University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Tegemea Mwalingo

Involvement: 

Award: 

Graduate Student Dissertation Award

School or College: 

College of Natural Sciences

Mentor: 

Rebecca Spencer

Bio: 

Tegemea is a Ph.D. Candidate from Ellaine Marieb College of Nursing working under the mentorship of Dr. Carrie-Ellen Briere. Her research broadly focuses on creating community and clinical solutions to improve neonatal and maternal health outcomes and wellbeing. Her dissertation will examine the relationship between community engagement practices and maternal and child health service utilization and health outcomes. Specifically, she will be looking at different local community-driven community engagement practices in maternal and child health services and how those practices affect service maternal and neonatal health service utilization and outcomes.

Research: 

My research examines the relationship between community engagement practices and maternal and neonatal health service utilization and outcomes using a Mixed-Methods Case Comparative Design. The researcher aims to 1) describe local community-initiated maternal and child health community engagement practices of communities in Tanzania, 2) describe the differences and similarities of the community engagement practices of different Tanzanian communities,3) describe neonatal and maternal health service utilization and health outcomes of the selected Tanzanian communities and, 4) describe the relationship between local communities’ maternal and child health community engagement practices and neonatal and maternal health services utilization and outcomes. 

The data and knowledge connecting local communities' engagement practices and maternal and health service utilization and outcomes are critical to providing the foundation for integrating, designing, and scaling up community engagement strategies in the existing maternal and child health service provision systems. Improved community engagement practices can improve access to quality maternal and child health services and eventually improve maternally and neonatal health outcomes.  

 

Student Award Academic Year: