Diversity Reports

Top Issues for Latino Voters in Swing States for the 2020 Election

October, 2020
by
Rodrigo Dominguez-Villegas & Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Report

Latino voters are critical to electoral outcomes in four battleground states: Arizona, Florida, Nevada, and Texas. The economy, healthcare, the coronavirus outbreak, and racial and ethnic inequality are the most important issues for Latino registered voters going into the 2020 election. In this report, we provide evidence that shows why these 4 issues are at the top of Latinos’ concerns in 2020 in the 4 states where Latino voters are most likely to influence the results of the election.

This study is a collaboration between the UCLA Latino Policy and Politcs Intiative and the CEE.

Read the Study  |  Download the PDF

How COVID Exposes Healthcare Deficits for Black Workers

August, 2020
by
Caroline Pryor, Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed large cracks in our national healthcare system, particularly for low-wage and minority workers. One specific disparity is the high proportion of Black Americans and other minorities who have fallen ill or died from the disease. Using state- level data on employment and COVID infections, this report examines the link between employment in direct customer service work, COVID infection rates, and COVID-linked racial health disparities. 

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Stressed, Unsafe, and Insecure: Essential Workers Need A New, New Deal

June, 2020
by
Clare Hammonds, Jasmine Kerrissey & Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Report

With some of the strongest labor protections in the country, Massachusetts is probably one of the best states to be an essential worker. Even with those protections, our survey of over 2500 essential workers in Massachusetts from April 24 to May 1, 2020 found they faced widespread safety, stress, and family insecurity hardships. The hardships we found for essential workers in Massachusetts are likely to be even worse elsewhere in the country. 

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Collecting LGBT+ Data for Diversity: Initiating Self-ID

April, 2020
by
M. V. Lee Badgett
Brief

This report and the series are designed to explore the business rationale and goals of IBM and other companies when adopting inclusive policies and practices, to assess the impact of the policies and practices, and to provide insight for employers who might learn from the experiences of innovators. The series will also serve learning goals for students and other relevant practitioners. After a brief introduction, this report describes how IBM’s selfID process works. The second section describes how IBM arrived at this moment, and the third and fourth sections describe implementation and the uses of the data. The final section looks ahead to the future of the practice.

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The COVID-19 Recession: An Opportunity to Reform our Low Wage Economy?

March, 2020
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, Rodrigo Dominguez-Villegas & Eric Hoyt
Brief

Almost 80% of all U.S. private sector employment is in the service sector, totally some 129 million jobs. The coronavirus pandemic poses a unique threat to these, either by eliminating jobs or putting workers at greater risk of infection. They are also among the least equipped to deal with these risks. 69% of service workers are low-wage, or making less than $15 an hour.  58% do not have paid sick leave, 61% have no or inadequate health insurance, and very few have paid family leave to care for the sick and dying. Our analysis further pinpoints the states, industries, and demographic groups where these low-wage workers are most likely to be found, and provides recommendations for better assisting those most at risk. 

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Where Are the Hispanic Executives?

January, 2020
by
J.D. Swerzenski, Donald Tomaskovic-Devey & Eric Hoyt
Brief

Despite their status as the largest U.S. minority group, among the four largest U.S. ethnic groups Hispanics executives are the least likely to get executive level jobs. As our analysis of EEOC employment data for large and mid-sized companies shows, these rates vary greatly by city. This overview of the top and bottom 5 cities for Hispanic representation (culled from the top 50 largest U.S. metro areas) highlights some of the geographic, economic, historical, and cultural factors behind these variations. We find the top cities offer possible strategies for increasing Hispanic participation in executive positions,  including support for Hispanic business development groups and in acknowledging cultural blindspots that often exclude Hispanics from executive positions. 

Read the full article through The Conversation.

The EEOC Should Continue To Collect Pay Data

November, 2019
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Opinon

In September, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced that it will not continue the collection of pay data it was ordered to initiate this summer by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. And this week, the EEOC will hold hearings on pay data collection’s future. 

This is deeply troubling for a number of reasons. Pay data collection by the EEOC is a win-win — it promises to increase government efficiency, reduce regulatory burden and improve private sector human resource practices; while also reducing unfair gender and race-based pay disparities.

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Race, States, and the Mixed Fate of White Men

January, 2019
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey & Eric Hoyt
Report

A great deal of media attention has been placed on the perceived threat to White male employment. Has the entrance of more women and minority men into the labor market made it harder for White men to secure jobs, or has this competition helped push White men into more desirable jobs? Using data collected by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) from private sector firms with more than 100 employees (50 if federal contractors), our analysis explores employment diversity in these workplaces to better understand for where competition is greatest. The general pattern shows that educated White men are strongly advantaged in their access to upper class jobs in states with large minority populations, while those with less education face increased labor market competition for working class positions. 

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Is Silicon Valley Tech Diversity Possible Now?

January, 2018
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey & Joo-Hee Han
Report

In this report, we ask a set of new questions: Are all of the largest firms in the Northern California Tech sector consistently tilted toward white men? Or, as we suspect, is there important firm variation in the ability to recruit and retain a more diverse workforce? Are there firms that demonstrate that diversity is currently possible in Silicon Valley?  In this report we show that some firms have figured out how to thrive with racially and gender diverse workforces, so now the question becomes why some don't ?

