People

Ying Li

MA/PhD

email: yingl@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Chinese minority, Heritage, Museum, Tourism; Chinese Migrants

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

M.A. Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst 2015

 

Biography and Research Interests

I got my bachelor's degree in China on Archaeology and my Master degree on Museum Studies in Peking University in Beijing, China. In 2015, I got another Master degree of Anthropology from University of Massachusetts Amherst. Now I'm doing my PhD study on Chinese minority people, heritage, tourism and museum.

 

Whitney Battle-Baptiste

Associate Professor

I see myself as a scholar and activist who views the classroom and the university as a space to engage contemporary issues with a sensibility of the past. My academic training is in history and historical archaeology and my research is primarily focused on how the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality look through an archaeological lens.  My work has included interpreting captive African domestic spaces at Andrew Jackson's Hermitage Plantation, school segregation in 19th century Boston at the Abiel Smith School on Beacon Hill, the Burghardt family homestead, also known as the W. E. B. Du Bois Homesite in Great Barrington, Mass., and my most recent work on the complexities of navigating a community-based archaeological project at the Millars Plantation site on the Bahamian island of Eleuthera. My first book, Black Feminist Archaeology (Left Coast Press, 2011), outlines the basic tenets of Black feminist thought and research for archaeologists and shows how it can be used to improve contemporary historical archaeology as a whole. I am also serving as the Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Center at UMass Amherst.

Twitter @blackfemarch

African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter: http://scholarworks.umass.edu/adan/

UMass Amherst Blog: http://works.bepress.com/whitney_battle_baptiste/

  Curriculum Vitae

Virginia "Jena" McLaurin

PhD 

email: vmclauri@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Indigenous film, digital media, Indigenous identities, stereotypes

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.S., Anthropology, Emory University 2010

MA, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2012

 

Advisor(s)

Jean Forward

 

Victoria Bochniak

PhD

Interest: indigenous archaeology, ethnography, historical archaeology, heritage education, public archaeology and outreach, ethnography of archaeology, the examination of transitional sites for North American Tribes during the early reservation period

Degrees Earned:

M.A. Anthropology, University of Idaho

B.S. Anthropology, Montana State University

Advisor:

Sonya Atalay

Bio:
Victoria is a PhD student in anthropology. Her professional and academic training so far has focused on public archaeology and ethnography. She enjoys working on archaeological excavations where she can train volunteers to participate in the excavation. Victoria is also committed to conducting responsible research in collaboration with Indigenous communities. Her master’s thesis was completed in collaboration with the Crow Tribe in Montana. She conducted a reanalysis of two archaeological collections from a sacred site on the Crow Reservation through oral histories she recorded with Crow Elders. Victoria’s dissertation will involve the archaeological analysis of a historical site, as well as ethnographic research with the Crow Tribe.

Ventura Pérez

Associate Professor, Graduate Admission Director
Editor-in-Chief Landscapes of Violence
Bio-archaeology: My primary area of interest is interpersonal and institutional forms of violence.  My work focuses on cultural representations of violence using an interdisciplinary inquiry that includes social science and behavioral and biological research (specifically skeletal trauma), along with the analysis of artifacts and ethnohistoric research.  I view the use of violence as a cultural performance and argue that in order to understand its use we must strive to recognize the culturally specific circumstances under which it is produced and maintained.  My other interests include skeletal biology, taphonomy, forensic anthropology, paleopathology, and the etiology of diseases affecting the human skeleton. My research is currently in Zacatecas, Mexico at the site of La Quemada (AD 900) and in the greater Southwest.
Violence & Conflict Research Lab

Vanesa Giraldo

PhD

email: vgiraldo@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-36

CV:

 

Interests

My work focuses on reproductive politics debates in contexts of war and post-conflict. For my dissertation, I am studying how reproductive experiences of ex-combatant women of the Colombian armed conflict have been restrained and influenced by the government, armed groups, and women's movements against war. I have also conducted research on experiences of mental illness among children, social determinants of infectious diseases, and social movements in health.
 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, Universidad Nacional de Columbia, Bogota, 2009

M.S., Public Health, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, 2012

Publications

Books

Giraldo V and Reyes G. Conocimiento para la innovación. Sociedad Colombiana de Anestesiología. ISBN 978-958-8873-28-2

Book chapters

2013 Giraldo, V. De Angustias y Ansiedades Infantiles (Child Anguishes and Anxieties). In: Health, Normalization, and Capitalism in Colombia. Medical Anthropology. Pp. 10-22. Abadía, C; Góngora. A; Melo; M; Platarrueda, C, (eds). Colección CES.

Articles

2016 Giraldo V, Muñoz C, Buitrago MT, Abadia C. Interactions between home care and hospital care during pregnancy and postpartum among low-    income women in a maternity clinic in Cartagena, Colombia. In: Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology. Vol. 44. Num. 2

2015 Amaya-Ariasa AM, Idarraga D; Giraldo V and Gómez LM. Effectiveness of a program for improving teamwork in Operating Rooms. In: Revista Colombiana de Anestesiología. Vol. 43 pp. 68-75. Co-author

2012 Abadia C, Oviedo DG, Giraldo V and Muñoz C. Salud al derecho. Una Experiencia de exigibilidad de derechos. (Health as a Right: An      Experience of Rights Fight) In: Revista Convergência Crítica. No. 12 pp. 252-275. Co-author

2012 Giraldo V. La voz del paciente en el encuentro con el profesional de salud.       (Patient’s voice in the encounter with health providers). In: Revista Médico Legal. (18) 2 pp. 36-39

2012 Giraldo V, De fríos y calores maternales. (Maternal colds and heats) In: Documentos de Trabajo #20. CLACSO.

2010 Fernandez J, Idrovo J, Giraldo V. Determinantes sociales de la Malaria. ¿aportes de la Medicina Social Latinoamericana? (Social determinants of Malaria. What are the contributions of Latin-American Social Medicine?. In:BIOMEDICA. (30) 3.

2009 Cañon O, Bueno J, Giraldo V, Oviedo D. Summary. Design and testing of an indicator (Financial Bias Indicator - FBI)) that estimates the influence of funding in the results (Financing Bias - FB)) of Economic Evaluations of Health   Technologies (EEHT). In: Value in Health. (12) 5 pp. A25. Co-author

Thomas Leatherman

Tabitha Dorshorst

MA/PhD

email: tdorshorst@umass.edu

Machmer W-14

 

Interests

Biological anthropology, skeletal morphology, physical activity levels, and bone health

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.S., Anthropology & Kinesiology with a healthcare emphasis and minor in Neuroscience, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh 2017

Steven King

Lecturer
I am a biological anthropologist broadly interested in ontogeny and the evolved life history strategies of primates, particularly Malagasy lemurs, both living and extinct. My current research centers primarily on late ontogeny-on old age and senescence-in wild populations of nonhuman primates.

Stacey Matarazzo-Rine

Stacey is a part-time visiting lecturer for the Anthropology Department.

Soren Gigler

Sonya Atalay

Associate Professor
Machmer W20
satalay@umass.edu
Website
Twitter
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, 1991; M.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1998; Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley, 2003
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Indigenous archaeology and heritage, community-based research, indigenous theory and research methods, knowledge mobilization via comics animation & VR
 

Research Description:

My work is in engaged (public) anthropology, focused on research partnerships with indigenous and local communities. I work across the disciplinary boundaries of cultural anthropology, archaeology, heritage studies, and Native American & Indigenous studies. For me, research is at its best when everyday people are engaged in studying, protecting and teaching about their own cultural heritage. I am working to understand and bring about the institutional changes required to support engaged, activist, and transformative scholarships through ethics principles, grant agency frameworks, tenure promotion guidelines, etc.


Key Publications:

2012 Community-Based Archaeology: Research with, by and for Indigenous and Local Communities, University of California Press

 

Shelley Silva

Program Coordinator
213 Machmer Hall

Acts as the point person for academic programs and works with the Graduate Program Director, Admissions Director, Undergraduate Program Director, Chief Undergraduate Advisor and acts as Scheduling and Curriculum manager for the department. Works closely with the Department Chair to review and maintain the Master Calendar, website and list-serves as well as assists students with general department program information and needs. 


Education: 

A.S. Computer Information Systems-Office Management, GCC
Certificate: General Office Administration, GCC

 

Professional Experience: 

Program Coordinator, Anthropology Dept.  UMass-Amherst, 2000-Present
Space Management Assistant, UMass-Amherst, 1998-2000
Customer Service Representative, Lunt Silversmith, Couzon, USA, 1996-1998
Academic Assistant, Continuing Education, UMass-Amherst, 1991-1996
 

 

 

 

Seung ho Chung

PhD

email: seungho@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Anthropology of aging, Political economy of Eldercaare Industry, Social Construction of aging, Value theory, Epistemologies of Ethnography, Political Anthropology, Political Behavior, American Politics, History and Theories of Anthropology

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Advisor(s)

Amanda Walker Johnson

Seda Saluk

PhD

email: ssaluk@anthro.umass.edu

Bartlett 102

 

 

Interests

political anthropology; medical anthropology; ethnography of the state and health care; feminist studies of science, technology, and medicine; governmentality, and late capitalism; Turkey, Europe, and the Middle East

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Psychology, Bogazici University, 2008

M.A., Gender Studies, Central European University, 2009

 

Advisor(s)

Jacqueline Urla, Julie Hemment, and Laura Briggs

 

Biography and Research Interests

Seda Saluk is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and holds a Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies from the Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies. Her dissertation project examines the material, subjective, and relational worlds of women in Turkey’s reproductive health care system in the midst of pronatalist state policies and global push towards health statistics. She focuses on health information technologies used in hospitals and clinics as emergent forms of reproductive governance, and how different women participate in, experience, and negotiate these technologies along the axes of gender, class, and race/ethnicity.

 

Sarah Reedy

Lecturer
Office Hours: MW 10:00am -12:00pm
Thompson 26

Ryan Rybka

MA/PhD

email: rrybka@umass.edu
 

Interests

Indigenous Archaeology; Historical Archaeology; Ethnography; Corporate Anthropology; Decolonization
 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. Earth Sciences, University of Maine, 2015

B.A. Anthropology, University of Maine, 2015
 

Advisor(s)

Sonya Atalay
 

Biography and Research Interests

I am interested in the contestations surrounding resource extracting corporate infringements on Indigenous land.

 

Roman Sanchez

MFA (Creative Writing), PhD

email: rcsanchez@umass.edu

DuBois Library, 12th Floor, Rm 32

 

 

Interests

Latinx Writers and Artists; Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Writing; Decolonial and Settler Colonial Studies; Posthumanism, the Anthropocene, and Education; Race and Ethnicity; Sensory and Experimental Visual Ethnography; Intermedia Art, Sculpture, and Installation; Community-Based Participatory Action Research; Arts-Practice Research Methods

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, University of Notre Dame, 2012

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, 2017

Advisor(s)

Amanda Walker Johnson and Krista Harper

 

Biography and Research Interests

My research focuses on arts higher education in the United States, as experienced by graduate students of color. As an artist and creative writer, I am interested in the creation of non-white spaces in graduate-level arts training (fine art, creative writing, dance, performance). I am also exploring the ways in which anthropological research practices might borrow from contemporary art practices to reach wider audiences, engage in community-based activist research, and open possibilities for scholar-artists of color to change neoliberal academia from the inside-out. 

 

Rebecca Bartusewich

PhD

email: rbartusewich@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E14

 

Interests

Mediterranean archaeology, Ceramic microstructural analysis, Identity in archaeology, anthropology of borders, Eastern European boundaries and issues of statehood

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, Classics/Art History, Virginia Tech 2005

MA, Ancient History, Macquarie University, 2007

MA, Archaeology and Ceramic Analysis, University of Southampton, 2009

 

Advisor(s)

Michael Sugerman

 

Biography and Research Interests

I am an archaeologist who researches social group identity in the Mediterranean region during the Iron Age. I am specifically interested in ceramic petrography and the way production styles relate to the separation of social groups. I work on the island of Cyprus, at the archaeological site of Idalion and currently am designated as associate director.

 

Publications

https://umass.academia.edu/RebeccaBartusewich

Rae Gould

Senior Lecturer / Tribal Liaison
Machmer 101 
Phone: (413) 545-2702
rgould@umass.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., Connecticut College, 1995; M.A., University of Connecticut, 2005; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 2010
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Cultural Heritage and Resources, Historic Preservation and Museum Collections; New England Native American history and culture in the Post-Contact centuries; Native American material culture and museum practices; Native American art and architecture in the Post-Contact centuries; Native American and Indigenous legal and sovereignty issues, including NAGPRA, Federal Acknowledgement, National Historic Preservation Act and Section 106 regulations
 

Research Description:

Dr. Rae Gould is a member of the Nipmuc Nation of Massachusetts and has worked on projects related to federal acknowledgement, Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and historic preservation over her 20-plus year career. She has held teaching positions at Connecticut College, UConn, UMass Amherst, American University and Catholic University, offering courses in Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, Human Rights, Heritage Studies and Native Studies. She also worked at the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in Washington, D.C., (2014-2017) and served as Repatriation Coordinator at UMass Amherst from 2010 to 2014.
 
Dr. Gould has also worked on archaeology, education and museum projects for audiences of all ages through her work with her tribe and at several museums in New England. Her publications include contributions to volumes on federal acknowledgement, NAGPRA, Indigenous archaeology, international cultural heritage issues, and Native American culture and history, and her PhD is from the University of Connecticut.


Key Publications:

2017 NAGPRA, CUI and Institutional Will. The Routledge Companion to Cultural Property. Haidy Geismar and Jane Anderson, eds. Routledge Press.

2013 Cultural Practice and Authenticity: The Search for Real Indians in New England in the “Historical” Period. The Death of “Prehistory.” Peter Schmidt and Stephen Mrozowski, eds. Oxford University Press.

2013 The Nipmuc Nation, Federal Acknowledgment, and a Case of Mistaken Identity, Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook. Jean O’Brien and Amy E. Den Ouden, eds. University of North Carolina Press.

2010 Indigenous Archaeology and Being Indian in New England, Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists, George Nicholas, ed. Left Coast Press.

Paulette Steeves

Dr. Paulette Steeves (Ph.D. SUNY Binghamton) will be joining us as a Visiting Lecturer for the Academic Year.  Dr. Steeves, who grew up in Lillooet, British Columbia, is a First Nations/ Native American, Cree- Metis descendant.  Dr. Steeves is an Indigenous archaeologist with a focus on the Pleistocene history of the Western Hemisphere (the Americas).  She has focused her research on decolonizing and rewriting Indigenous histories through indigenous method and theory. In her research Steeves argues that indigenous peoples were present in the Western Hemisphere as early as 60,000 years ago, and possibly much earlier. She has created a data base of hundreds of archaeology sites in both North and South America that date from 250,000 to 12,000 years before present.

Contact: (413) 577-3781
email: psteeves@anthro.umass.edu

Michael Sugerman

Senior Lecturer
I am an archaeologist interested in inter-cultural contact, exchange, and power relations in ancient complex societies. Throughout my career I have investigated Bronze and Iron Age economic structures in the Near East and the eastern Mediterranean through the use of stylistic, elemental, and microstructural studies of plain ceramics and other non-elite, Œordinary¹ goods. Over the course of the past fifteen years, I have carried out field research in many of the countries of the east Mediterranean littoral: Israel, Palestine, Egypt, Turkey, and Greece. At present I am beginning a project on Cyprus in which I will investigate archaeological markers of ethnic identity as well as the ways contemporary researchers assign ethnic identities and boundaries to the ancient populations of the island. I am also interested in the ways we can use ancient texts together with archaeological data to investigate ancient societies. In order to follow through on this interest I regularly teach classes in the departments of Classics and of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies here at UMass.
Website

Maxine Oland

Lecturer
moland@umass.edu
Website
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., State University of New York at Albany, 1999; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2009
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Culture contact and colonialism, household archaeology, historical archaeology of Latin America, Maya civilization, cultures and peoples of Mesoamerica, public archaeology
 

Research Description:

I am an anthropological archaeologist working in the postclassic and historic periods of Mesoamerica. I study the Maya people of Belize from the 15th through the 20th century, their interactions with European and other indigenous groups, and their eventual incorporation into the global economy. I am particularly interested in the intersection between the political economy of European colonization and the everyday life of Maya households.


