Subject Matter Requirements

Faculty addressing group of student teachers in hallway

As noted in the secondary education program descriptions, individuals interested in enrolling in any of our secondary education programs should have an undergraduate degree in the subject they wish to teach.  Majoring or having a degree in the intended licensure area satisfies many of the necessary subject matter requirements in that area.  However, there may be additional course requirements not satisfied by the major or degree.  Students must meet with their major advisor and/or below subject matter advisors to devise an individual plan of study to meet these additional requirements.  If candidates do not have a degree in the subject they wish to teach, they will have to fulfill the subject matter requirements by taking additional undergraduate coursework before entering an initial licensure program.

Below are links to the subject matter requirements for each licensure area, along with contact information for each of the subject matter advisors. If you would like your transcript(s) reviewed to see what subject matter requirements you may still need to fulfill, please contact the appropriate subject matter advisor to set up an appointment.

English

Advisors:

Meg Gebhard
W212, Furcolo Hall
(413) 577-0863

Keisha Green 
W210, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-1118

English Education Competency Area Required Credits A partial list of courses at UMass Amherst which meet subject matter requirements
American Literature 6
  • ENG 268: American Lit and Culture pre-1865
  • ENG 269: American Lit and Cult post-1865
  • ENG 271: Early American Lit
  • ENG 272: American Romanticism
  • ENG 273: American Realism
  • ENG 279: Intro to American Studies
English Literature 6
  • ENG 201: Early Brit. Lit and Cult.
  • ENG 202: Later Brit Lit. and Cult.
  • ENG 349: 19th C Brit Fiction
  • ENG 359: Victorian Imagination
  • ENG 469: Victorian Monstrosity
  • ENG 358: Romantic Poetry
Shakespeare 3
  • ENG 221: Shakespeare
  • ENG 222: Advanced Shakespeare
World Literature 6
  • ENG 205: Intro to Post-Co Studies
  • ENG 365: 20th C Lit of Ireland
Women in Literature 3
  • ENG 378: American Women Writers
  • AFROAM 391B: S-Modern Afro-American Women Novelists
  • AFROAM 297F: ST-Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean
Literature by Authors of Color 3
  • ENG 204: Intro to Asian Am. Lit
  • ENG 205: Intro to Post-Co Studies
  • ENG 371: Af. Am. Lit
  • AFROAM 244: Afro-American Poetry: Beginning to 1900
  • AFROAM 253: Pre-Civil War Black Writers
Poetry 3
  • ENG 375: American Poetry
  • ENG 366: Modern Poetry
  • ENG 358: Romantic Poetry
  • ENG 343: English Epic Tradition
Narrative 3
  • ENG 200: Intensive Seminar in Literary Studies (many other options here)
Literary Criticism 3
  • ENG 374: 20th Century American Lit
  • ENG 375: American Poetry
  • ENG 376: American Fiction
  • ENG 372: Caribbean Lit
  • ENG 373: American Indian Lit
Print and Non-print Media 3
  • EDUC 167: Education and film
  • ENG 302: Studies in Textuality and New Media
  • ENG 391D: Writing and Emerging Technologies
  • ENG 290 BH: Intro to Performance Studies
  • COMM121: Introduction to Media & Culture
History of English Language 3
  • ENG 412: History of the English Language
  • ENG 313: Intro to Old English
  • ENG 416: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales
  • ENG 505: Beowulf
Theories of Langauge 3
  • LING190A: Language Acquisition & Human Nature
  • LING 201: Introduction to Linguistic Theory
  • EDUC 503: Sheltered English Immersion
Rhetoric 3
  • ENG 388: Rhetoric, Writing, and Society
  • EDUC 503: Sheltered English Immersion 
Reading 3
  • EDUC693T: Adolescent Literature
Writing and Evaluating Writing 3
  • ENG 300: Junior Year Writing
  • ENG 329: Tutoring Writing: Theory and Practice
  • ENG 254: Intro to Creative Writing
  • ENG 354: Creative Writing
  • ENG 355: Creative Writing: Fiction
  • ENG 356: Creative Writing Poetry
  • EDUC 503: Sheltered English Immersion

 

Spanish

Please see the below subject matter advisor for subject matter requirements

Carole Cloutier
Room 408, Herter Hall
(413) 545-4916
cloutier@spanport.umass.edu

Mathematics

Advisors

John Francisco
W242, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-0615

Sandra Madden
W249, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-0135

Guidelines for Students Seeking Licensure in High School Mathematics

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge Requirements for Mathematics (Grade Level: 8-12)

  1. Algebra

  2. Euclidean Geometry

  3. Trigonometry

  4. Discrete/Finite mathematics

  5. Introductory calculus through integration

  6. History of mathematics

  7. Use of technology

  8. Abstract algebra

  9. Number theory

  10. Calculus through differential equations

  11. Probability and statistics

  12. Non-Euclidean and transformational geometries

  13. Applied mathematics or mathematics modeling

Subject matter knowledge in Mathematics at the 8-12 level for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in mathematics at the 8-12 level. Normally the course work requirements can be met with a major in mathematics. Often candidates must take additional courses to fulfill requirements (f), and (g). 