Read the Full Report  |  Download the PDF

Count and Compare: One Strategy for Reducing Discrimination

January, 2018
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey
Opinon

In this report, we ask a set of new questions: Are all of the largest firms in the Northern California Tech sector consistently tilted toward white men? Or, as we suspect, is there important firm variation in the ability to recruit and retain a more diverse workforce? Are there firms that demonstrate that diversity is currently possible in Silicon Valley?  In this report we show that some firms have figured out how to thrive with racially and gender diverse workforces, so now the question becomes why some don't?

Employer’s Responses to Sexual Harassment

January, 2018
by
Carly McCann, Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, and M. V. Lee Badgett
Report

#MeToo, #TimesUp, and related movements have brought renewed attention to workplace sexual harassment. However in everyday workplaces, the vast majority of allegations go unreported, and those that do report tend to face troubling outcomes.

Our research, recently released by the University of Massachusetts-Amherst’s Center for Employment Equity, analyzed all sexual harassment complaints filed with the U.S Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and state Fair Employment Practices Agencies (FEPA) between 2012-2016. We find that nearly all sexual harassment goes unreported, but those that do report tend to face severe retribution and limited redress.

Read the Report  |  Download the PDF

Who’s Getting the Skilled Blue Collar Jobs? A Look into the Top and Bottom 5 States

January, 2018
by
Eric Hoyt & J.D. Swerzenski
Brief

Surveying press coverage around blue collar employment over the past several years, it’s often been the case that “blue collar” has in fact acted shorthand for  white working class men. Our focus in this report is to expand the conversation by examining the racial employment diversity among skilled craft and trade workers, a slice of the blue collar labor market including carpenters, mechanics, plumbers, and more. So who actually is getting these high-paying blue-collar jobs, and to what degree does the press narrative around blue collar employment hold up? Our analysis reveals that the craft workforce is racially diverse and geographically varied, but overwhelmingly male-dominated.

Here’s the clearest picture of Silicon Valley’s diversity yet: It’s bad. But some companies are doing less bad

January, 2018
by
By Sinduja Rangarajan
Report

This report was published by Reveal: The Center for Investigative Reporting in collaboration with the Center for Employment Equity. 

Ten large technology companies in Silicon Valley did not employ a single black woman in 2016. Three had no black employees at all. Six did not have a single female executive. In stark contrast, women outnumbered men in the executive ranks of two Silicon Valley companies, and at another firm, nearly a third of executives were women of color. A first-of-its kind analysis of 177 of the largest San Francisco Bay Area tech firms by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting found that while racial and gender disparities are grave, many companies haven’t been held back by conventional excuses.

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New Evidence from the Frontlines on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination

January, 2017
by
M. V. Lee Badgett, Amanda Baumle, and Steven Boutcher
Report

In this report, we analyze data on the 9,121 SOGI discrimination charges filed with the EEOC or with a state or local fair employment practices agency (FEPA) between 2013 and 2016. These charges provide an unprecedented view into the situations where employees believe that they have faced discrimination because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. We report on trends in charge filing over time and on patterns by industry, issues raised and outcomes of the charges. 

Employment Patterns in the Oil & Gas Industries [Report]

January, 2016
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

There are three industries central to the production and distribution of oil and gas in the United States. Oil and Gas Extraction is a mining industry. Petroleum and Coal Manufacturers convert both energy sources to usable fuels. Gas pipelines is a transportation industry delivering oil and natural gas from production sites to consumption. The latter is not exhaustive as some transportation is also done by rail and truck, although these cannot be identified separately.

In this report we use information from EEO-1 reports and from the American Community Survey to assess the degree of employment equity in these three oil and gas related industries. The EEO- 1 reports describe workplace level employment composition and are submitted to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by private sector employers with 100 or more employees, 50 or more if government contractors. The American Community Survey is collected by the U.S. Bureau of the Census and is used to describe the U.S. population. 

Private Sector Industry Disparities: A Report on Evidence of Systemic Disparities for Women, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans

January, 2012
by
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, Karen Brummond, JooHee Han, Skylar Davidson
Report

Prepared for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission We grade U.S. private sector industries based on 2012 group employment disparities. The EEOC primarily responds to discrimination complaints from citizens. When evaluating these complaints investigators often refer to EEO-1 data on workplace employment distributions compared to the available labor force to develop an estimate of employment disparity. Using the same logic, we produce industry estimates of employment disparities. The report may be useful in a number of ways. It is possible for the EEOC to issue Commissioner’s charges when systemic bias is suspected. This report identifies industries that might be considered for Commissioner’s charges. The OFCCP currently selects firms for random audits of their employment practices.

This report provides additional information useful for more targeted enforcement. Finally, the report could be useful if regulatory authorities wanted to identify industries with particularly good records to single out for public praise. We employ 2012 EEO-1 private sector reports of annual reporting establishment workforce composition to produce industry level employment disparity and segregation estimates. This is a preliminary report and we look for ways to tailor the report more closely to the needs of the regulatory, employee, and business communities. We focus on four types of workplace disparity: overall employment representation, managerial representation , occupational segregation, and wage gaps. We describe industry variation in these employment outcomes for women, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. We use 2007-2011 American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) to compute a set of expected employment baselines and to estimate industry level wage disparities. Wage gap results are computed from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS). We limited the 2012 EEO-1 data to single establishment employer reports, multiple establishment firms’ individual establishment reports, and multiple establishment firms’ headquarters reports. We examined data only for establishments with at least 50 employees.

Read the full report here.