Key Publications:

2017 Maxine Oland, "The Olive Jar in the Shrine: Situating Spanish Objects within a 15th-17th Century Maya Worldview," Foreign Objects: Rethinking Indigenous Consumption in American Archaeology, edited by Craig N. Cipolla, pp. 127-142. University of Arizona Press.

2016 Maxine Oland, "The 15th to 17th Centuries on Chetumal Bay," Perspectives on the Ancient Maya of Chetumal Bay, edited by Debra S. Walker, pp. 107-122. University Press of Florida.

2016 Maxine Oland and Joel Palka, "The Perduring Maya: New Archaeology of Early Colonial Transitions," Antiquity 90(350):472-486.

2014 Maxine Oland “'With the Gifts and Good Treatment that He Gave Them': Elite Maya Adoption of Spanish Material Culture at Progresso Lagoon, Belize. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 18(4):643-667.

2012 Maxine Oland, Siobhan M. Hart, and Liam Frink, eds. Decolonizing Indigenous Histories: Exploring Prehistoric/Colonial Transitions in Archaeology. University of Arizona Press.

2012 Maxine Oland Public and Postcolonial Practices in Latin American Archaeology: Engaging with Non-Descendant Communities in Northern Belize. Chungara 44(3):467-474.

Maxine Oland

Archaeology: culture contact and colonialism; household archaeology; historical political economy; historical archaeology of Latin America; Maya civilizations; cultures and peoples of Mesoamerica; archaeology of gender, public archaeology; decolonization of archaeological practice.

Marc Lorenc

PhD

email: mlorenc@anthro.umass.edu

 

Interests

Marc Lorenc is a doctoral student in Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, concentrating in Historical Archaeology of the African Diaspora in the Northeast. Using archaeology, Lorenc explores the connections between past and present inequality through a critical engagement with objects and how humans relate to them. He utilizes critical race theory and community based-participatory research as complimentary methods towards achieving social justice and meaningful change through archaeological research. Currently, he is the project director of the Dr. James Still Community Archaeology Project (DJSCAP) in Medford, NJ. His research specifically explores the materiality of meritocracy and how it shapes our understanding of the past and ourselves today.

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

MA, Anthropology, Monmouth College, 2013

Advisor(s)

Whitney Battle-Baptiste

 

Lynnette Leidy Sievert

Professor
Machmer 105 
leidy@anthro.umass.edu

Curriculum Vitae


Education:

B.S.N, Bloomsburg University, 1983; M.A., State University of New York at Albany, 1987; Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany, 1991
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Reproductive ecology, Human variation, Women's health
 

Research Description:

As a biological anthropologist I have focused on age at menopause and symptom experience at menopause as two aspects of human variation. I am also interested in the evolution of menopause and post-reproductive aging as a human trait. Fieldwork on the topic of menopause has taken me from western Massachusetts to Mexico, Slovenia, Paraguay, Hawaii, Bangladesh, and the UK.
 

Key Publications:

(2016) Sievert LL, Begum K, Sharmeen T, Murphy L, Whitcomb BW, Chowdhury O, Muttukrishna S, Bentley GR. Hot flash report and measurement among Bangladeshi migrants, their London neighbors, and their community of origin. Am J Physical Anthropology 161(4):620-633.

(2016) Begum K, Muttukrishna S, Sievert LL, Sharmeen T, Murphy L, Chowdhury O, Kasim A, Bentley GR. Ethnicity or environment: Effects of migration on ovarian reserve among Bangladeshi women in the United Kingdom. Fertility and Sterility 105(3):744-754.

(2014) Sievert LL. Anthropology and the study of menopause: evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives. Menopause 21(10):1151-1159.

(2011) Sievert LL. The evolution of post-reproductive life: adaptationist scenarios. In: Mascie-Taylor CGN, Rosetta L. (Eds.) Reproduction and Adaptation, Cambridge University Press, pp.149-170.

Liz Usherwood

MA/PhD

email: eusherwood@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E12

Office Hours: Mondays 2-3pm; Wednesdays 10-11am; by appointment

 

 

Interests

Heritage; historical archaeology; mental health and institutionalization; archaeology of institutional capacity; history and cultures of Florida and the US Southeast; race and racism; feminism; historic material culture

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, New College of Florida 2012

Advisor(s)

Elizabeth Chilton

 

Biography and Research Interests

I am a historical archaeologist with a focus on critical heritage research. My current research is on the heritage of institutional capacity, specifically focusing on mental hospitals and asylums in New England.

 

Publications

Elizabeth A. Usherwood Remembrance at the Belchertown State School: A Report from the Field. Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage 2(2): 154-159

 

Lindsay Meador

PhD (ABD)

email: lmeador@anthro.umass.edu

 

Interests

I'm interested in the paleobiology and ecology of the extinct lemurs of Madagascar.  My dissertation research has focused on interactions of animals within Quaternary paleocommunities in Madagascar, specifically by identifying modifications made by predators on the bones of extinct lemurs.
 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. Anthropology, Washington University St. Louis, 2005

M.A. Anthropology , University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2010

 

Advisor(s)

Laurie Godfrey

 

 

 

Linda Ziegenbein

Linda is a part-time lecturer for Anthropology.  She is an alum of the department earning her Ph.D in Historical Archaeology

Lauren Woodard

PhD

email: lwoodard@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-36

 

 

Interests

political anthropology, migration, nostalgia, national identity, anthropology of development, anthropology of post socialism, Russia, Central Asia

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, Russian Civilization, Smith College, 2011

MA, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, 2015

Advisor(s)

Julie Hemment

Biography and Research Interests

Cultural anthropologist, studying migration, nostalgia, and national identity in Russia and Central Asia.

 

Krista Harper

Professor
Machmer 214 
kharper@anthro.umass.edu
Website
Twitter
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1992; M.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1994; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1999
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Ethnographic, qualitative and participatory action research methods; applied anthropology and design ethnography; the anthropology of Europe; and urban mobilizations around the environment, food justice, and placemaking. Harper has conducted ethnographic research in Hungary, Portugal, and the United States.
 

Research Description:

Krista Harper is Professor of Anthropology and Public Policy. She is an expert in the anthropology of Europe; qualitative and participatory action research methods; and citizens’ mobilizations concerning the environment, food justice, and urban space. The recipient of two Fulbright scholarships, Harper has conducted long-term ethnographic field research in Hungary, Belgium, Portugal, and the United States, most recently investigating urban gardens, social cohesion, and economic crisis in Lisbon, Portugal. Harper is the PI (with Prof. Jacqueline Urla) of two three-year international research and training grants from the National Science Foundation for the “Culture and Heritage in European Societies and Spaces (CHESS)” program (NSF IIA 1261127 and NSF OISE-0986575, total funding $399,722). This initiative of the UMass European Field Studies program sponsors international research by students in partnership with the University of Barcelona and other universities, museums, and institutes in Europe. Prof. Harper has an ongoing research partnership with the University Libraries at UMass, combining design ethnography and research methods training for undergraduate and graduate students.


Key Publications:

2016 The Anthropology of Postindustrialism: Ethnographies of Disconnection. Ismael Vaccaro, Krista Harper, and D. Seth Murray, eds. New York: Routledge.

2015 Participatory Visual and Digital Research in Action. Aline Gubrium, Krista Harper, and Marty Otañez, eds. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast/Routledge.

2013 Participatory Visual and Digital Methods. Gubrium, Aline, and Krista Harper. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast/Routledge.

2006 Wild Capitalism: Environmental Activism and Postsocialist Political Ecology in Hungary. Boulder, CO and New York: East European Monographs/Columbia.

