International and National Awards

International and National Awards

National Academies

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine produce groundbreaking reports that have helped shape sound policies, inform public opinion, and advance the pursuit of science, engineering, and medicine.

Members are elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Membership is a widely accepted mark of excellence in science and is considered one of the highest honors that a scientist can receive. Current NAS membership totals approximately 2,350 members and 485 foreign associates, of whom approximately 190 have received Nobel prizes.

Learn about the National Academy of Sciences

NAS Members

  • NAS Member 2019: Lila M. Gierasch

Election to National Academy of Engineering membership is one of the highest professional honors accorded an engineer. Members have distinguished themselves in business and academic management, in technical positions, as university faculty, and as leaders in government and private engineering organizations. Members are elected to NAE membership by their peers (current NAE members).

Learn about the National Academy of Engineering

NAE Members

  • NAE Member 2015: John Klier
  • NAE Member 2010: Laura Haas
  • NAE Member 2008: Thomas Russell

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship

Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for individuals who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. Fellowships are awarded through two annual competitions: one open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States and Canada, and the other open to citizens and permanent residents of Latin America and the Caribbean. Candidates must apply to the Guggenheim Foundation in order to be considered in either of these competitions.

Learn about Guggenheim Fellowships

Fellowship Recipients (Year and Field of Study)

  • 2018: Felipe Salles (Music Composition)
  • 2016: Nicholas Bromell (American Literature)
  • 2014: Young Moon (Fine Arts)
  • 2011: Alon Confino (German and East European History)
  • 2009: Alice Harris (Linguistics)
  • 2007: Sabina Murray (Fiction)
  • 2006: Martin Espada (Poetry)
  • 2006: William Meeks (Mathematics)
  • 2005: Peter Gizzi (Poetry)
  • 2003: Neil Immerman (Computer Science)
  • 2003: Max Page (Architecture, Planning and Design)
  • 2000: Elizabeth Vierling (Plant Sciences)
  • 1992: Robert Hallock (Physics)
  • 1992: John McCarthy (Linguistics)
  • 1991: Dara Wier (Poetry)
  • 1986: Lila Gierasch (Molecular and Cellular Biology)

    National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency created in 1965. It is one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States.

    Because democracy demands wisdom, NEH serves and strengthens our republic by promoting excellence in the humanities and conveying the lessons of history to all Americans. The Endowment accomplishes this mission by awarding grants for top-rated proposals examined by panels of independent, external reviewers.

    Learn about NEH Grants

    Grant Recipients

    • NEH 2015: Aviva Ben-Ur
    • NEH 2012: Sarah Cornell
    • NEH 2006: Barbara Krauthamer
    • NEH 2005: Jennifer Heuer
    • NEH 2005: Roberta Marvin 
    • NEH 2004: Julie Hayes
    • NEH 2004: Brian Ogilvie
    • NEH 2003: Barbara Krauthamer
    • NEH 2002: Gretchen Gerzina
    • NEH 2002: Ellen Pader 
    • NEH 2000: Marla Miller
    • NEH 1999: Aviva Ben-Ur
    • NEH 1993: David Glassberg
    • NEH 1990: Alice Harris  
    • NEH 1990: Joseph Levine

    American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellows

    A member whose efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications are scientifically or socially distinguished and who has been a continuous member for the four year period leading up to the year of nomination, may, by virtue of such meritorious contribution be elected a Fellow by the Council. In a tradition stretching back to 1874, these individuals are recognized for their extraordinary achievements across disciplines. Examples of areas in which nominees may have made significant contributions are research; teaching; technology; services to professional societies; administration in academe, industry, and government; and communicating and interpreting science to the public. Fellows are elected annually by the AAAS Council from the list of approved nominations from the Section Steering Groups.

    Learn about AAAS Fellowships

    Fellows

    • AAAS 2018: Dimitrios Maroudas
    • AAAS 2017: Prashant Shenoy
    • AAAS 2015: Michael Maroney 
    • AAAS 2015: John McCarthy
    • AAAS 2014: Derek Lovley
    • AAAS 2012: Maria Santore 
    • AAAS 2012: Gabriela Weaver
    • AAAS 2011: Chul Park
    • AAAS 2010: S. Thayumanavan
    • AAAS 2009: Raymond S. Bradley 
    • AAAS 2009: Peter K. Hepler
    • AAAS 2009: Vincent Rotello
    • AAAS 2009: Lynnette Leidy Sievert
    • AAAS 2002: Thomas P. Russell
    • AAAS 2002: Elizabeth Vierling
    • AAAS 1989: Lila M. Gierasch

    Timeline for AAAS

    • Call for Nominations: January-June
      • Submit online nominations with co-nominator
      • Two Members may nominate someone
      • International Honorary Members may be one of the co-nominators
      • The Co-Nominators must be from different institutions
    • Preliminary Evaluation Ballot: October-December
      • Vote online for candidates in your selection
      • Selection Panels review, discuss and select who goes to the appraisal list
    • Appraisal List: January-March
      • Vote for candidates across all classes and sections
      • Class Committees review results and make recommendations for election
    • Election: March-April
      • Council and Board of Directors review and approve the final slate of candidates
      • Elected Members are announced in mid-April
    • Induction: October
      • You made it!