Upcoming Online Courses

Below are the online courses currently being offered through the Journalism Department, or that are planned for the upcoming semesters.

All courses are provided in an asynchronous mode. This means that there are no scheduled meeting times and students can therefore self-pace their learning so long as they meet the deadlines set by the instructor over the course of the semester. All courses are taught by full-time and part-time members of our faculty, and are delivered through University+, UMass' online education program that ensures high standards.

If enrollment for a course is open, you can register for it by clicking the enrollment button adjacent to the course description. This will take you to the University+ information page for that course, which provides additional details (including the total cost). Additional information about enrollment in University+ courses is available here, and information about financial aid is available here.


Summer Session A (May. 21 - Jul. 3)

JOURNAL 235: Introduction to Public Relations (Jennie Donohue)

This course addresses the principles and practices of public relations and strategic communication in the public, private, for-profit and no-profit arenas. Course includes lectures, readings, multimedia viewings and student-engaged, collaborative and classroom and online learning methods. (3 credits)
Open to all students. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level public relations courses.

JOURNAL 300: Newswriting and Reporting(Steve Fox)

This course covers the basic requirements of newswriting and reporting, including interviewing, covering news events, and more. This class will include in-class and outside reporting assignments. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGLWRIT 112. The instructor has said they are willing to provide overrides for students who have not met the pre-requisites for this course. Please contact the instructor for an override. This course satisfies the Junior Year Writing requirement.

JOURNAL 333: Introduction to Visual Storytelling (Olga Kyle)

In introduction to Visual Storytelling, students will become better producers and consumers of visual media. Students will develop a deeper visual literacy by studying topics like visual ethics, aesthetics, agency, and the currents of the modern visual journalism ecosystem. By reporting their own video, photography and data visualization projects, students will learn how to control exposure with a DSLR camera, how to capture quality video and how to use different editing and production software. (4 credits)
This course meets the AT general education requirement. Open to all students.

JOURNAL 392S: Opinion Writing: Columns (Razvan Sibii)

Basic training in writing editorials, columns and broadcast commentary with an emphasis on political and social policies. How to encourage the persuaded, nudge the neutral and discomfit the opposition. The ability to write quickly will be stressed. Several short (two-page) papers. (4 credits)
Prerequisites:


Summer Session B (Jul. 8 - Aug. 16)

JOURNAL 201: Introduction to Journalism (Kelsey Whipple)

Introduction to Journalism is a survey class that covers the basic principles and practices of contemporary journalism. By studying fundamentals like truth telling, fact checking, the First Amendment, diversity, the watchdog role of the press and public engagement, students will explore the role of the journalist in a democratic society. Students will also assess changes in the production, distribution and consumption of journalism through new technologies. Students will examine case studies across the media, and learn how different audiences, media and perspectives affect the news. (4 credits)
This course meets the DU and SB general education requirements. Open to all students.

JOURNAL 250: News Literacy (Steve Fox)

What is fact? What is fiction? Can we even tell the difference any more? Today's 24-hour news environment is saturated with a wide array of sources ranging from real-time citizen journalism reports, government propaganda and corporate spin to real-time blogging, photos and videos from around the world, as well as reports from the mainstream media. In this class, students will become more discerning consumers of news. Students will use critical-thinking skills to develop the tools needed to determine what news sources are reliable in the digital world. Through readings, class discussion and written assignments, students will deconstruct stories, breaking down broadcast, print, web, and social media stories to determine those that are well-sourced and can be considered real news. Students will also discuss concepts such as objectivity, opinion, bias and fairness and how all contribute to the mix of news reports in today's digital landscape. (4 credits)
This course meets the DU and SB general education requirements. Open to all students.

JOURNAL 345: Media Criticism (Razvan Sibii)

American journalism is going through what might be the greatest upheaval in its history. This course examines the causes of this upheaval -- technological, economic, cultural, ideological -- and their current and prospective impact. It also looks at some efforts to set standards for the performance of journalists. (3 credits)
This course meets the DG and SB general education requirements. Open to all students.

JOURNAL 492M: Magazine Writing (Connie Griffin)

This four-credit writing course introduces students to the different forms of magazine writing, including short features and essays, longer-form pieces, first-person narratives, profiles and human-interest feature stories. Students will generate story ideas, develop research strategies, cultivate sources, research markets, and submit queries for publication in print and online formats. Students will read and discuss articles from a range of popular, literary, and trade magazines, and, in a community of peer writers, they will write, review and revise several works of their own. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: JOURNAL 300. The instructor has said they are willing to provide overrides for students who have not met the pre-requisites for this course. Please contact the instructor for an override.

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