Diversity Lunch & Learn

"Engaging Students and Reducing Resistance in the Diversity Classroom" with Karen Suyemoto    

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Join Karen Suyemoto, Professor of Psychology, Asian American Studies and Critical Ethnic and Community Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, for this interactive workshop in which she will discuss how resistance is enacted, reframe resistance as part of an educational change process, and discuss proactive and reactive strategies that you can implement for addressing resistance and engaging students in your classes.

Whether evidenced by silence, denial, disconnection, or rage, resistance has the power to thwart learning and derail discussion in courses addressing race, culture, and other systems of power and privilege. This workshop aims to explore manifestations of resistance and share strategies for more effective teaching. We will examine how resistance is enacted, reframe resistance as part of an educational change process, and discuss proactive and reactive strategies for addressing resistance and engaging students.
   
Session Goals
Participating in this workshop will allow you to:
   (1) Identify ways that resistance develops and is enacted in students with dominant and minority statuses, with attention to multicultural models of identity, racism, and prejudice creation and reduction.
   (2) Describe foundational curricular and pedagogical/praxis strategies for addressing resistance.
   
The Diversity Lunch & Learn sessions are open to any instructor on our campus (full- and part-time faculty, post-docs, graduate teaching assistants). They are part of CTL’s Teaching & Diversity Professional Development series . For more information, contact Kirsten Helmer  or see the Diversity Lunch & Learn  page.
   
Presenter Information:
Karen L. Suyemoto, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology, Asian American Studies and Critical Ethnic and Community Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Her teaching, research, and consultations focus on three interrelated areas: (a) understanding the effects of race and racism on mental health and identity, (2) examining the effects of participating in activism and resistance, and (3) how cultural responsiveness and racial social justice can be developed through and integrated into education and psychological practice, training, and research. Current research projects include a 2 book project focused on teaching and learning about race, oppression, privilege, and intersectional statuses, and a quantitative survey project examining how resisting or challenging racism personally or systemically may moderate the negative psychological effects of experiencing racism for people of color. Previous work has focused on inter-minority race relations, ally and advocacy development, teaching for transformation and social justice, and training psychologists for cultural responsivity and racial equity. Dr. Suyemoto has served as the Co-Director of the New England Center for Inclusive Teaching and the President of the Asian American Psychological Association [AAPA]. In 2013, she was recognized as a White House Champion of Change: Asian American Pacific Islander Women and also received the AAPA’s Distinguished Contributions Award. She is the Chair of the APA Task Force for the recently accepted Guidelines for Race and Ethnicity in Psychology. 

Event date: 

Monday, November 04, 2019 -
1:15PM to 3:30PM

Event location: 

W.E.B. Du Bois Library, Rm 2601