EXTREME TEMPERATURES

It is not unusual to experience drastic environmental temperature changes in New England. Extreme condition may last mutiple days and sometimes pose life-threatening situations. Call 911 or UMPD (413-545-3111) if you experience a life-threatening emergency. 

 

EXTREME HEAT

Extreme heat can present a risk of heat exhuastion and more severe heat stroke, which is a medical emergency in which your body is unable to cool itself down and loses the ability to control it's temperature.

Symptoms of heat stroke may include: 

  • Hot, red, dry or damp skin
  • Fast, strong pulse
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion
  • Loss of consciousness/passing out

Watch for sign of heat stroke - if you begin to experience symptoms, call 911 or UMPD (413-545-3111) immediately for emergency medical attention.

More information about the health risks associated with heat-related illness, visit the CDC.

Be prepared for the heat:

  • Avoid the outdoors, if possible
    • If you must go outside, try to limit your time and seek out a cool place for breaks.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, such as water or cold beverages that can replace salt and minerals depleted from sweating. Avoid alcohol, caffeinated, and sugary drinks.
  • Protect yourself from the sun:
    • Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and sunscreen, reapply according to package directions.
  • Wear lightweight clothing
  • Do not leave children or pets in cars, even if the windows are cracked open.

The National Weather Service provides a Heat Index Chart as a metric is monitor personal safety in hot conditions:

EXTREME COLD

Extreme cold can present a risk of hypothermia, a medical emergency in which your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat resulting in a dangerously low body temperature. 

Symptoms of hypothermia may include: 

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion or feeling very tired
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

Watch for sign of frostbite or hypothermia - if you begin to experience symptoms, call 911 or UMPD (413-545-3111) immediately for emergency medical attention.

More information about the health risks associated with hypothermia, visit the CDC.

Be prepared for the cold:

  • Avoid the outdoors, if possible
    • If you must go outside, try to limit your time and seek out a warm place for breaks.
  • Drink plenty of fluids, such as water or lukewarm beverages. Avoid alcohol and sugary drinks.
  • Dress for the weather:
    • Wear several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing.
      • Cover your hand - mittens are warmer than gloves.
      • Wear a hat to prevent loss of body heat.
      • Cover your next and mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.
    • Avoid wet clothing

The National Weather Service provides a Wind Chill Chart as a metric to monitor personal safety in cold conditions: