The University of Massachusetts Amherst
 
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Michael Maroney

Professor

Research in my group involves using biophysical, molecular biological and synthetic model approaches to elucidate the structure of transition metal sites in proteins and enzymes, and investigate how these sites function in biology.

Current Research
We have focused our efforts on nickel biochemistry and redox systems involving S-donor ligands. Systems that are of current interest in my group include proteins involved in nickel trafficking, and several enzymes including hydrogenase, superoxide dismutase and cysteine dioxygenase.

Learn more at people.chem.umass.edu/mmaroney/

Academic Background

  • BS Iowa State University, 1977
  • PhD University of Washington, 1981
  • Postdoctoral Training: Northwestern University 1983, University Minnesota, 1983-1985
Higgins, Khadine A.; Carr, Carolyn E.; Maroney, Michael J. Specific Metal Recognition in Nickel Trafficking. Biochemistry (2012), 51(40), 7816-7832.
Flagg, Shannon C.; Giri, Nitai; Pektas, Serap; Maroney, Michael J. ; Knapp, Michael J. Inverse Solvent Isotope Effects Demonstrate Slow Aquo Release from Hypoxia Inducible Factor-Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2). Biochemistry (2012), 51(33), 6654-6666.
Greene, Brandon L.; Joseph, Crisjoe A.; Maroney, Michael J. ; Dyer, R. Brian. Direct Evidence of Active-Site Reduction and Photodriven Catalysis in Sensitized Hydrogenase Assemblies. From Journal of the American Chemical Society, (2012), 134(27), 11108-11111.
Higgins, Khadine A.; Chivers, Peter T.; Maroney, Michael J. Role of the N-terminus in determining metal-specific responses in the E. coli. Ni and Co responsive metalloregulator, RcnR. From Journal of the American Chemical Society (2012), 134(16), 7081-7093.
Banaszak, Katarzyna; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Bellucci, Matteo; Zambelli, Barbara; Rypniewski, Wojciech; Maroney, Michael J. ; Ciurli, Stefano. Crystallographic and X- ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of Helicobacter pylori UreE bound to Ni2+ and Zn2+ reveals a role for the disordered C- terminal arm in metal trafficking. Biochemical Journal (2012), 441(3), 1017-1026.
 
Contact Info

Department of Chemistry
N373 Life Sciences Laboratory
240 Thatcher Way
Amherst, MA 01003-9292

(413) 545-4876
mmaroney@chem.umass.edu

people.chem.umass.edu/mmaroney/