 

Kathleen Brown-Pérez

Assistant Professor
301 Commonwealth Honors College Building, 157 Commonwealth Ave.
brown-perez@honors.umass.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., Augustana College; M.B.A., The University of Iowa; J.D., The University of Iowa
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Federal Indian law and policy; tribal sovereignty; issues of colonization; Indigenous identity; federal acknowledgment of Indian tribes
 

Research Description:

Kathleen A. Brown-Perez is a faculty member in the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with an appointment in the Anthropology Department. In the Anthropology Department, she teaches the Senior Honors Thesis seminar “Conquest by Law: The Use of Law to Subjugate and Marginalize in the U.S.” In CHC, she teaches “Ideas the Change the World” and “Criminal Law and Justice.” She has a law degree and MBA from the University of Iowa and is licensed to practice in Arizona and Massachusetts. Previously a corporate attorney in Boston, Kathleen now limits her legal practice to consulting with law firms that are suing the federal government on behalf of tribes. A member of the Brothertown Indian Nation (Wisconsin), her research and publications focus on issues of federal Indian policy and law, including sovereignty, identity, and federal acknowledgment.


Key Publications:

2018 “‘An Inconvenient Truth’: The Use of Federal Policy to Erase American Indians, Indian Tribes, and Indigenous Heritage,” Heritage at the Interface: Interpretation and Identity. (ed. by Glenn Hooper). University of Florida Press.

2017 “Clearing the Landscape: The U.S. Government’s Ongoing Attempts to Remove Indigenous Peoples,” New Diversities, a special issue by guest editor Manuela Picq.

2013 “A Right Delayed: The Brothertown Indian Nation’s Story of Surviving the Federal Acknowledgment Process,” Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States: A Sourcebook. (ed. by Amy E. Den Ouden and Jean M. O’Brien). University of North Carolina Press.

2012 “‘A Reflection of Our National Character’: Structurally and Culturally Violent Federal Policies and the Elusive Quest for Federal Acknowledgment,” Landscapes of Violence.

 

Katherine Kirakosian

Katie Kirakosian (Ph.D. UMass Amherst) My research interests include Native archaeology in southern New England, especially the Woodland and Post-Contact period usage of marine shellfish by Native people throughout coastal Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. My dissertation focused on a history of shell midden archaeology, for which I conducted archival research throughout New England and New York state. Here I also conducted interviews with professional and avocational archaeologists to better understand the history and usage of the shell midden site type in New England.

Current projects on which I am working include research into the broader history of archaeology in Massachusetts, with a special focus on social networks; research on the importance of archival research by archaeologists; and a project on Native shell beads in southern New England both before and after European Contact. Since late 2016 I have also been involved in an oral history pilot project funded through the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) aimed at interviewing senior professional and avocational archaeologists.

A second strand of my research includes archaeology and pedagogy. I have presented for several years on this topic and in 2015, I became the founding co-chair of the Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) Teaching Archaeology’s Interest Group (TAIG). I am currently working on publications related to the ways in which experiential learning opportunities lead to deeper knowledge.

I have been a proud Executive Board member for the Tomaquag Museum in my home state of Rhode Island since 2014. I am also on the Editorial Board for the newly founded Journal of Archaeology and Education.

Link to my professional website: https://sites.google.com/site/katiekirakosian/

Kasey Jernigan

PhD

email: kjernigan@gmail.com

 

Interests

Critical biocultural anthropology; Native American and Indigenous health and well-being; political economy; food sovereignty; critical heritage studies; historical trauma; applied anthropology

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Spanish Language and Literature, Oklahoma State University 2001

MPH, Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 2005

Advisor(s)

Tom Leatherman, PhD, UMass Department of Anthropology

Jane Anderson, PhD, Department of Anthropology, New York University

Lisa Wexler, PhD, UMass School of Public Health and Health Sciences

 

Biography and Research Interests

Kasey Jernigan is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She earned her MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and completed the National Institutes of Health Native Researchers’ Certificate Program at Oregon Health & Sciences University. She is a National Academies Ford Foundation Fellow and a Native American Research Center for Health (NARCH) Fellow. Her research is focused on participatory action research with Indigenous communities for social justice and improved health outcomes, focusing on the historical and contemporary social determinants of health. Her dissertation research is examining the linkages between obesity, cultural identity, and food distribution programs among tribal communities in Oklahoma. She recently received a dissertation fellowship from the RIDGE Center for Targeted Studies, funded by the USDA, Economic Research Service.

 

Publications

Gubrium, AC, Fiddian-Green A., Jernigan, K., Krause, EL. (n.d.). Bodies as evidence: Mapping new terrain for teen pregnancy and parenting. Journal of Global Public Health, In review.

Jernigan K., Wexler L. (n.d.). The economics of culture: Investigating how material resources expand or limit Alaska Native young people's cultural identity narratives. Journal of Adolescent Research, In review. Leatherman T, Jernigan K. (2014). Introduction: Critical biocultural approaches to health disparities. Annals of Anthropological Practice, 38(2): 171-186.

Leatherman T, Jernigan K. (2014). The reproduction of poverty and poor health in spaces of vulnerability: A critical biocultural approach. Annals of Anthropological Practice, 38(2): 284-299.

Gubrium, AC, Krause, EL, Jernigan, K. (2014). Strategic authenticity and voice: New ways of seeing and being seen as a young mother through digital storytelling. Sexuality Research and Social Policy, 1-11.

Wexler L, Jernigan K, Mazziotti J, Baldwin E, Griffin M. (2014). Lived Challenges and Getting Through Them: Alaska Native Youth Narratives As a Way to Understand Resilience. Health Promotion Practice, 15(1): 10-7.

Lasch KE, Hassan M, Endicott J, Piault-Luis EC, Locklear J, Fitz-Randolph M, Pathak S, Hwang S, Jernigan K. (2012). Developmental and Content Validity of a Patient Reported Outcomes Measure to Assess Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder. BMC Psychiatry, 12(34).

Justin Helepololei

PhD 

email: jhelepololei@gmail.com

Machmer E34

 

Interests

Engaged ethnography, activism, social movements, security, direct action, critical pedagogy, jails, mass incarceration, rehabilitation and reentry programming, feminist ethnography, decolonization, political anthropology

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, Arizona State University 2010

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst 2014

 

Advisor(s)

Jacqueline Urla, Julie Hemment, Jen Sandler

 

Publications

2015 Helepololei, Justin. “A plurality of communisms.” Rethinking Marxism: A journal of economics, culture and society 27(3): 368-370.

2015 Helepololei, Justin. “Manual transmission: The do-it-yourself theory of Occupy Wall Street and Spain’s 15M” in Dissent and Social Movements, eds. Martin Bak Jørgensen and Óscar Garcia Agustín. Bern: Peter Lang.

2014 Urla, Jacqueline and Justin Helepololei. “The Ethnography of resistance then and now: On thickness and activist engagement in the twenty-first century.” History and Anthropology 25(4): 431-451.

Read more: https://preoccupiedethnography.noblogs.org

Julieta Chaparro-Buitrago

Interests: Decolonial feminisms, anthropology of reproduction, memory studies, human rights, engaged anthropology, Latin America, Peru.

 

Biography:

B.A., Anthropology, Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia 2005

M.A., Sociology, New School for Social Research, New York, 2009

 

I am a PhD candidate in the department of Anthropology and a student in the Advanced Graduate Certificate in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. My research looks at the intersections of memory, reproduction, and activism to understand how the cases of forced sterilizations in Peru. I study how this event has been simultaneously expelled, made illegible, and visibilized by different actors such as Women’s organizations, feminist activists, the Attorney General’s office and NGOs. Particularly, I look at how these different actors create the conditions of possibility for the different registers to be produced and map out the networks of knowledges and practices involved in these contradictory processes.

 

Advisor(s)

Jane Anderson, Thomas Leatherman, Laura Briggs, Jacqueline Urla

Julie Woods

PhD

email: woods@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E15 Lab

 

 

Interests

protocols; Indigenous Intellectual Property; ethical research methods; social-ecological systems; community-based climate change adaptation strategies

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.S. Computer Science Fitchburg State College

M.A. Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

 

Advisor(s)

Sonya Atalay

 

 

Julie Hemment

Professor

Cultural Anthropology: Post-socialism, gender and transition, feminist anthropology, Participatory Action Research Methodology, applied anthropology. Russia.

