NE CSC Newsletter

Monday, July 29, 2013

News and upcoming events related to the Northeast Climate Science Center.

------ NE CSC NEWS: -----------------------------------------------------------------

 

Climate Risk Information released for post-Sandy decisions    NE CSC consortium-member Columbia University released Climate Risk Information (CRI) 2013, in support of New York City Mayor Bloomberg’s Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR), 2013.  The climate analysis and projections presented in CRI are one of the criteria being used to inform multi-billion dollar post-Sandy decisions in New York City.  The sea level rise projections methods in CRI are being used to inform DOI sea level rise and coastal vulnerability projects as well.  Read more...

 

Meeting:  Understanding Climate Impacts on Fish Stocks of the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem:  Key research needs and future directions    Michelle Staudinger, Science Coordinator for the NE CSC attended a successful fisheries science meeting in Providence, RI on July 23.  The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the climate, oceanography and fisheries science community to share knowledge and identify priority science needs and opportunities to advance understanding of the impacts of climate variability and change on fish stocks of the U.S. Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem.  Meeting notes are forthcoming.  Read more…

 

College of Menominee Nation hosts Forest and Climate Leaders Research Retreat     From blog by Cherie Thunder, CMN intern:  "With Memories of capture the flag, jumping from the high dive, and midnight Sun Drop raids, how can we forget the time spent at UW-Madison’s Kemp Research Center? High school students, community members, scientists, undergraduate and graduate students all gathered for the Forest and Climate Leaders Research Retreat in Woodruff, WI from June 21st to June 24th. The four day event was a great way to explore different careers in the STEM fields and to mutually learn from each other. Students and scientist alike were given the chance to exchange ideas and explore other cultures."  Read more…

 

NE CSC Graduate Fellow Graduates    Richard Stanton was partially funded by the NECSC to complete his M.S. research and prepare two publications titled “Patch Occupancy By Brown-Headed Nuthatch Along A Range Extension Front Is Not Predicted Solely By Patch Quality”  and “Cost-Sensitive Resource Selection In A Cooperatively-Breeding Resident Bird.”  Richard is working with Dylan Kesler (University of Missouri)and Frank Thompson (USDA Forest Service) to study Brown-headed nuthatches because this resident bird is a species of conservation concern and has limited dispersal abilities, but has the potential to expand its range northward in response to habitat restoration efforts and climate warming and could be a candidate for assisted migration.  Richard graduated in May 2013 (M.S) and begins a PhD program at University of Florida in August. 

 

New publication:  Landscape-based population viability models demonstrate importance of strategic conservation planning for birds     NE CSC Graduate Fellow Tom Bonnot and co-authors published a recent paper in Biological Conservation.  The authors use landscape-based population viability models to demonstrate the potential for large-scale conservation to restore and sustain regional bird populations.  According to the abstract, "These models offer a valuable advance in conservation planning because they allow an understanding of the effects of local actions on regional growth, which is necessary for translating regional goals into local actions."  Read more...

 

Project completed:  Environmental effects of agricultural practices    Funded by the NE CSC in 2012, the first stakeholder-directed research project is completed.  Researchers with U.S. Geological Survey Water Science Centers in Iowa, Kansas and Massachusetts collaborated to conduct a comprehensive literature search of both published and ongoing research (2000-present) that sheds light on the interactions between climate change, agriculture and water quality across the combined geographies of the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC and neighboring Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC. Project investigators compiled the information in a resource library by geographic location, providing an organized structure for future examination of all research related to interactions between climate change, agriculture and water quality in these two regions.  Through cooperation with the Center for Integrated Data Analytics (CIDA), a searchable format geared toward the general end-user may be generated.  Read more...

 

 

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Visit NE CSC researchers at Upcoming ESA meeting!    If you are attending the Ecological Society of America's Annual Meeting in Minneapolis this year, August 4-9, be sure to check out some of the sessions and talks that will feature researchers from the NE CSC and other Climate Science Centers!  A few are listed here.  Read more...

 

Monday, August 5, 2013

10:15 AM - 11:30 AM; 101A, Minneapolis Convention Center

Special Session #1 (SS 1):  Climate Science Centers: Now Supporting Resource Management With Science at a Location Near You!  

