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How Scholars and Activists Can Partner for Reproductive and Racial Justice: A Conversation with Loretta Ross and Rickie Solinge
The newly restored Old Chapel crackled with energy on the morning of November 30, as an over-capacity crowd gathered to hear activist Loretta Ross and public scholar Rickie Solinger reflect on their decades-long collaboration to advance the movement for reproductive justice. 

On Friday, October 20, a crowded house of social scientists, computer scientists, and planners gathered in the new ISSR lab to discuss insights emerging from a National Science Foundation funded project on the social sciences and big data. Leading the dialogue were the project’s principal investigators, who have each been program directors at the National Science Foundation: Susan Sterett, Director of the School of Public Policy and Professor of Political Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Kelly Joyce, Director of the Science, Technology & Society Center and Professor of Sociology at Drexel University.

Enobong (Anna) Branch, associate professor of sociology and former ISSR Scholar, has been appointed by Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy to the position of associate chancellor for equity and inclusion and chief diversity officer.

Pathways and Potholes for Women in Science authors

Some sixty members of the University community turned out for the launch of a new volume of research that offers new insights on the realities of women's careers in science. The volume, entitled Pathways, Potholes, and the Persistence of Women in Science: Reconsidering the Pipeline (Lexington Books), is edited by UMass Professor of Sociology and Chancellor's Faculty Advisor for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence  Dr. Enobong (Anna) Branch. With an introduction by Dr. Craig Martin, Professor of Chemistry at UMass Amherst, the panel of three of the volume's authors drew from research across academic and industry science settings to illustrate the supports and constraints that shape women's journeys through careers in science.

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Elisa Martinez, Doctoral Candidate in Sociology and Program Assistant at ISSR, has co-authored the chapter "Empowerment and HIV Risk Reduction among Sex Workers in Bangladesh" in the edited volume Women's Empowerment and Global Health: A Twenty-first Century Agenda (University of California Press).

ISSR Director profile picture

In the Social Science Research Council's online forum ItemsISSR Director Laurel Smith-Doerr (UMass|Sociology) and Jennifer Croissant (University of Arizona|Sociology) discuss the catch-22 that confronts women when it comes to collaboration in scientific research.

Banu Subramaniam

Our warmest congratulations to Dr. Banu Subramaniam, Professor in the Department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, who was awarded the highly coveted 2016 Ludvik Fleck Prize by the Society for Social Studies of Science (4s).

The award celebrates Subramaniam's 2014 book Ghost Stories for Darwin: The Science of Variation and the Politics of Diversity (University of Illinois Press).  In announcing its decision, the Fleck Prize committee writes that "Subramaniam has written a brilliant book that is optimistic and hopeful, that places imagination at the center of knowing, and brightly illuminates the spectacularly interesting and exciting relationships and knowledges that are possible if we embrace variation." For her part, Dr. Subramaniam calls the book "a case for the critical need to understand the co-constitution of gender, race, sexuality, and nation, and their co-production with and through the institutions and histories of science and feminism."

In a world where Black Lives Matter I imagine...

The week of March 23-30, 2016 saw an exciting convergence of dialogues and debates across UMass and the Five Colleges, centering on the histories, implications and legacies of Black liberation struggles. The many events sponsored by diverse centers and departments offered and an opportunity to raise the level of our campus’ thought and action in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. The Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) was pleased to collaborate with the Psychology of Peace and Violence Program (PPVP) to open and close the week’s events with two important conversations exploring how methodological innovation in social science can, and does, offer scholars committed to racial justice a range of pathways for advancing the cause.

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