Jill Bierly

PhD

email: jbierly@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-14

Office Hours: TBA

 

 

Interests

anthropological archaeology, Heritage, Colonialism, Governmentality; Teaching, Archaeological Field Schools

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. Art History; Archaeology and Culture of the Ancient Near East, Lycoming College 2005

Advisor(s)

Michael Sugerman

Jen Sandler

Director, UMass Alliance for Community Transformation (UACT) and Lecturer

My research focuses on the knowledge practices of social change movements and coalitions. I have conducted ethnographic research in several U.S. cities as well as in Mexico with diverse activists, including community organizers, popular educators, policy activists, urban education activists, science advocates, and grant makers. I develop an understanding of activist coalitions by following the stories they tell about themselves and about their struggles, unfolding the layers of narrative and event that form the basis for collective epistemic identity and vision.  My own activism revolves around working with marginalized communities to build critical consciousness and political power to shape the institutions and policies that affect them. However, I find that great intellectual grist comes from engaging in ethnographic relationship with activists in different social positions and of wildly diverse political and ideological stripes. Other research interests include social theory, critical pedagogy, neoliberalism, immigration, sense of place/community, social movements, social policy, and meetings as research sites. 
UACT web site:  http://www.umass.edu/uact/

Jean Forward

Senior Lecturer

Cultural anthropological interests with a focus on colonialism, especially in North America and Scotland. I am also interested and active in environmental and human rights issues, especially Native American Indians, public education; community service and the teaching of history.

Jason Kamilar

Assistant Professor
Machmer 102 (office)
Machmer W16 (lab)
413-545-7397
jkamilar@anthro.umass.edu

Comparative Primatology Laboratory Website

Curriculum Vitae


Education:

B.A., Arizona State University, 1999; B.S. , Arizona State University, 1999; Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2006; Postdoctoral Fellowship, Washington University in St. Louis, 2009; Postdoctoral Researcher, Yale University, 2011
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Biological Anthropology: Primatology, behavior, ecology, evolution, biogeography, conservation biology, and quantitative methods. Locations of specialization: Africa and Madagascar.
 

Key Publications:

Kamilar JM and Tecot SR. 2016. Anthropogenic and climatic effects on the distribution of Eulemur species: An ecological niche modeling approach. International Journal of Primatology 37: 47-68.

Rowan J, Kamilar JM, Beaudrot L, Reed KE. 2016. Strong influence of paleoclimate on the structure of modern African mammal communities. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 283: 20161207.

Kamilar JM and Tecot SR. 2015. Connecting proximate mechanisms and evolutionary patterns: Pituitary gland size and mammalian life history. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 28: 1997-2008.

Kamilar JM and Atkinson QD. 2014. Cultural assemblages show nested structure in humans and chimpanzees but not orangutans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111: 111-115.

Kamilar JM and Baden AL. 2014. What drives flexibility in primate social organization? Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 68: 1677-1692.

Kamilar JM and *Beaudrot L. 2013. Understanding primate communities: Recent developments and future directions. Evolutionary Anthropology 22: 174-185.

Kamilar JM and Cooper N. 2013. Phylogenetic signal in primate behaviour, ecology, and life history. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 368: 20120341.

Hall, M.I., Kamilar, J.M., Kirk, E.C. 2012. Eye shape and the nocturnal bottleneck of mammals. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 279: 4962-4968.

Kamilar, J.M. and Bradley, B.J. 2011. Countershading is related to positional behavior in primates. Journal of Zoology 283: 227-233.

Kamilar, J.M. and Bradley, B.J. 2011. Interspecific variation in primate coat color supports Gloger’s rule. Journal of Biogeography 38: 2270–2277.

Kamilar, J.M., Bribiescas, R.G., Bradley, B.J. 2010. Is group size related to longevity in mammals? Biology Letters 6: 736-739.

Kamilar, J.M. and *Guidi, L.M. 2010. The phylogenetic structure of primate communities: Variation within and across continents. Journal of Biogeography 37: 801-813.

James Fisher

PhD

email: jafisher@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

 

Interests

Medical anthropology; political ecology; nutritional epidemiology; disease ecology and child health; food studies; conservation; Madagascar.

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, Anthropology, Hampshire College, 2009

MA, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2014

Advisor(s)

Tom Leatherman

 

Jackie Urla

Professor and Department Chair
Machmer 208 
jurla@anthro.umass.edu
Website
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1978; M.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1980; Ph.D.,University of California, Berkeley, 1987
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

cultural and linguistic anthropology
 

Research Description:

I'm a cultural anthropologist interested in the ethnography of resistance, gender and sexual politics, cultural activism, critical post-structuralism, technologies of knowledge and power, and minority languages. My research has been centered in Spain where I’ve done long term ethnographic research with Basque language advocates examining such issues as language standardization, youth community media projects, music and the political uses of statistics. I’m interested in theorizing the intersecting logics of nationalism, governmentality, and late capitalism. I continue to collaborate with Basque sociolinguists exploring the evolving politics of language revitalization and have begun new fieldwork on memories of violence of the Spanish civil war.


Key Publications:

Books

2012 Reclaiming Basque: Language, Nation and Cultural Activism. University of Nevada Press.

1995 Deviant Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Difference in Science and Popular Culture. J. Terry and J. Urla, eds. Race, Gender and Science Series. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Articles

In Press Urla, J. and C. Burdick. "Counting Matters: Measuring the Vitality of Basque." To appear in The Int. Jo. of the Sociology of Language, special issue: Lost in Counting: Language and Census. A. Duchene and P. Hubert, eds.

2018 Urla, J. et al. "Basque Standardization and the New Speaker: Political Praxis and the Shifting Dynamics of Authority and Value." P. Lane and J. Costa, eds. Standardizing Minority Languages: Competing Ideologies of Authority and Authenticity in the Global Periphery. Routledge Critical Studies in Multilingualism.

2016 Urla, J., E. Amorrortu, A. Ortega, and J. Goirigolzarri. "Authenticity and Linguistic Variety among New Speakers of Basque. Language Documentation and Conservation." Special Publication No. 9, Language Documentation and Conservation in Europe. Open access

2015 Ortega, A. J. Urla, E. Amorrortu, J. Goirigolzarri, and B. Uranga. “Linguistic Identity Among New Speakers of Basque.” Int. Jo. of the Sociology of Language 231:85-105

2014 Jacqueline Urla and Justin Helepololei. "The Ethnography of Resistance Then and Now: On Activist Engagements in the 21st Century." History and Anthropology 25 (4): 431-451.

2013 Altuna, Olatz and Jacqueline Urla. "The Basque Street Survey : Two decades of assessing the public use of Basque." Int. Jo. of the Sociology of Language 224: 209 – 227.

2012 Jacqueline Urla. "Total Quality Language Revival." Monica Heller and Alexandre Duchene, eds. Language in Late Capitalism: Pride and Profit. Routledge. Pp. 73-92.

2001 Jacqueline Urla. "'We are all Malcolm X!' Negu Gorriak, Hip Hop and the Basque Political Imaginary." Global Noise: Hip Hop Outside the USA. Tony Mitchell, ed. Wesleyan University Press. Pp. 171-193.

 

Heidi Bauer-Clapp

Heritage; ethics; violence theory; dark tourism; policy; repatriation; community engagement. Areas of specialization: St. Helena/South Atlantic Ocean; UK.

