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On April 4, the co-PIs presented the final report of a one-year project funded by the National Science Foundation's research program on the Future of Work at Human-Technology Frontiers. The project, Understanding Emerging Technologies, Racial Equity and the Future of Work, convened experts in the social sciences, computational sciences and engineering to articulate the knowledge needed to shape emergent techologies that are equitable and result in "good" jobs for a wider range of workers, and elicited broader stakeholder feedback on this academic conversation.  

View the report here.

Update to the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, by Carol Bova, PhD RN April 17 2019

On April 19, 2019, Dr. Carol Bova, PhD, RN and IRB Chairperson at the UMass Medical School presented on the recent updates to Federal policy for the protection of human subjects. 

Some Tips for Collaboration and some meditations on Equality. Presentation by John N. Parke, NSF. First slide.

On February 8, 2019, John N. Parker facilitated the first UMass ADVANCE Research Collaboration workshop with an engaging talk on how collaboration and equity leads to better science.

 

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On February 8, 2019, John N. Parker facilitated the first UMass ADVANCE Research Collaboration workshop with an engaging talk on how collaboration and equity leads to better science. Parker is Program Officer for the Science, Technology and Society and Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM programs at the National Science Foundation. He is also Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability and Senior Fellow, Barrett, The Honors College at Arizona State University.

U.S. Census Bureau logo

Do you use census data?  Now is your opportunity to ensure continued access to the data products that are important for your work.The American Sociological Association urges you to submit your comment on proposed changes to the U.S. Census Bureau data products. The period for submitting comments to the Federal Register ends September 17. See the ASA call for input for details to register your voice.

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An interdisciplinary UMass team led by ISSR Director Laurel Smith-Doerr (PI) and Co-PIs Enobong (Anna) Branch, Shlomo Zilberstein, Henry Renski, and Shannon Roberts has received a National Science Foundation conference grant funded under one of the NSF Ten Big Ideas—the Future of Work at Human-Technology Frontiers (HTF). On April 5-6th, the Institute for Social Science Research convened renowned social scientists, computer scientists, engineers and influential professionals from across the U.S. for the second of three meetings funded by this grant, to consider the question of racial equity in how scholars understand emerging technologies and the workplace.

COSSA logo

This week, the federal agencies regulated under the Common Rule, the set of regulations governing human subjects research, released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would delay implementation of revisions to the Common Rule by an additional six months, setting a new compliance date of January 21, 2019. The stated rationale for the delay is to “provide additional time to regulated entities for the preparations necessary to implement the 2018 Requirements.” The Obama-era changes had been originally scheduled to go into effect on January 19, 2018 but were delayed by an Interim Final Rule announced in January 2018 that pushed the compliance date by six months, to July 19, 2018, and indicated that further delays might be proposed. The rulemaking process to update the Common Rule has been in progress since 2011 (read COSSA’s summary of the changes). The regulations themselves have not been updated since 1991.

Academia's Crisis of Relevance and the Engaged Scholar

On December 7, 2017, Professor Andrew Hoffman (University of Michigan) delivered a provocative talk arguing that scientists must engage beyond the Academy, in order to remain relevant and inform important public debates. In his remarks, he emphasized the lessons we have already learned on how to do so effectively, and the questions we must continue to address in order to make good on this central, and oft-overlooked, purpose of science.

On Friday, October 20, a crowded house of social scientists, computer scientists, and planners gathered in the new ISSR lab to discuss insights emerging from a National Science Foundation funded project on the social sciences and big data. Leading the dialogue were the project’s principal investigators, who have each been program directors at the National Science Foundation: Susan Sterett, Director of the School of Public Policy and Professor of Political Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Kelly Joyce, Director of the Science, Technology & Society Center and Professor of Sociology at Drexel University.

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