Juliet Schor to deliver 2019 Samuel Bowles Lecture on November 20, 2019 4pm in Gordon Hall

Juliet SchorJuliet Schor, professor of sociology at Boston College, will deliver the 2019 Samuel Bowles lecture on November 20th. Schor's talk is titled 'It's Beyond the Gig: Work and the Platform Economy.'

 Schor is also a member of the MacArthur Foundation Connected Learning Research Network. Schor’s research focuses on consumption, time use, and environmental sustainability. 

Léonce Ndikumana discusses his work shaping global policy with 'Times Higher Education'

Anti-corruption economist Léonce Ndikumana discusses his humble upbringing in Burundi, his five months in solitary confinement, and how his work is shaping global policy.

"In 1988, there was a protest where the local community demanded some changes, and the government sent in troops to quell the revolt, and they began killing people from my ethnic group, the Hutu," said Ndikumana. "At that time I was teaching at the University of Burundi as a junior lecturer, and we wrote open letters to the president to try to stop these indiscriminate killings. We were arrested and spent five months in solitary confinement."

Arindrajit Dube's report on the effects of minimum wages released by the UK Government

Arin DubeProfessor Arindrajit Dube’s report on the effects of minimum wages and the impact of the National Living Wage (NLW) in the UK has just been released by the UK Government. The report finds that “overall the most up to date body of research from US, UK and other developed countries points to a very muted effect of minimum wages on employment, while significantly increasing the earnings of low paid workers.” Read the full report here.

 

 

UMass Economics in the News

“An economist’s guide” to watching tonight’s Democratic presidential debate mentions Gerald Friedman, economics, who has estimated a full-scale single-payer health care system would cost as much as $40 trillion over a decade. (The Conversation, 11/20/19)

Gerald Friedman, economics, writes that making Medicare available to people of all ages is a simpler and less costly path to solving America’s health care problem than the solutions proposed by most presidential candidates. Medicare is currently only available to individuals age 65 and over. (The Good Men Project, 11/13/19)