 

Gina Marie Agostini

PhD (ABD)

email: Osteodonna@gmail.com

 

 

Interests

Postcranial variation and plasticity, developmental modularity and functional integration of postcrania, hominin and primate evolution, population genetics, "Evo Devo”

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. Anthropology, French minor, University of Arkansas 2007

M.A. Anthropology (Bioarchaeology concentration), North Carolina State University, 2009

 

Advisor(s)

Brigitte Holt

 

Biography and Research Interests

I study bones, specifically bone functional adaptation (BFA). BFA is a fancy way of saying that our arm and leg bones change shape in response to physical activity throughout our lives. Any major change in physical activity (e.g., starting couch-to-5k, starting a job that requires heavy lifting, gaining/losing weight) stresses our bones in new ways and triggers them to change shape so they don’t break. This makes long bones an important way to figure out behavior and activity from skeletons we find in forensic, archaeological or fossil contexts. My research looks at the role that genes and developmental processes play in shaping long bones and how long bones might also reveal important information about genetic relationships between modern humans and our ancestors. This means I get to study human and nonhuman primates in all sorts of contexts— from 3-million-year old fossils to modern cases.

 

 

Publications

Agostini GM, AH Ross. 2011. The Effect of Weight on the Proximal Femur: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Shape” J Forensic Sci 56(2):339-343

Ge Jian

Machmer 203
gjian@umass.edu

Education

B.A. Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China, 1999; Ph.D. University of Washington, Seattle, 2016.

Area(s) of Specialization

Linguistic and Cultural Anthropology; East Asia and Central Asia.

Research Description

I am a linguistic and cultural anthropologist with a geographic focus on China. My work in general explores how language and power interact and operate in the discourses of race/ethnicity, class, gender and disabilities, and the inequalities this interaction generates in these discourses. My dissertation is an ethnography of the power dynamics between the international lingua franca English, the national language Mandarin Chinese and the local ethnic minority language Uyghur (a Turkic language) in Xinjiang in Northwestern China, a historically and geopolitically contested Muslim area at the crossroads of Eurasia.

Course Offering

Fall 2017

ANTHRO 105 Language, Culture and Communication

ANTHRO 397LG Language, Gender and Sexuality

Spring 2018

ANTHRO 105 Language, Culture and Communication

ANTHRO 397MC Islam and Muslim Cultures in China

Ge Jian

Lecturer
Office Hours: Monday 1:30-2:30pm
203 Machmer
545-2658
gjian@umass.edu

Felicity Aulino

Five College Assistant Professor

felicity@anthro.umass.edu

Medical anthropology: global health studies, care and caregiver subjectivity, population aging, public health and humanitarian intervention, Buddhism, embodiment, psychological anthropology, ethnographic film, participatory action research, critical phenomenology. Areas of Specialization: Thailand, Mainland Southeast Asia

Curriculum Vitae

Example Profile

At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Temporibus autem quibusdam et aut officiis debitis aut rerum necessitatibus saepe eveniet ut et voluptates repudiandae sint et molestiae non recusandae.

Evan Taylor

PhD

email: eptaylor@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-36

 

 

Interests

politics of the past; transnationalism; temporality; representation, visuality, and recognition; urban anthropology

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, University of Waterloo 2011

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst 2012

Advisor(s)

Elizabeth Chilton

Eric Johnson

Director, Archaeological Services
Machmer E-11 
ericjohnson@anthro.umass.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., Duke University, 1978; M.A., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 1981; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 1993
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Archaeology, Northeastern North America, Cultural Resource Management
 

Research Description:

I have been involved in archaeological research, review and compliance, and teaching in Massachusetts for more than 35 years. I have worked for archaeological consulting firms, the Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Office, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Presently I am Director of UMass Archaeological Services, a research group that conducts client-based archaeology in the New England region and offers UMass students opportunities for hands-on independent study research and internships.


Key Publications:

2012 Roads, Rails and Trails: Transportation-Related Archaeological Research in Massachusetts. 58-page popular booklet prepared for Massachusetts Historical Commission and Mass DOT.

2012 Ancient Winters: Archaeology of the Flagg Swamp Rockshelter, Marlborough, Massachusetts. 57-page popular booklet prepared for Massachusetts Historical Commission and Mass DOT.

2003 Forest Management in the Ancient Northeast: Evidence from Stockbridge, MA. Bulletin of the Massachusetts Archaeological Society 64(2):3-43.

2000 Interpretations of Native North American Life: Material Contributions to Ethnohistory. Co-edited with Michael S. Nassaney. University Press of Florida and the Society for Historical Archaeology, Gainesville.

2000 The Politics of Pottery: Material Culture and Political Process Among Algonquians of Seventeenth-Century Southern New England. Interpretations of Native North American Life: Material Contributions to Ethnohistory, edited by Michael S. Nassaney and Eric S. Johnson, pp. 118-145. University Press of Florida and the Society for Historical Archaeology, Gainesville.

1999 Community and Confederation: A Political Geography of Contact-Period Southern New England, The Archaeological Northeast, edited by Mary Ann Levine, Michael S. Nassaney, and Kenneth E. Sassaman, pp.155-168. Bergin and Garvey, Westport, Connecticut.

1998 "Released from Thraldom By the Stroke of War": Coercion and Warfare in Native Politics of Seventeenth-Century Southern New England. Northeast Anthropology 55:1-13.

1996 Uncas and the Politics of Contact. In Northeastern Indian Lives, 1632-1816, edited by Robert S. Grumet, pp. 29-47. University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst.

 

Elizabeth Krause

Professor
Machmer 205
B.J., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1984; M.A., Oregon State University, 1992; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1999
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Population politics, especially low fertility; cultural politics of race, gender and class, particularly as related to reproduction; social memory and historical anthropology; economic anthropology; global families; ethnography and writing culture; immigration; Italy and U.S.

Key Publications:

Books

2018         Tight Knit: Global Families and the Social Life of Fast Fashion. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

2009         Unraveled: A Weaver’s Tale of Life Gone Modern. Berkeley: University of California Press. 

2005         A Crisis of Births: Population Politics and Family-Making in Italy. Case Studies on Contemporary Social Issues. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 

Articles and Chapters

2018         Krause, Elizabeth L., and Massimo Bressan. Circulating Children, Underwriting Capitalism: Chinese Global Households and Italian Fast-Fashion. Current Anthropology 59(5): 572–595

2018         Gubrium, Aline C., and Elizabeth L. Krause. “Doing Your Life”: Narrative Intervention with Young Mothers as Storytellers. Human Organization 77(3): 214-227.

2018         Krause, Elizabeth L. Reproduction in Retrospective, Or What’s All the Fuss over Low Fertility? In International Handbook on Gender and Demographic Processes, Springer Series on Population, edited by Nancy E. Riley and Jan Brunson, 73–82. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

2017         Krause, Elizabeth L., and Massimo Bressan. Via Gramsci: Hegemony and Wars of Position in the Streets of Prato. International Gramsci Journal 2(3):31–66. Special issue on Gramsci and Anthropology: A “Round Trip.”

2017         Bressan, Massimo, and Elizabeth L. Krause. La cultural del controllo: Letture subaltern di un conflito urbano. Antropologia, December 2017: 131–151.

2016         Gubrium, Aline C., Alice Fiddian-Green, Kasey Jernigan, and Elizabeth L. Krause. Bodies As Evidence: Mapping New Terrain for Teen Pregnancy and Parenting. Global Public Health 11(5–6) 

2015         Krause, Elizabeth L. “Fistful of Tears”: Encounters with Transnational Affect, Chinese Immigrants and Italian Fast Fashion. Cambio 5(10): 27–40.  Special Issue on Work and Difference, edited by Massimo Bressan and Sebastiano Ceschi.

2015        Krause, Elizabeth L., and Silvia De Zordo. Ethnography and Biopolitics: Tracing “Rationalities” of Reproduction across the North-South Divide. Introduction to Reproduction and Biopolitics: Ethnographies of Governance, “Irrationality” and Resistance, Silvia De Zordo and Milena Marchesi, eds. Pp. 1–16. London: Routledge. [Reprint.]

2015        Krause, Elizabeth L. The Value of Money: A Fresh Glimpse of Globalization and the Case of Prato. Prato Storia & Arte 117 (June):100–110. Prato: Fondazione Cassa Risparmio di Prato.

2015        C. Marjorie Aelion, Aline Gubrium, Felicity Aulino, Elizabeth L. Krause, Thomas Leatherman. Bridging Graduate Education in Public Health and the Liberal Arts. American Journal of Public Health 105:S78-S82.

