dr. Ralph Keeling, director of the CO2 monitoring program at Scripps, said of passing the milestone, “It means we are quickly losing the possibility of keeping the climate below what people thought were possibly tolerable thresholds.”  Read more...

Spring 2012 Earliest on Record     March 2012 set records for warm temperatures that promoted early leafing and flowering across large areas of the United States. A team of scientists at the USA National Phenology Network, which is sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, have published a study which shows that 2012 was the earliest spring over the 48 U.S. states since 1900 when systematic weather data began to be available for the entire area. Read more...

NOAA: Water Temps Highest in 150 Years in Northeast     Sea surface temperatures in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem during 2012 were the highest recorded in 150 years, according to the latest Ecosystem Advisory issued by NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC). These high sea surface temperatures are the latest in a trend of above average temperature seen during the spring and summer seasons, and part of a pattern of elevated temperatures occurring in the Northwest Atlantic, but not seen elsewhere in the ocean basin over the past century.  Read more...

Interior Appoints New Climate Change Advisory Committee     WASHINGTON, D.C. — Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced the members of a newly created federal advisory committee who will provide guidance about the Interior Department’s climate change adaptation science initiatives.  The Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science will advise the Secretary of the Interior about the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and the Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers, which are managed by the U.S. Geological Survey.  Read more…

Tribal representatives appointed to DOI's new Climate Change Advisory Committee    Ann Marie Chischilly, Executive Director of the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP), was appointed to the newly created federal advisory committee that will provide guidance about the Interior Department's climate change adaptation science initiatives. The Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science will advise the Secretary of the Interior about the USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and the Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers, which are managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Gary Morishima, technical advisor to the chairman, Quinault Nation, was also appointed to the 25-member committee. Read more…

An outcome of the tribal sessions of the National Adaptation Forum (NAF) is the formation of National Tribal Climate Change Policy Working Teams. Across the United States, American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and other indigenous communities are making significant strides to understand and address the impacts of climate change on tribal culture, sovereignty and traditional ways of life. Over the past few years, a number of initiatives have brought together tribal leaders, tribal staff, and tribal organizations, as well as non-tribal agencies, researchers, and non-governmental entities to document needs, identify resources and work together on common issues. The initiatives and events have pointed towards a need for increased coordination on policy, funding and programs related to climate change. As a first step in coming together on several key policy issues, there will be a conference call to identify individuals that have an interest in working together on three different working teams to address national-level policy related to: 1) climate adaptation and adaptation funding, 2) mitigation and 3) traditional ecological knowledge.  The presentations and full proceedings of the NAF tribal sessions are available at:  
http://tribalclimate.uoregon.edu/naf-2013/.


The call will take place on June 5, 1 PM Mountain time, with subsequent working team calls later in the summer.  If you would like to participate in an upcoming call to discuss the background and direction of these working teams, please register at:  
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Ah2p3YBl1GbYdHVQdVFHYWN2QU5...

Sequester Hits Nation's Climate Change Research Capability     Eight regional centers dedicated to expanding climate research at the local level lose millions in budget cuts.   When Renee McPherson took on the role of director of research at the South Central Climate Science Center last year, she had no idea that she’d soon be grappling with budget cuts that threatened her ability to support regional climate research or hire new graduate students and faculty—the premise of hosting the center in the first place.  Read more...

Draft National Climate Assessment Comment period ends     The public comment period on the draft National Climate Assessment report closed on Friday, April 12. We received over 4,000 comments by this deadline, including comments from federal agencies and the National Research Council.    Read more...

Cape Wind: Justice Department Urges Swift Lawsuit Resolution Before Tax Breaks Expire    Lawyers from the Department of Justice have urged a federal district court to speed up its review of pending lawsuits against a proposed massive wind energy installation in the center of Nantucket Sound so that the project can take advantage of federal tax credits that are set to expire at the end of the year. Cape Wind, the contested turbine project proposed off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, has warded off a series of lawsuits during the 12-year pre-construction governmental regulatory phase since it was first announced in 2001. Among pending lawsuits is one by the Wampanoag Tribe of Gayhead (Aquinnah). Read more...

Mapping Climate Scenarios for Isle Royale: A GLISA Core Team Project     Isle Royale, an island located in the middle of Lake Superior, is home to a celebrated wolf and moose population. The island environment is a unique system in that its ecosystems and animal life are essentially isolated from the mainland. The island's marine-like weather and climate is influenced by Lake Superior. Because of the island’s unique weather systems and ecosystems, the National Park Service (NPS) approached GLISA Team Members Ricky Rood and Laura Briley to incorporate climate change into the park’s planning and management process. Using GLISAclimate.org to build and store their information table, Briley and Rood tailored climate information to help create different climate scenarios for future park planning and management. Read more…

