Combating Polarization: A Symposium on Obstacles to Community

October 31, 2019, 10:00-2:00 PM, Campus Center Auditorium

 

The 2nd annual symposium on polarization will focus on ways to combat division, better understand who we are as a community, and how we can develop a greater ability to engage across divides. Speakers include award winning journalist and author Colin Woodard and Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies Sara Konrath. A lightning talk session over lunch will provide an overview of programs, initiatives, and opportunities on campus geared towards building community. The Office of Equity and inclusion, Building Bridges and the Partnership for Worker Education, the International Programs Office, Student Activities and Campus Life, and various affiliates will present.

 

Register to attend

 

10:00 AM: Award winning journalist and author, Colin Woodard, will speak about topics in his book American Nations. Woodard describes how divisions in the United States today are rooted in the settlement patterns of early America. According to Woodard, at least 11 different regional traditions continue to shape the country's culture and politics. He shows how the regions' struggle to reconcile individual liberty and the common good have led to both greatness and disaster. 

 

11:15am-1:00pm: Lunch break and a "lightning talk" session that will provide an overview of programs, initiatives, and opportunities on campus geared towards building community. The Office of Equity and inclusion, Building Bridges and the Partnership for Worker Education, the International Programs Office, Student Activities and Campus Life, and various affiliates will present.

 

1:00pm: Sara Konrath will close the event with her talk Civil Conversations in a Time of Rising Polarization. Konrath is an Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and is the director of the Interdisciplinary Program on Empathy and Altruism Research (iPEAR). iPear is a research lab with a primary focus on motivations, traits, and behaviors relevant to philanthropic giving, volunteering, and other prosocial behaviors.