Haivan Hoang on Power and Difference

Faculty Voices Videos:  Haivan Hoang - English

Haivan Hoang on Power and Difference

"I take a student-centered viewpoint, really trying to affirm what students bring to the class. And with that there is definitely, for me, a consideration of power relations—socially among students and of course between instructor and students." –Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang:  Writing as Practice & Subject

"Even though writing is typically the focus of my classes, readings are also very important to me because I want to introduce students to really diverse perspectives through readings that would exceed what they would get from their peers." –Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang: Assessment & Feedback through Dialogue

"Dialogue with students…is so important because it is a way of modeling how writing should be read. I think most students are coming from a culture of testing and exams and writing is about performance, so it is not uncommon for students to ask, ‘What do you want me to write? How do you want me to write this?’ I really want them to back up and think about writing as communication.–Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang: Negotiating Authority in the Classroom

"Early on in my teaching career I felt like I needed to own my authority, when was in my early 20s teaching English courses as an Asian American who doesn’t have a very forceful kind of presence. I felt like I needed to go in and basically say what my credentials were, to say what my research interests were." –Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang: Productive Discomfort in the Classroom

"…and he realized that he had more commonality there than he thought. I said, ‘This essay is intentionally confrontational. Why do you think she might have written it in this way?’" –Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang in Depth: Race in the Classroom

"I’ve had [white] students who’ve told me that they grew up being told that they shouldn’t even mention race…. from really well-meaning people. …And that’s the way to work toward equality. …I think that kind of talk stymied their curiosity about why we have the kind of race relations we have now in the United States.–Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English

 

Haivan Hoang: Valuing Nontraditional Student Knowledge

"We talked about what he brought to the class. He was a spirited 18 year old who was excited about maybe some things that were getting him into trouble but also excited about being in college and doing something with his life." –Dr. Haivan Hoang, Associate Professor, English