Student Care Supply Closets

Student Affairs and Campus Life manages the Student Care Supply Closets which provide free toiletries and household items to students who are facing economic insecurity and/or an unexpected financial emergency. 
 

How it Works

Current students: stop by any of our Student Care Supply Closet locations, complete a shopping sheet, and pick up your items within 1 business day! For tips and more support resources, check out Single Stop.

Supply Closets Locations 

Get Involved

 

Supply Closet Items

  • Baby Wipes 
  • Band-Aids 
  • Bar Soap*
  • Body Lotion*   
  • Body Wash*
  • Dental Floss
  • Deodorant*
  • Diaper Rash Cream  
  • Dish Soap and Sponges
  • Disinfecting Wipes   
  • Facial Tissue
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Hand Soap*
  • Lip Balm 
  • Pads & Tampons 
  • Paper Towels (Single Roll)
  • Shampoo & Conditioner*  
  • Shaving Cream/Gel  
  • Toilet Paper  
  • Toothbrush & Toothpaste   

*Unscented, sensitive skin, and products with Shea butter are needed.
Suggested Brands: Jergens, Pantene, Dove, Suave, Shea Moisture, Carol’s Daughter
**Please note, razors or mouthwash will not be accepted.


About the Program
 

Food insecurity—the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods—is a growing issue impacting college students across the country.[1] Between 20-30% of UMass Amherst students reported struggling with food insecurity (Clark & Harris, 2015). Access to toiletries and household items encourages students to reallocate limited resources toward groceries and other basic needs.
 

Starting in 2017, the Dean of Students Office has partnered with Campus Compact for Southern New England and hosts a national service volunteer to support the coordination of campus-wide efforts to promote basic needs security. 

 

Learn More

  • Connect with other promoting food security at UMass Amherst.
  • Visit the CCSNE Campus Food Security resource page to check out what other campuses are doing.

 

[1] http://wihopelab.com/publications/Wisconsin-HOPE-Lab-Still-Hungry-and-Homeless.pdf