 

 

Wednesday, August 7

8-11:30 AM; 101B, Minneapolis Convention Center

OOS 16:  Informing and Evaluating Climate Change Adaptation Approaches Using Historic Ecological Data Records    (NE CSC UMN PI Anthony D’Amato is co-organizer)

 

OOS 16-1:  Long-term silviculture experiments impact stand-level weather sensitivity, resistance, and resilience - David A. McKenzie, University of Minnesota; Anthony W. D'Amato, University of Minnesota; Brian J. Palik, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station; Shawn Fraver, USDA Forest Service; John B. Bradford, US Geological Survey; John C. Brissette, Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service

 

OOS 16-2:  Characterizing the differential sensitivity of tree species and forest types to past weather variability using dendrochronological techniques - Jane R. Foster, University of Minnesota; Anthony W. D'Amato, University of Minnesota; John B. Bradford, US Geological Survey

 

 

Thursday, August 8, 2013

2:10 PM; 101F, Minneapolis Convention Center

OOS 30-3:  Coupling LINKAGES and LANDIS Pro to predict future tree species distributions in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions.  - Frank R. Thompson III, University of Missouri-Columbia; Hong S. He, University of Missouri; William D. Dijak, University of Missouri-Columbia; Brice B. Haneberry, University of Missouri; Jacob S. Fraser, University of Missouri; Wen J. Wang, University of Missouri

 

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

10:50 AM; L100J, Minneapolis Convention Center

COS 30-9:  Comparing predictions of forest aboveground biomass of LINKAGES v2.2, PnET-II, and ED2 with long-term field data in temperate forests of the United States  - Wenchi Jin , School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Hong S. He , School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO ; Frank R. Thompson III , USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; Stephen R. Shifley , USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

 

 

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ClimateChangeLIVE     The U.S. Forest Service’s Conservation Education program, Prince William Network and partners are bringing climate learning to students and educators through a series of webcasts, webinars, and an interactive website with online climate education re- sources. This distance learning adventure provides an unprecedented collection of science-based climate education resources and programs through 20 agency and NGO partners. This amazing collection of science-based, climate education resources and programs are aligned to national science education standards and are available online now. The ClimateChangeLIVE electronic field trips are a way to learn about climate change science directly from climate experts and educators and to have the chance to interact with them during the ClimateChangeLIVE webcasts and on social media.  Visit ClimateChangeLIVE...

 

 

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Tuesday, July 30 at 3:30 PM EST 

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center presents, 

“Relationships among Climate, Water Quality and Toxic Blooms of Golden Alga in Texas”

Reynaldo Patino, USGS Texas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

To register, visit: https://nccwsc.usgs.gov/webinar/188

 

 

Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 11:00am - 12:00pm PT

Carpe Diem West Academy presents, 

Vulnerability Assessment, Take Three - Stories from the Field

Keely Brooks - Climate Change Policy Analyst, Southern Nevada Water Authority

Nicole Woodman - Sustainability Manager, City of Flagstaff 

Kiyomi Morino - Senior Researcher, University of Arizona

Moderated by Dr. Holly Hartmann -  Director of the Arid Lands Information Center, University of Arizona/CLIMAS 

To join, visit: http://carpediemwestacademy.org/webinar

 

Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 12:00 p.m. PDT

Joint Fire Science Program, International Association of Wildland Fire, and Wildland Fire Lessons Learned Center present,

"Can Our Forests Take the Heat? Fire, Climate Change and Tree Mortality in the Western U.S."

Phil van Mantgem, USGS Western Ecological Research Center 

To join, visit: http://wildfirelessons.net/AFP.aspx?Page=AFPOverview

 

Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 1:00-2:30 PM Eastern

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation present, 

State Wildlife Action Plans: lessons learned in adapting for an era of climate change

Naomi Edelson, NWF; Austin Kane, NWF; Chris Hilke, NWF; Patty Glick, NWF; Lynn Helbrecht, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Chris Burkett, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; Joe Racette, New York Department of Environmental Conservation

To join, visit: http://www.cakex.org/community/events/webinar-state-wildlife-action-plans-lessons-learned-adapting-era-climate-change

 

Wednesday, August 14, 2013, 11:00-11:45am ET

Waste Wise, Connect4Climate and the Earth Engineering Center present, 

Solid Waste Management and Climate Change: Waste Wise Panel

Prof. Paul H. Brunner, Vienna University of Technology; Prof. Morton Barlaz, North Carolina State University; Perinaz Bhada-Tata, Columbia University.