History

Advisors

History Department Director of Undergraduate Studies
Professor Anne Broadbridge
611 Herter Hall
(413) 545-6757

College of Education Secondary Teacher Education Program Coordinator: History
Robert W. Maloy
110 Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-0945
rwm@educ.umass.edu.

You may also contact the Educator Information Office for a preliminary advising appointment: eio@educ.umass.edu or (413) 545-2002. 

Subject Matter Requirement Credits

Suggested UMass courses to fulfill requirement 

Non-Western Area Studies 

Two 3-credit courses
  • HIST 110 Problems of World Civilization before 1500 *
  • HIST 111 World History II*
  • HIST 114 History of Chinese Civilization: Ancient Origins to the End of the Mongol Era
  • HIST 115 History of Chinese Civilization: Early Modern to the Present 
  • HIST 116 History of East Asian Civilization: Japan
  • HIST 120 Latin American Civilization: The Colonial Period
  • HIST 121 Latin American Civilization: The National Period
  • HIST 130 Middle Eastern History I
  • HIST 131 Middle Eastern History II
  • HIST 160 History of Africa to 1500
  • HIST 161 History of Africa since 1500**
  • Any upper level or graduate non-Western area studies course

(Also consult the 390 and 600 series of Special Topics courses and the 490 and 700 series of Seminars.)

*All University of Massachusetts History majors are strongly recommended to take History 110 and History 111
**All University of Massachusetts History majors must take at least two courses (100-level or upper level, in any combination) to be selected from the following areas: Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, World.) 

 

European History Two 3-credit courses
  • HIST 100 Western Thought to 1600 (or HIST 102H same, Honors)
  • HIST 101 Western Thought since 1600 (or HIST 103H same, Honors)
  • HIST 140 European History, 1500-1815 (or HIST 142H same, Honors)
  • HIST 141 European History, 1815 to Present (or HIST 143H same, Honors)
  • Any upper level or graduate European history course

(Also consult the 390 and 600 series of Special Topics courses and the 490 and 700 series of Seminars.) 

Pre-1500 History One 3-credit course
  • HIST 100 Western Thought to 1600 (or 102H Honors equivalent)
  • HIST 110 Problems in World Civilization I
  • HIST 112 Intro to World Religions
  • HIST 114 History of Chinese Civilization: Ancient Origins to the End of the Mongol Era
  • HIST 130 Middle Eastern History I
  • HIST 160 History of Africa to 1500
  • HIST 180 Western Science and Technology I: From the Greeks to the Scientific Revolution
  • HIST 300 Ancient Greece
  • HIST 301 The Roman Republic
  • HIST 302 Early Middle Ages
  • HIST 303 Later Middle Ages
  • HIST 304 Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance, 1300-1494
  • HIST 425 History of Christianity
  • Any graduate pre-1500 history course

(Also consult the 200, 300 and 600 series of Special Topics courses and the 400 and 700 series of Seminars.)

*All University of Massachusetts History majors must take one of the above courses or the equivalent. The list of appropriate pre-1500 history courses is updated each semester by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

United States History Two 3-credit courses
  • HIST 150 Development of American Civilization to 1876 (or HIST 152H same, Honors)
  • HIST 151 Development of American Civilization since 1876 (or HIST 153H same, Honors)
  • HIST 154 Social Change and the 1960s
  • HIST 388 U. S. Women’s History to 1890
  • HIST 389 U. S. Women’s History since 1890
  • Any other upper level or graduate United States history courses
  • AFRO-AM 132 Afro-American History, 1619-1860
  • AFRO-AM 133 Afro-American History, Civil War to 1954

(Also consult the 200, 300 and 600 series of Special Topics courses and the 400 and 700 series of seminars.) 

Methods of Historical Research One 3-credit course

Each semester a variety of courses are offered that involve research and writing. These pro-seminars are numbered from 591 to 595. Any one of these will meet this requirement.* 

* All University of Massachusetts History majors must take one of these pro-seminars. The pro-seminar fulfills the junior year writing requirement. 