April 17-18, 2013: Record Rainfall Across Central Midwest     Surface Map Analysis of April 18, 2013.A slow-moving storm system produced abundant rainfall across the central Midwest on April 17th and 18th, resulting in several stream gauges at flood stage and damaging flash flooding across the affected area.  The atmosphere had all of the right ingredients for heavy precipitation in the central Midwest – moisture content, replenishment of moist air via the low-level jet from the Gulf of Mexico, a strong low-pressure system with a stationary front, and high rainfall rates. (From Midwestern Regional Climate Center) Read more…

The Obama Administration released updated Principles and Guidelines (P&G) for federal investments in water resources to accelerate project approvals, reduce costs, and support water infrastructure projects with the greatest economic and community benefits.  The modernized P&G will allow agencies to better consider the full range of long-term economic benefits associated with water investments, including protecting communities against future storm damage, promoting recreational opportunities that support local businesses, and supporting other local priorities as well as their water delivery, navigation, and flood prevention functions.  Climate change provisions are included as well.  The updated P&G will foster consistency and informed decision-making across federal agencies engaged in water resources planning.  The draft Guidelines will be available for public comment until June 27, 2013.  Read more...

Congress eyeing changes to commercial fishing law     As Congress prepares to revisit the law governing how U.S. fishermen ply their trade, New England's beleaguered groundfish industry illustrates the challenge of reviving a historic fishery in the face of climate change and other factors. For some, the industry's struggle to survive is cited as proof that current federal fisheries regulations are too rigid to respond to unique circumstances. For others, the regulations are seen as the type of strong, science-based management that should have been in place decades ago. Read more...

Wings Across the America’s Awards – Habitat Management and Partnership Award to New England forester   In March at the Wings Across the America’s Award Ceremony at the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference, Northeast State/Private Forestry representative, Roger Monthey, joined leader of the Vermont Dept. of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation, to accept the Award for the “Habitat Management and Partnership” for the “Foresters for the Birds” Project.  This private landowner conservation program relied on the scientific body of knowledge on New England forest habitats for birds, produced by Dr. DeGraff and Mariko Yamasaki (publication list), from the Northern Research Station of the Forest Service Research & Development.  Through this program Vermont now has over 1,000,000 acres of forestland, via over 100 landowners, managed to support wildlife conservation. Read more...

Changing Forests in a New Climate: What Might A Forest Manager Do?    NIACS worked with local chapters of the Society of American Foresters and the Ontario Institute of Forestry to organize joint meeting on climate change and forest management.  The event, called "Changing Forests in a New Climate: What can a forest manager do?" was held on April 30 and May 1, 2013, in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan.  Over 100 foresters, land managers, and natural resource professionals from the Great Lakes region attended the event.  Read more...

Can state harvesting guidelines keep biomass sustainable?    As a Midwest biomass group promotes a goal of drawing 10 percent of the region’s heating energy from wood fuels by 2025, more questions are sure to arise about whether that amount of fuel could be harvested sustainably.  Read more...

Warming Waters Are Changing Global Fish Catches     BOSTON — A sweeping new study concludes that climate change is putting global fish stocks on the move.  Published in the journal Nature recently, the study shows that for 40 years now, warming waters have been driving global fish stocks toward cooler, deeper waters. That includes Northeast groundfish, such as cod and flounder.  Nature study or  Read more...

With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear     By the end of the century, the birthplace of America may be underwater.  The first successful English colony in America was at Jamestown, Va., a swampy island in the Chesapeake Bay. The colony endured for almost a century, and remnants of the place still exist. You can go there and see the ruins. You can walk where Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas walked. But Jamestown is now threatened by rising sea levels that scientists say could submerge the island by century's end.  Read more...

For Insurers, No Doubts on Climate Change      If there were one American industry that would be particularly worried about climate change it would have to be insurance, right?  From Hurricane Sandy’s devastating blow to the Northeast to the protracted drought that hit the Midwest Corn Belt, natural catastrophes across the United States pounded insurers last year, generating $35 billion in privately insured property losses, $11 billion more than the average over the last decade. Read more...

New documentary explains how ice continues to shape Great Lakes region     The Great Lakes formed thousands of years ago  when a glacier moved across the region and melted. The film "Project:Ice" depicts the important role ice continues to play in the Great Lakes Basin. Read more...

Study: Rising Lake Superior temperatures affecting fish species   DULUTH, Minn. — A new study shows that climate change could mean better conditions for some Lake Superior fish species, but worse for others.  Surface water temperatures on Lake Superior increased by about 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit between 1979 and 2006. That's one of the fastest rates of any lake on earth. The study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin shows that warming has created more suitable habitat in the lake for some fish, like Chinook salmon, walleye, and lean lake trout, but less favorable conditions for siscowet lake trout, a fatty fish that thrives in cold water. Read more...

Climate change expected to impact Maine's forests     Unless people dramatically cut the amount of carbon dioxide they’re putting into the air and water through industry, farming, landfills and fossil fuel consumption, Maine’s largest manufacturing industry will be damaged in ways scientists can only begin to predict. That’s the conclusion reached by experts who are studying how climate change is likely to affect Maine’s more than 18 million acres of forest.  Read more...