This panel will be broadcast live at: http://wastewise.be/ai1ec_event/solid-waste-management-and-climate-change/

 

 

 

 

------ UPCOMING EVENTS: ---------------------------------------------------

 

ITEP offers training to tribal environmental professionals to build their capacity to address climate change issues.The courses are taught by instructional teams that include staff from ITEP, federal agencies, universities, and/or organizations, and most importantly, the tribes themselves, who share their expertise and experience.  Climate Change Adaptation Planning courses are offered around the country this summer and fall.  Read more…

 

Forum: Climate Strategies Forum    October 14-17, Washington, DC. The Association of Climate Change Officers proudly launches its inaugural Climate Strategies Forum in conjunction with the recent publication of Core Competencies for Climate Change Officers. The Forum will feature prominent leaders from across sectors in a plenary format, and a series of half-day bootcamps aligned with the core competencies. Plenary sessions will focus on climate and energy, and bootcamps will focus on topics including adaptation planning, implementing change management schemes, implementing a GHG management structure, and building a public-private partnership project.  Read more...

           

Training: Climate-Smart Conservation    October 29-31, Shepherdstown, WV. Offered by the National Conservation Training Center. This course is based on a forthcoming guide to the principles and practice of Climate-Smart Conservation. This publication is the product of an expert workgroup on climate change adaptation convened by the National Wildlife Federation in collaboration with the FWS's National Conservation Training Center and other partners. The course is designed to demystify climate adaptation for application to on-the-ground conservation. It will provide guidance in how to carry out adaptation with intentionality, how to manage for change and not just persistence, how to craft climate-informed conservation goals, and how to integrate adaptation into on-going work. Conservation practitioners and natural resource managers will learn to become savvy consumers of climate information, tools, and models.  Read more...

 

Accepting Abstracts: Fall Meeting, American Geophysical Union, Dec 9 – 13, 2013, San Francisco, CA Researchers and collaborators from the DOI/USGS Climate Science Centers are sponsoring two sessions at the Fall AGU meeting entitled, “Climate Variability and Water Resources Management: Integrating Paleoclimate, Observations and Physical Models” (session # GC011) and “Glacier Change: Implications for Hydrology, Biogeochemistry, Ecology and Oceanography” (session # GC018).Deadline: August 6, 2013.  Submit an abstract…

 

Second Ocean Acidification Principal Investigators' Meeting Scheduled for September 18-20, 2013 in Washington, D.C.  This three-day meeting will be held at Gallaudet University's Kellogg Conference Center and will bring together the U.S. ocean acidification research community to assess the state of OA science nationally and to identify knowledge gaps and opportunities for collaborations that will accelerate OA research in the future.  Read more…

 

 

 

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The Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers (LCC) released its newly designed public web site to promote effective conservation through collaboration and sound science. The LCC facilitates dialogue among federal, state, non-governmental, academic and private interests to build a collaborative network of knowledge surrounding natural resources challenges across a heavily agricultural landscape that stretches across our nation’s heartland from southwest Ohio to parts of eastern Kansas, Oklahoma and Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota and Minnesota.   View new web site…

 

Service Report: Nation’s Rivers Flow toward Better Habitat, Economies and Public Safety (Appalachian LCC)   “Free-flowing, healthy rivers and streams are vital to our nation. Many species of fish, wildlife and plants depend on the natural ebb and flow of rivers at critical stages of their lives,” said Service Director Dan Ashe.  “I’m pleased to report last year the Service and its partners reconnected more than 2,500 miles of streams and 36,000 associated wetland acres, providing opportunities for aquatic populations to increase and become more resilient in the face of greater environmental pressures.”  Read more…

 

Making Science Available for Natural Resource Professionals (Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks LCC)     To sustain the benefits of our forests and grasslands, the way in which we approach land management itself must adapt to changing climate trends and weather events. With an ever increasing wealth of climate science, where do you begin? How do you know if the information you receive is credible? Read more…

 