2014        Aline Gubrium, Elizabeth L. Krause, and Kasey Jernigan. Strategic Authenticity and Voice: New Ways of Seeing and Being Seen as Young Mothers through Digital Storytelling. Sexuality Research and Social Policy 11:337–347.

2014        Bressan, Massimo, and Elizabeth L. Krause. “Ho un luogo dove lavoro e un luogo dove abito.” Diversità e separazione in un distretto industriale in transizione (“I have a place where I work and a place where I live”: Diversity and Separation in an Industrial District in Transition), Mondi Migranti 8(1): 59–81.

2013        Krause, Elizabeth L. and Anurag Sharma. “Calling the Question”: The Politics of Time in a Time of Polarized Politics. Cambio 3(6): 13–26.

 

Elizabeth Chilton

Professor

Cultural heritage, archaeology, hunter-gatherers, the origins of agriculture, origins of social complexity, technological organization, ceramic ecology, geoarchaeology, and cultural resource management, Native peoples of northeastern North America.

Scholarworks Webpage
 

Elias Capello

MA/PhD

email: ecapello@umass.edu

Machmer W-14

 

 

Interests

embodiment of stress, perceptions of safety, depression, and LGBT health

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.S., Neuroscience, Centenary College of Louisiana

 

Advisor(s)

Dr. Lynnette Sievert

 

Biography and Research Interests

I'm a biocultural anthropologist who studies how oppression gets under the skin. I study cultural and biological variance in transgender people across the United States. Currently, I am working on a project to document and measure perceptions of safety and depression as they relate to social support.

Publications

(2015) Capello, E and Butcher, G. Assessment of the male-sex bias in Parkinson's: a meta-analysis. Impulse. link:http://impulse.appstate.edu/sites/impulse.appstate.edu/files/Capello%20and%20Butcher%20%20(1).pdf

Elena Sesma

PhD

email: esesma@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E36

 

 

Interests

historical archaeology; archaeology of the African Diaspora; feminist archaeology; public archaeology; memory

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology and Womens’ Studies, University of Maryland 2011

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst 2014

Advisor(s)

Whitney Battle-Baptiste

Biography and Research Interests

My dissertation research focuses on the community memory of a rural Bahamian landscape and former 19th century plantation. Through ethnographic methods and community collaboration, I hope to design an archaeological study of the plantation site in cooperation with the local descendant community.

Publications

Sesma, Elena. 2015. 'A Web of Community': Uncovering African American Historic Sites in Deerfield, MA. Journal of Community Archaeology and Heritage 2(2): 121-136.

Eleanor Finley

MA/PhD

email: efinley@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-34

Office Hours: Mon, Weds 11-12

 

 

Interests

Social movements; political ecology; energy; science and technology; climate justice & degrowth; Spain.

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

MA, Philosophy. Virginia Commonwealth University, 2010.

Advisor(s)

Jacqueline Urla

Biography and Research Interests

Eleanor Finley’s research interests include environmental justice, climate activism, and debates over unconventional fossil fuels in Europe. Her fieldwork focuses on grassroots activism against hydraulic fracturing in Spain. In addition to graduate studies, she is an author, an activist, and a board member at the Institute for Social Ecology.

Derek Doughty

PhD

email: ddoughty@anthro.umass.edu

web: DerekDoughty.com

 

Interests

Political Economy of American Collegiate Athletics, Critical Race Theory, Men and Masculinity Studies, Higher Education Assessment

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. Anthropology, Amherst College 1999

M.A. Anthropology, UMass Amherst 2016

 

Advisor(s)

Amanda Walker Johnson

 

Biography and Research Interests

Previous projects of significance include collaboration in SCUA Credo digitization projects with Joel Halpern and W.E.B. Du Bois collections and participation in the restoration of the Downtown Du Bois Mural in Great Barrington, MA. Currently researching the experiences of male students of color attending historically white colleges and universities.

Derek Doughty, MA, is an Assistant Ombudsperson and an Applied Anthropologist. He focuses on removing barriers to student success, particularly for Blacks and Hispanics at Predominantly-White universities. Since graduating from Amherst College in 1999, Derek has utilized his experiences as a Black male student athlete to bring a much-needed perspective to higher education policy formation. Whether working for the governors of Missouri and Georgia on education reform, access initiatives or mobilizing urban communities as a State Field Director for social justice related ballot initiatives like marriage equality in Maryland, hard hats for green jobs in Virginia, sustainable education finance reform in Nevada, and anti-discrimination efforts in Colorado, he incorporates a Black feminist lens into all of his endeavors. He is committed to help ensure that the intersections of race, class, and gender are front and center during the various phases of all of his professional and academic projects.

Derek's master's thesis utilized critical race theory and participant action research to investigate the redemption of W.E.B. Du Bois's legacy in his hometown Great Barrington, Massachusetts, which culminated in a mural celebrating his connection to the Berkshires. As a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts, Derek has worn many hats in his service to advance students and local communities, including President of the graduate employee union, Co-founder of the Chancellor's Workplace Bullying and Campus Climate Committee, Trustee for Safe Passage (a local non-profit that works to prevent domestic violence prevention and support survivors), to being the Co-chair of the UMass Title IX Education Committee. Derek has consistently relied upon his applied anthropologist training to craft data informed strategies to assess community challenges, deploy appropriate resources and solutions collaboratively with all stakeholders. His current role as a Case Manager based in the Dean of Students Office and the Department of Athletics, aligns well with his dissertation research: identifying strategies for facilitating the success of Black male student athletes at predominantly White institutions. Derek's design and implementation of this unique position has been featured in Student Affairs Today and College Athletics and the Law.

Derek resides in western Massachusetts where he enjoys hiking, fishing, and participating in local softball and bowling leagues.

Publications

 

 

Danielle Raad

PhD

email: draad@umass.edu

Machmer E17

 

Interests

Public education; archaeological materials; Near Eastern archaeology; feminism; human-animal and human-landscape interactions 

 

Biography

Degrees earned:
B.Sc., Chemistry, Brown University, 2010
M.A., Chemistry, Harvard University, 2012
S.M., Materials Science and Engineering, MIT, 2015
M.Ed., High School Education, Lesley University, 2016

 

Advisor(s)

Whitney Battle-Baptiste

 

Biography and Research Interests

 

Publications

Daniel Habtemichael

PhD (ABD)

email: daniel@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E14

By appt.

CV:

Interests

archaeological investigation of economic, cultural and political interactions in East Africa, Red Sea, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean worlds; the emergence and maintenance of social complexity, urbanism and states; military technology of ancient world; agency informed approaches to modeling exchange and urbanism using GIS-based spatial modeling/simulation of urban forms and social landscapes

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Asmara, 2001

M.A., Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, 2003

 

Advisor(s)

Michael Sugerman

 