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EBM Tools Network Releases Free Guide to Coastal Climate Planning Tools      The potential impacts of climate change are already influencing the choices that coastal communities, resource managers, and conservation practitioners are making for ecosystems and infrastructure.  To help planners and managers prepare for the far-reaching effects of these changes, the EBM Tools Network has released a free publication, "Tools for Coastal Climate Adaptation Planning: A guide for selecting tools to assist with ecosystem-based climate planning." The guide is designed to assist practitioners responsible for understanding and preparing for climate-related effects.  Read more...

Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health (MATCH) (US Global Change Research Program)   MATCH is a publicly accessible, online tool for researchers that offers centralized access to metadata - standardized contextual information - about thousands of government-held datasets related to health, the environment, and climate-science.  Read more...

USGS BISON Tool    Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON) is a web-based federal resource for finding species in the US and territories.  It offers more than 100 million mapped records of living species nationwide.  And the vast majority of the records are specific locations, not just county or state records. provides an "Area of Interest" search capability in which users can query by drawing the exact boundary around their area of interest, down to and including towns, villages, or even much smaller areas such as parks. For instance, New York City's Central Park has more than 100,000 "species occurrences" recorded in BISON, with each species noted in detail. Other BISON search options include querying the species by scientific or common name, year range, state, county, basis of record, or provider institution.  Read the press release or visit BISON...

New report and video presentation: Climate change vulnerabilities for the Midwest forestry sector   NIACS staff authored a newly released report that summarizes major climate change impacts and vulnerabilities for the forestry sector in the Midwest. This report is part of a series that examines climate change impacts on a range of sectors in the Midwest and was developed as input to the National Climate Assessment. Read more...

Redesigned Climate.gov puts power of climate data & information in users' hands     Upgrades include expanded content and simplifying access to new data tools, imagery, educational resources and more.  NOAA unveiled a new and improved version of Climate.gov, a one-stop web resource for information about our changing climate from NOAA and agencies across the federal government.  NOAA's redesigned Climate.gov website offers user-friendly maps, video, imagery, news, and other features available to anyone seeking timely and trusted information, such as community planners, business and policy leaders, scientists, resource managers, broadcast meteorologists, journalists, and educators.  Read more…

Conservation Corridor - Connecting science to conservation     A new tool developed by the Southeast CSC!  Landscape corridors are among the most important conservation strategies in the face of global changes such as habitat fragmentation, habitat destruction, and climate change. We aim to bridge the science and practice of conservation corridors. Conservation Corridor will provide up-to-date findings from science that will inform applied conservation. And, we will highlight new innovations in applied conservation, with the goal of guiding the direction of applied science toward management needs.  Read more…



------ OPPORTUNITIES: --------------------------------------------------------------

2013 Climate Assessment Grants Competition     This year, the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center (GLISA) will award 3 to 4 one-year grants of up to $50,000 each to organizations that will work with GLISA to address the risks of climate change and variability in the Great Lakes basin.  We seek organizations that can bring together stakeholders from specific sectors or communities to identify and promote understanding of the vulnerabilities, anticipated impacts, and potential for adaptation to climate change and variability. GLISA will support these activities by identifying and providing relevant information about the historical climate, projected futures, and adaptation to potential impacts. Read more...

USDA 2014 National Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program     The USDA National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council seeks grant proposals to address the following priority issues: 1) Making Urban Trees and Forests More Resilient to the Impacts of Natural Disasters and the long-term Impacts of Climate Change; 2) Green Infrastructure Jobs Analysis; 3) Utilizing Green Infrastructure to Manage and Mitigate Stormwater to Improve Water Quality. Potential grantees should work collaboratively with other organizations and entities not traditionally involved in urban and community forestry. Application Due: July 15, 2013. Read more…

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative-Partners for Fish and Wildlife 2013 Grant (USFWS)   The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) Program anticipates funding wetland and associated upland habitat restoration and enhancement projects for conservation of native Great Lakes fish and wildlife populations, particularly migratory birds. Restoration projects will be completed on privately owned (non-federal/non-state) lands. Eligibility includes Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized) and Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments). Deadline: 9/30/13.  Read more...

Coastal Program - Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant (USFWS)     The Coastal Program is a voluntary, incentive-based program that provides technical and financial assistance to coastal communities and landowners to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat on public and private lands. The Coastal Program Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding is available to coastal areas within the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin which includes parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. Eligibility includes Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized). Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments). Deadline: 9/30/13.  Read more…

EPA Science for Sustainable and Healthy Tribes     EPA, as part of its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program, is seeking applications proposing research to develop sustainable solutions to environmental problems that affect tribes. The objectives of the awards to be made under this solicitation are to improve understanding of: 1) the health impacts of climate change on tribal populations; and 2) the health impacts of indoor air pollution exposures that derive from or are directly affecting traditional tribal life-ways and cultural practices. In both cases, projects should focus on impacts to vulnerable sub-populations of the Tribal communities. Proposals should also consider sustainable, culturally appropriate and acceptable pollution prevention, and adaptation/mitigation strategies. Application Due: June 25, 2013. Read more...