Natural Barriers Protect Coasts (North Atlantic LCC)     Scientists with the Natural Capital Project at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment show that natural habitats such as dunes and reefs are critical to protecting millions of U.S. residents and billions of dollars in property from coastal storms. Read more…

 

Forest Service Awards $44.2M to Conserve At-Risk Forests (Appalachian LCC)    “Since 1990, the Forest Legacy Program has prevented the loss of more than 2.3 million acres of private forest lands for future generations of Americans,” said Tidwell. “In an era of continued sprawl, this program protects land and keeps working forests working.”  Private forest landowners are facing increasing real estate prices, property taxes and development pressure, resulting in conversion of forests to other land uses. This program protects working forests, thereby supporting rural jobs and economies.  Read more…

 

USDA, Interior and Defense departments partner to benefit agricultural lands, wildlife habitat and military readiness (Appalachian LCC)     Through the Sentinel Landscapes partnership, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Department of the Interior (Interior) and Department of Defense (DoD) will work together in overlapping priority areas near military installations to help farmers and ranchers make improvements to the land that benefit their operation, enhance wildlife habitat, and enable DoD’s training missions to continue.  Read more…

 

Upper Midwest and Great Lakes to benefit from nearly $1 million investment in stakeholder-driven research (Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC)      The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) is investing $957,024 in funding this year to support four ongoing and five new stake-holder driven research projects targeting broad-scale natural resources issues across the upper Midwest and Great Lakes landscape. Read more…

 

Evaluation of a restoration technique: Relocation of Eastern box turtles to reclaimed mineland at the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge (Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC)     Eastern box turtles are a long-lived species that can take up to 10 years to reach sexual maturity. Their life history and threats to their populations have led to a 50% decline in estimated population size over 13 years in Indiana with even more dramatic losses elsewhere. Translocation of turtles may counter losses due to habitat fragmentation by roads or other human disturbance. Read more…

 

Assessing landowner attitudes toward and motivations for participating in conservation programs beneficial to wildlife (Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers LCC)     Researchers at the University of Minnesota seek to better understand the motivations of landowners, specifically farmers, that drive participation in programs that improve wildlife habitat and water quality in working agricultural landscapes.  The LCC is working with U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate factors influencing landowners’ enrollment in U.S. Department of Agriculture programs that improve water quality by reducing sedimentation and nutrient loading by utilizing best management practices that also support wildlife habitat and productive agriculture. Read more...

 

Road block: Fixing connections between the Great Lakes and its tributaries doesn’t end with dams (Upper Midwest and Great Lakes LCC)     Research shows of more than 260,000 road crossings in the Great Lakes drainage basin, 64 percent may block fish movement.  Read more…

 

 

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USGS releases Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery    "Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy" was developed immediately following Hurricane Sandy to coordinate continuing USGS activities with other agencies and to guide continued data collection and analysis to ensure support for recovery and restoration efforts. The data, information, and tools that are produced by implementing this plan will: (1) further characterize impacts and changes, (2) guide mitigation and restoration of impacted communities and ecosystems, (3) inform a redevelopment strategy aimed at developing resilient coastal communities and ecosystems, (4) improve preparedness and responsiveness to the next hurricane or similar coastal disaster, and (5) enable improved hazard assessment, response, and recovery for future storms along the hurricane prone shoreline of the United States.  Read more...

 

President Obama's Climate Action Plan     On June 25, President Barack Obama announced his Climate Action Plan that will  “[keep] the United States of America a leader, a global leader in the fight against climate change.” President Obama has announced a series of executive actions to reduce carbon pollution, prepare the U.S. for the impacts of climate change, and lead international efforts to address global climate change.  See President Obama's Climate Action Plan…

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Boosts State Endangered Species Conservation Efforts with $32 Million in Grants     Issued through the Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund (authorized by Section 6 of the Endangered Species Act), these competitive grants enable states to work with private landowners, conservation groups and other government agencies to initiate conservation planning efforts and acquire and protect habitat that benefits threatened and endangered fish, wildlife and plants.  Read more…

 

USDA and DOI Highlight Successes of Protecting Bird Habitat on Private Lands    "Sixty percent of U.S. land is in private hands, making the efforts of farmers, ranchers and landowners critical when it comes to creating, restoring and protecting bird habitat," Secretary Vilsack said. "Today's report highlights the positive impact of voluntary conservation measures for birds, including those made possible by Farm Bill programs. The need for a long-term commitment to conservation is just one more good reason why we need Congressional passage of a multi-year Food, Farm and Jobs Bill as soon as possible."  Read more…

 

2014 Climate Leadership Awards: Application period open     Award applications are being accepted until September 13 for EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership "Climate Leadership Awards". The awards recognize and incentivize exemplary corporate, organizational, and individual leadership in response to climate change. Read more...

