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The “replication crisis” that is raising questions about the reliability of scientific research has been widely discussed in the fields of psychology and medicine, but has important ramifications for all scientists –social and natural. At a jam-packed April 8 seminar co-hosted by ISSR and the Computational Social Sciences Institute, ISSR Assistant Director Henry Renski (Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning) moderated a panel of five scholars from across the Colleges of Information and Computer SciencesNatural Sciences, and Social & Behavioral Sciences, as they explored key issues, implications, and attempted remedies that this replication debate has raised. The lively discussion that ensued points to a hunger to respond to the epistemological, methodological and institutional questions that underlie the replication debate.

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What do moose fat, algae blooms, classroom and office assignments, urban residential segregation and crackling fireplaces have in common? A fascinating showcase of research by scholars and practitioners from around the Five Colleges showed how spatial analysis – the study of social and material dynamics through their patterns in physical space – can offer new layers of understanding about the natural and social patterns and inequalities all around us. 

POLISCI  797SR - 01  Survey Research Methods
Wednesdays 4:00-6:30 pm
 
Description: This course will focus on advanced topics in survey design and analysis. Topics covered include different approaches to sampling, how to construct and use survey weights, and tools for analyzing and enriching survey data, including approaches to conducting matching and multiple imputation, as well as the construction and analysis of panel data. The course will also focus on designing and analyzing survey experiments.
 

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