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David A. Sela

Assistant Professor

The overarching goal of our research program is to better understand the means by which food promotes health. We seek solutions to chronic diseases primarily through preventative dietary and lifestyle adjustments. Our research involves sequence-based genomic approaches to investigate the microorganisms that assemble into various communities in and on the human body. These ecosystems are often collectively referred to as the human microbiome. In addition, we are determined to characterize mechanistic linkages between food and health emanating from host-microbial molecular interactions.

Current Research

Our group utilizes massively parallel DNA sequencing, and other high-throughput systems approaches to investigate molecular and physiological interactions at the human-microbial interface. We resolve the evolutionary history and relationships between our resident microbial commensals in addition to investigating the biological functional attributes of isolates and aggregate communities alike. Accordingly, we study the influences of dietary molecules on the community structure of various human microbiomes, and their effect of human health throughout development. Our model in this endeavor is milk’s role in influencing the composition and function of the infant gut microbial community. To this end, we seek partnerships with industrial and clinical partners in order to translate the scientific knowledge we learn in our research activities. 

Learn more at www.selalab.org/

Academic Background

  • BS State University of New York, New Paltz 2003
  • MS University of California, Davis 2006
  • PhD University of California, Davis 2010
  • Postdoctoral Training: Stanford Universirty
  • Postdoctoral Training: Foods for Health Institute, University of California, Davis
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
The genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveals adaptations for milk utilization within the infant microbiome. DA Sela, J Chapman, A Adeuya, JH Kim, F Chen, TR Whitehead, A Lapidus, DA Mills. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105 (48), 18964 202 2008
 
Contact Info

Department of Food Science
340 Chenoweth Laboratory
Amherst, MA 01003

(413) 545-1010
davidsela@umass.edu

www.selalab.org/