 

Climate Solutions University, Forest and Water Strategies: 2014 Program     Preparing your community for climate adaptation is critical. Smart planning protects citizens from floods and drought, conserves water resources, preserves watershed health, stabilizes micro-climates, maintains species habitat, preserves the economy, and ensures community climate resilience.  Climate Solutions University, Forest & Water Strategies helps you prepare your community. It is a two-step program: 1. Plan Development & 2. Plan Implementation, where you create and implement a climate adaptation plan for your community. Read more…

 

Alaska CSC Joins Partners to Support Tribal Projects    The Alaska Climate Science Center (AK CSC) working in partnership with the Northwest Climate Science Center and the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, jointly selected three innovative tribal projects on climate change adaptation for subsistence and cultural resources.  Read more…

 

USDA Forest Service Tribes and Climate Change Project    In 2010, Forest Service R&D began a nationwide project to better understand the impacts of climate change and the management options available to Tribes and native groups related to this disturbance. Forest Service research stations and field labs have created regional science-manager networks and portfolio studies on specific Tribal and Native groups and their climate change-related needs.  Read more...

 

Public Health and Climate Communication Resources at Climate Access   From allergies and asthmas to heat stroke and vector-borne diseases, the public health impacts of climate change are n increasing concern. The resources in this Climate Access collection provide background information and recommendations for communicating a public health message within a climate context.  Read more…

 

Quarterly climate outlook for NOAA's Eastern Region    With an average spring temperature of 50.5°F, the continental United States was 0.5°F below the 20th century average, making this spring the coolest spring since 1996. The contiguous United States received 7.92 inches of precipitation during spring, 0.21 inches above the 20th century average. The below-average temperatures and above-average precipitation helped contribute to a spring snow cover extent that was the eighth largest on record and the largest since 1984.  Read more...

 

Highway Agencies, Wildlife Ecologists Focus on Culverts in Climate Change Adaptation Planning     Wildlife may benefit from plans to rebuild aging or storm-damaged culverts in areas where extreme weather events are taking a toll. The critical role of the structures — essentially big pipes or concrete boxes carrying streams beneath roads — was demonstrated dramatically in a series of extreme weather events hitting the Northeast in recent years. In 2011, Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee washed out roads throughout mountains of New York and New England as culverts not designed for such enormous volumes of water were overwhelmed. The planned rebuilding of aging or storm-damaged culverts is giving ecologists a rare opportunity to help wildlife expand their range into cooler regions to adapt to climate change by eliminating barriers imposed by highways and poorly designed culverts. Read more… 

 

Maryland Assesses Impact of Rising Sea Levels    A report by the Maryland Climate Change Commission coupled with a new web tool from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration helps Maryland residents understand rising sea levels along the coast. The report predicts that climate change will inundate Maryland with up to six feet of seawater over the next century. Read more or View tool…

 

Warming Oceans Are Reshaping Fisheries     For the first time, scientists have shown that ocean warming has had a global impact on the mix of species caught by fishermen. Previous studies indicated that some species are shifting location in response to temperature increases, with fish gradually moving away from the equator into cooler waters. However, research published in May 2013 in Nature shows that species from warmer waters have also been replacing those traditionally caught in many fisheries worldwide at least since 1970.  Read more...

 

Climate change expected to impact Maine's forests    Unless people dramatically cut the amount of carbon dioxide they’re putting into the air and water through industry, farming, landfills and fossil fuel consumption, Maine’s largest manufacturing industry will be damaged in ways scientists can only begin to predict.  Read more...