Electives in History Four-Six 3-credit courses In consultation with advisor 

French and Italian

Please see the below subject matter advisor for subject matter requirements 
Rhonda Tarr
Room 313, Herter Hall
(413) 545-6711 or rtarr@frital.umass.edu

Chinese

Please see the below subject matter advisor for subject matter requirements
Zhijun Wang
Room 337, Herter Hall
(413) 545-4946 or zhijunw@asianlan.umass.edu

General Science

Advisor

John Kudukey
Room W248, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-3126

Guidelines for Students Seeking Initial Licensure in General Science

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge for General Science (Grade Level: 5-8)

(a) Intermediate knowledge of biology, chemistry, physics, earth/space science, and related mathematics

(b) History and philosophy of science

(c) Methods of research in the sciences, including laboratory techniques and the use of computers

Subject matter knowledge in General Science for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in General Science. Normally the course work requirement can be met with a distribution of courses in all four sciences and an equivalent of at least a minor in one. Often candidates must take additional course work to fulfill requirement (b). 

Biology

Advisor

John Kudukey
Room W248, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-3126

Guidelines for Students Seeking Initial Licensure in High School Biology

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge for Biology (Grade Level: 8-12)

(a)  Biology of organisms, especially that of humans, including characteristics and classifications of organisms

(b)  Cells and cell theory

(c)  Ecology and evolutionary biology

(d)  Matter and energy in ecosystems

(e)  Genetics, including chromosome structure and function and inheritance.

(f)  Molecular biology

(g)  Related aspects of chemistry, physics, earth science, and mathematics, such as statistics

(h)  Engineering and technical applications of biology

(i)  History and philosophy of science

(j) Methods of research in the sciences, including laboratory techniques and the use of computers

 

Subject matter knowledge in Biology for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in biology. Normally the course work requirement can be met with a major in biology. Often candidates must take additional course work to fulfill requirements (h) and (i). 

Chemistry

Advisor

John Kudukey
Room W248, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-3126

Guidelines for Students Seeking Licensure in High School Chemistry 

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge Requirements for Chemistry (Grade Level: 8-12)

(a)  Inorganic chemistry

(b)  Organic chemistry

(c)  Analytical chemistry

(d)  Physical chemistry

(e)  Biochemistry

(f)  Related aspects of biology, physics, earth science, and mathematics, such as statistics and calculus

(g)  Engineering and technical applications of chemistry

(h)  History and philosophy of science

(i)  Methods of research in the sciences, including laboratory techniques and the use of computers

Subject matter knowledge in Chemistry for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in Chemistry. Normally the course work requirements can be met with a major in Chemistry. Often candidates must take additional courses to fulfill requirements (g), (h) and (i). 

Earth Science

Advisor

John Kudukey
Room W248, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-3126

Guidelines for Students Seeking Initial Licensure in Earth Science

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge for Earth Science (Grade Level: 5-12)

(a) Geology
(b) Oceanography
(c) Astronomy
(d) Environmental biology, physics, and chemistry
(e) Meteorology
(f) Related aspects of chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics
(g) Engineering and technical applications of earth science
(h) History and philosophy of science
(i) Methods of research in the sciences, including laboratory techniques and the use of computers

Subject matter knowledge in Earth Science for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in Earth Science. Normally the course work requirement can be met with a major in Earth Science or Earth Systems. Often candidates must take additional course work to fulfill requirements (g) and (h). 

Physics

Advisor

John Kudukey
Room W248, Furcolo Hall
(413) 545-3126

Guidelines for Students Seeking Licensure in High School Physics

Massachusetts Subject Matter Knowledge Requirements for Physics

(Grade Level: 8-12)

(a) Mechanics (including fluid mechanics) (b) Heat, heat transfer, and thermodynamics (c) Kinetic theory of gases
(d) Light and geometric optics

(e) Electricity and magnetism
(f) Waves (sound and light)
(g) The atom: its structure and the nucleus (including nuclear reactions)
(h) Quantum theory of the atom
(i) Quantum theory of light
(j) Engineering and technical application of physics
(k) Related aspects of biology, chemistry, earth science and mathematics, such as trigonometry, vector analysis, and calculus
(l) History and philosophy of science
(m) Methods of research in the sciences, including laboratory techniques and the use of computers

Subject matter knowledge in Physics for Initial Licensure can be demonstrated by successful completion of appropriate course work and by passing the MTEL in physics. Normally the course work requirements can be met with a degree or major in Physics. Often candidates must take additional courses to fulfill requirements (k), (l) and (m).