 

Social media to help farmers deal with climate change    Whether farmers believe in climate change or not – 66 percent do – their actions show that they are adapting to global warming, according to panelists at a July 8 discussion at Cornell University.   “Farmers are already being affected by the changing climate, and the pace of change is likely to accelerate in the future,” said panelist Bill Hohenstein, director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Climate Change Program Office.  Read more...

 

Climate Change: Communities of Color and Tribes at Risk     Environmental and Energy Study Institute teamed up with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the Moapa Band of Paiute Indians, and the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) to hold a March 18 briefing on the disproportionate impacts of climate change on communities of color and tribal nations. Indeed, many communities of color exist in dense, congested urban areas, which disproportionately exposes them to air pollution, extreme weather events, and the heat island effect. Meanwhile, tribal nations face challenges to their way of life because of droughts and more severe climate variance.  Read more…

 

EPA's WaterSense-Labeled Products Save Americans Nearly $9 Billion     Consumers who invested in WaterSense-labeled products have saved a total of $8.9 billion in water and energy bills and 487 billion gallons of water since the program's inception in 2006.  In 2012 alone, WaterSense-labeled products helped to save more than 202 billion gallons of water.  Read more…

 

Researchers Stress the Importance of Knowledge Networks for Climate Change Adaptation    NOAA-funded researchers in the Great Lakes Region recently published an article for the journal Nature Climate Change on the importance of fostering knowledge networks for climate adaptation.  Read more...

 

NIACS Update - Adaptive silviculture study site gets going on the Chippewa National Forest    The Chippewa National Forest (CNF) is participating in the nationwide Adaptive Silviculture for Climate Change (ASCC) study, led by researchers affiliated with Michigan Tech, NIACS, and the Forest Service. The goals of this project are to to test different silvicultural approaches to climate change adaptation that will also serve as useful examples across the country. Read more...

 

URI awarded $1 million grant to lead national climate change education initiative     The University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) has been awarded a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to serve as the national hub for the Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance. The grant will enable the University to build a network of climate change scientists, educators, communication professionals, and government and private-sector stakeholders to educate the public about the science of climate change and its implications.  Read more…

 

Group Files Lawsuit to Protect Northeast Songbird    The Center for Biological Diversity, based in Vermont, is seeking to require the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the Bicknell's thrush as endangered. Read more…

 

Climate Change Forces Reevaluation of Fishery Management     For decades, fishery management has focused almost exclusively on the need to restrict fishing. Now, environmental changes are forcing fishermen and regulators to reevaluate their traditional practices.  Read more…

 

CAKE Library Highlight - Changing Climate, Changing Wildlife: A Vulnerability Assessment of 400 Species of Greatest Conservation Need and Game Species in Michigan     Michigan's climate has been warming, and the warming trend is accelerating. The best available science indicates the acceleration is likely to continue, and warming in the next 40 years will be roughly 10 times as fast as the warming over the past 100 years in Michigan. Read more…

 

 

 

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NCCWSC Chief and USGS Scientists Publish Editorial in Science Magazine     The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) Chief, Douglas Beard, and three other USGS scientists, Susan Haig, Thomas Martin, and Charles van Riper III, authored a July 19 editorial “Pathways for Conservation” in Science magazine where they argue that innovative tools and strategies can be used to meet the needs of a growing human population while conserving the planet’s natural systems.  Read more…

 

Climate Change Threatens N.E. Coastal Birds     The National Wildlife Federation recently released 'Shifting Skies', a large study accompanied by a more local report by the Natural Resources Council of Maine, detailing the adverse effects climate change is having on Northeastern birds such as Piping Plovers, Roseate Terns, and Saltmarsh Swallows. Read more  or Download report...

 

 

Getting Climate Smart: A Water Preparedness Guide for State Action (Natural Resources Defense Council and American Rivers)    The publication combines practical planning guidance with real world examples and case studies to demonstrate how states across the U.S. can develop and implement a climate preparedness plan to protect public health, communities, and natural resources. 2013. Read more...

 

Sea Level Rise Tool For Sandy Recovery     Hurricane Sandy is a vivid reminder that coastal communities are vulnerable to the risk of damage from storms and flooding. Sea level rise increases the frequency and severity of coastal flooding in human and natural systems, even if storm patterns remain the same. FEMA provides information about risk based on current conditions. By statutory requirement, FEMA’s Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) and other mapping products depict today's flood risk. Addressing flood risk based on current conditions has immediate, short-term benefits to communities, but does not adequately account for increasing flood risk resulting from sea level rise.  Read more…

 

Urban Land Institute Releases Report: "Risk & Resilience in Coastal Regions"    In January 2013, the Urban Land Institute convened an interdisciplinary group of market stakeholders to explore the implications of new environmental risks in coastal regions on real estate practices and markets.  In addition to individuals representing the diversity of the real estate industry, forum participants included professionals from the insurance industry, government, and nonprofit organizations.  This report summarizes the dialogue from the forum and identifies eight themes for future study.  Download the report…

 

Report Presents "The Impact of Climate Change and Population Growth on the National Flood Insurance Program through 2100"    A recent report prepared for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) presents the findings of one of three components of a project entitled "The Impact of Climate Change and Population Growth on the National Flood Insurance Program Through 2100 & Improving Coastal Floodplain Mapping."  Initiated in the fall of 2008, the project has significant implications for the protection of life and property nationwide, with three primary objectives: to evaluate the likely impact of climate change and population growth on the National Flood Insurance Program; to evaluate FEMA's Primary Frontal Dune regulations and policies; and, to evaluate a new coastal flood insurance zone.  Download the report…

 

Climate Aquatics Blog     The intent of the Climate-Aquatics Blog, organized by RMRS Research Fisheries Scientist Dan Isaak (http://1.usa.gov/15wRfTJ), is to provide a means for the field biologists, hydrologists, students, managers, and researchers to more broadly and rapidly discuss topical issues associated with aquatic ecosystems and climate change. Read more… 

 

Mussel byssus attachment weakened by ocean acidification.  This study examines biological structures critical for the success of ecologically and economically important bivalve mollusks. In the face of ocean acidification, weakened attachment presents a potential challenge for suspension-culture mussel farms and for intertidal communities anchored by mussel beds. Read more…

 

Do stream fish track climate change? Assessing distribution shifts in recent decades. Understanding the ability of species to shift their distribution ranges in response to climate change is crucial for conservation biologists and resources managers. This study provides evidence that stream fish are currently responding to recent climate warming at a greater rate than many terrestrial organisms. Read more... 

 

Projected Climate Impacts by State   Want to know how climate change will impact your state? Find out with these state-by-state reports on severe weather and carbon pollution from the White House Blog.  Read more...

 

Explore Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for the Northeast Region on EPA's Climate Change Website     Climate-related impacts are occurring across regions of the country and across many sectors of the U.S. economy.  EPA's Climate Change website provides relevant resources to those interested in learning more about expected climate change impacts and adaptation options.   Read more...

 

Hurricane Frequency and Strength to Increase with Climate Change    A new study published July 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that tropical cyclones are likely to become stronger and more frequent with climate change. The study finds that the world could experience up to 20 more hurricanes and tropical storms annually by the end of the century. Read more...

 

Ocean Acidification Impacts Entire Marine Ecosystems     Ocean acidification has farther reaching effects on marine ecosystems than previously realized, according a study published July 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers compared ecosystems in low, high, and extremely high areas of acidity by a volcano vent in Italy. They found that the low acidity areas had much higher concentrations of biodiversity. Read more...

 

Trees Found to Be Using Less Water as CO2 Concentrations Increase    An article published July 10 in the journal Nature concludes that trees in forests around the world are growing at the same rates but using less water to do so. Read more...

 

Climate Change Impacting U.S. Energy Infrastructure    According to a July 11 Department of Energy (DOE) report, climate-related extreme weather has already – and will continue to – put significant stress on U.S. energy infrastructure. The report notes that there are a range of impacts on all aspects of the energy systems in the United States, and that the costs are significant. Read more...

 

Sea Levels Could Rise 2.3 Meters for Each Degree of Warming    According to a study published July 15 in the Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences, sea levels could rise by 2.3 meters for each degree Celsius of global temperature increase. Read more...

 

Natural Features Can Protect Coastal Communities from Climate-Related Risks    A July 14 study published in Nature Climate Change by researchers at Stanford University finds that natural costal features such as sand dunes, coral reefs and sea grasses can protect coastal populations in the United States from the effects of climate change. Read more...

 

Forest Fires Release Particles that Add to Climate Change     A study published July 4 in Nature Communications concludes that wildfires may contribute to climate change more than previously thought. Read more…

 

'Rivers' in air could boost flooding    Only identified about 20 years ago, atmospheric rivers are intense bands of moisture that flow through the air.  Known to be responsible for heavy rainfall, they have been blamed for severe flooding in California and the UK.  The new study suggests that warmer conditions could create more rivers - and make them more severe.  Read more…

 

LMI-CliCKE (Climate Change Knowledge Engine)     Use LMI-CliCKE to explore, analyze, evaluate, and compare nearly 3,000 scientific findings related to climate change drawn from the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Users can search and filter climate change findings based on various criteria including: topic, source, geographic region, time period, and level of uncertainty. CliCKE allows you to focus on what is known and not known about climate change for the problem of interest to you.  Read more...

 

 

 

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GCPO LCC Releases RFP to Address Priority Knowledge Gaps     The Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GCPO LCC) issued a Research Request for Proposals today.  The GCPO LCC is soliciting proposals from interested groups and individuals that address high priority knowledge gaps associated with the science need themes identified in its Integrated Science Agenda, developed by the GCPO LCC’s technical Adaptation Science Management Team:  1) Linking habitat and population objectives and integrating multidisciplinary conservation goals.  2) Quantification and Evaluation of Relationships between Species and Landscape Endpoints for Priority Systems  3) Characterization of Flow  4) Evaluation and Assessment of Incentives for Natural Resource Management on Private Lands: Identification of Economic and Cultural Endpoints/Indicators  5) Targeting Science Need Themes in the GCPO LCC’s Integrated Science Agenda.  Deadline: August 30, 2013.  Read more…

 

Join: GCPO LCC's RFP Question & Answer session 

Date: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 

Time: 2:00 pm, Central Daylight Time (Chicago, GMT-05:00) 

Registration required, to register for this meeting, go to https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?ED=216096642&RG=1&UID=1470473607&RT=MiM3

 

Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership     The RFHP is a national partnership established to promote and facilitate the conservation of habitat for fish and other aquatic species in reservoir systems through collaborative actions that contribute to: The ecological health and function of reservoirs and their associated waters and watersheds; The restoration, protection and enhancement of fish and other aquatic species and communities, therein; The sustainability and enhancement of reservoir fisheries; Public awareness of the conservation issues and challenges facing reservoir and associated waters and watershed management in the 21st Century; The quality of life of the American people. Proposed projects can be focused on habitat issues in the reservoir proper and/or in watersheds above the reservoir and/or tailwaters below. Eligibility includes tribal governments. Deadline: 8/15/13.  Download RFP...

 

Midwest Glacial Lakes Partnership     MGLP, a fish habitat partnership, is seeking project proposals to benefit fish habitat in Midwestern lakes. Federal funding may be available under the National Fish Habitat Partnership through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to fund the top ranked proposals. Funds can only be used for on-the-ground habitat conservation and improvement projects and related design and monitoring activities. Eligibility: Any group that has the ability to plan, implement and evaluate a habitat project that benefits a lake(s). Deadline: 9/1/13.  Download RFP...

 

Tribal Wildlife Grants FY2014 (USFWS)     Tribal Wildlife Grants are used to provide technical and financial assistance to Tribes for the development and implementation of programs that benefit fish and wildlife resources and their habitat. Eligibility: Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized). Deadline: 9/3/13.  Read more...

 

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative-Partners for Fish and Wildlife 2013 Grant (USFWS)     The US Fish and Wildlife Service, Partners for Fish and Wildlife (PFW) Program anticipates funding wetland and associated upland habitat restoration and enhancement projects for conservation of native Great Lakes fish and wildlife populations, particularly migratory birds. Restoration projects will be completed on privately owned (non-federal/non-state) lands. Eligibility includes Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized) and Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments). Deadline: 9/30/13.  Read more...

 

Coastal Program - Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant (USFWS)     The Coastal Program is a voluntary, incentive-based program that provides technical and financial assistance to coastal communities and landowners to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat on public and private lands. The Coastal Program Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding is available to coastal areas within the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin which includes parts of Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. Eligibility includes Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized). Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments). Deadline: 9/30/13.  Read more...