Biography and Research Interests

Daniel Habtemichael is a doctoral candidate at Umass-Amherst Anthropology Department. He started his academic journey as an archaeology student in highlands of Asmara, Eritrea; where due to an immense need for archeologists and lack of them made the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology at the University of Asmara involve students in actual archaeological research. The Highlands of Asmara, which was threatened due to development projects, was defined as a province of ancient Axum based on selective texts. As the archeological data from 300 square km accumulated through surveys and excavations, the definition of Axum as a core and the highlands of Asmara as province proved to be patchy and incoherent. The settlements at the Highlands of Asmara predated by 1000 years than Axum with long distance relationship that reached as far as Asia. Without clear theoretical formulations of what to expect from the material culture in the Highlands of Asmara, the archaeological practice settled in data driven new reformulation of the region’s past. In return problematization of the center/province of the region was needed. The classifications of the region into center/province unsupported by material evidence adversely limited the interpretative power of the archeological record. In his Masters thesis, Habtemichael surveyed 6 square kilometers at Keskese Valley. Keskese Valley is located between Asmara Highlands and Axum. According to the Axum-centric theoretical explanation, Keskese Valley belongs to the pre-Axumite period dominated by Middle Eastern immigrants that settled at Keskese Valley at about middle of the first millennium. These immigrants are believed to bring with them agriculture, script and governance. After intermarriage with the locals, the Middle Eastern immigrants gave rise to Axum. Thus, an exogenous impetus for the rise of Axum, and the surrounding regions as provinces was formulated. Habtemichael's research question at Keskese Valley was whether the archaeological evidence supports this immigration claim for the rise of complex society in the region. He documented eight sites and analyzed artifacts and conducted lab analysis. The research has demonstrated the archaeological record does not support the immigration impetus for social complexity. The material culture of Keskese Valley displayed a closer affinity to archeological sites in the region than any Middle Eastern sites. Moreover, it was shown that the region is one of the eight centers of food domestication, which domesticated Teff and Finger Millet in the fourth millennium or earlier, and coffee at a later stage that are unique to the region as evidenced by the archeological record. There is no need to attribute the rise of complex society to exogenous impetus when food domestication, writing culture and governance in the region can be demonstrated through the archaeological evidence as local developments. The finding of this research was published in peer-reviewed journal, Journal of Eritrean Studies in 2004. In his Dissertation research, Habtemichael is seeking to contribute to a deeper understanding of the political economy of Red Sea by investigating ancient port of Adulis, located on the western shores of Red Sea, in Eritrea. The dissertation research employs archeological, ethnohistoric, textual and experimental data to model the local political economy of Adulis within a broader context of Northern Horn of Africa and the Red Sea political economy.

 

Publications

Books

2007 David Peacock, Lucy Blue, Darren Glazier, Julian Whitewright, Jillian Phillips, Penny Coperland, Yohannes Gebreyesus, Daniel Habtemichael and Rezene Russom, ed., The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea: Results of the Eritro-British Expedition, 2004-5. Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books.

2004 Daniel Habtemichael, Yohannes Gebreyesus, David Peacock, and Lucy Blue ed., Eritro-British Project at Adulis. Volume I. Asmara-Southampton: University of Asmara/ University of Southampton Press.

Book Chapters

2008 Peter Schmidt, Daniel Habtemichael, and Matthew Curtis, Ancient Gold Mining North of Asmara: A Focus on Hara Hot. In The Archaeology of Ancient Eritrea. Peter Schmidt, Matthew Curtis and Zelalem Teka, eds. Trenton, NJ and Asmara, Eritrea: Red Sea Press, Inc.,(p.178-187)

2008 Matthew Curtis and Daniel Habtemichael., Matara, Keskese, and the Classical Period: Archaeology of the Akele Guzay Highlands, A Brief Overview. In The Archaeology of Ancient Eritrea. Peter Schmidt, Matthew Curtis and Zelalem Teka, eds. Trenton, NJ and Asmara, Eritrea: Red Sea Press, Inc.,(p.311-327)

2008 Lucy Blue, Yohannes Gebreyesus, Daren Glazier, Daniel Habtemichael, David Peacock, and Rezene Russom., Assessing Ancient Adulis: Recent Investigations of the Ancient Red Sea Port. In The Archaeology of Ancient Eritrea. Peter Schmidt et al. ed. Trenton, NJ and Asmara, Eritrea: The Red Sea Press, Inc.,(p.301-309)

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

2004 Daniel Habtemichael, and Zeriesnay Habtezion., Collection Study at the National Museum of Eritrea. Journal of Eritrean Studies, 3(3):63-77.

2004 The Sabean Man’s Burden: Questioning the Dominant Historical Paradigm with New Archaeological Findings at Keskese Valley. Journal of Eritrean Studies, 3(2): 25-52.

Book Review

2007 Review of The Nubian Past: An Archaeology of the Sudan, by David N. Edwards. African Studies Review, 50(2): 225-226.

 

Dana Johnson

PhD

email: johnson.danan@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Cultural anthropology; economic and political anthropology; migration and mobility; policy and governance; temporality and historicity; civil society and NGOs; area specialization in postsocialist Eastern Europe (Serbia)

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., International Studies, DePaul University, 2003

M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2012

Advisor(s)

Julie Hemment

Dan Lynch

PhD

email: dlync0@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Historical archaeology and heritage studies, the Irish Diaspora, politics of representation, historical erasure, the materiality of anti-Catholicism, geophysical survey methods, and teaching anthropology.

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

MA, Anthropology, Western Michigan University

Advisor(s)

Jean Forward

Cecilia Vasquez

MA/PhD

email: civasquez@anthro.umass.edu

 

Interests

US-Mexican Border, migration policies, chicana feminism

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A. University of California Berkeley

 

Advisor(s)

Dr. Sonya Atalay

 

Biography and Research Interests

Analysis of death certificates and social profiles of deaths on the US-Mexican border

Castriela Hernandez Reyes

PhD 

email: chernandez@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E34

Wednesdays 9:00 - 10: 00 a.m., and by appointment

 

Interests

Black Diaspora and Decolonial Feminism, Anthropology of Memory, Intersectionality of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality; Race and Racism; Internal Armed Conflicts, War and Peace-building processes; Power and State Violence; Postcolonial/Decolonial theory; Critical Race theory; Social Movements; Black women's Resistance Practices; Human Rights and Forced Displacement; Development and neoliberalism; Anthropology of Education, and Archival Anthropological research

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, Basic Education, major in Social Sciences, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas, 2010; Bogotá - Colombia

Specialist in Regional Development Management, Universidad de los Andes, 2011, Bogotá - Colombia;

MA, Sociocultural Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015;

Graduate Certificate African Diaspora Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015;

Graduate Certificate Latin American and Caribbean Latino Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015,

 

Advisor(s)

Dr. Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Dr. Amanda Walker-Jonhson

 

Biography and Research Interests

I am a Palenquera woman who born in Barranquilla city, Colombia. Am a researcher, an activist, and a black intellectual woman who is proud to be the daughter of a Palenquera woman very fighter and hardworking. As a Ph.D. student in the Department of Anthropology, my research revolves around the examination of how the intersections of race, class and gender play a central role in the understanding of the historical and contemporary political violence in Colombia, as well as in the building process of collective and conscious memories of war in this country. My research focuses on the process through which the Afrocolombian women victims of war individually, collectively and actively respond to multiples forms of exclusion, dispossession, and oppression produced and reproduced by the very violences. Specifically, I am working on the Caribbean region in the area known as Montes de Maria, a rural territory with a long historical tradition of peasant struggles, and that is currently the first Peace laboratory named by the Colombian government after the impacts and consequences of the armed violence that have taken place in such territory.

 

Publications

Book chapter: “Aproximaciones al Sistema de Sexo/Género en la Nueva Granada en los Siglos XVIII y XIX” in the Volume entitled Demando mi Libertad:Relatos de Mujeres Negras y sus estrategias de Resistencia en Nueva Granada, Venezuela y Cuba” (Demanding my freedom: Black Women’s stories and their strategies of resistance in New Granada, Venezuela and Cuba) (Forthcoming)

Cary Speck

MA/PhD

email: cspeck@anthro.umass.edu

Violence and Conflict Laboratory (Machmer W-12)

Office Hours: 12:30-2:30

 

 

Interests

Postsocialism; Czech Republic; foodways; community gardening; violence studies; gender

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, History and Anthropology (with honors), Grinnell College, 2012

Advisor(s)

Krista Harper, Julie Hemment

Biography and Research Interests

My work focuses on masculinities, sustainability and postsocialist transformation in Central and Eastern Europe. Cary's current research traces changing patterns of self provisioning and environmental personhood in the Czech Republic.

Publications

Don’t cramp my style: Challenging Millennial students to experience culture through film. By Katie Kirakosian, Virginia McLaurin, and Cary Speck (forthcoming)

Caitlin Homrich

MA

email: chomrich@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer E-34

Office Hours: Wed. 1:30-3:30

 

 

Interests

Community organizing, critical pedagogy, schooling, social justice activism, community education, participatory-action research, feminist anthropology

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, Central Michigan University, 2014

Advisor(s)

Amanda Walker Johnson

Biography and Research Interests

Cait Homrich does participatory-action research and autoethnography with community-based anti-racism education organizations in the United States. She is currently focusing on the development of white allies of racial justice in the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts, asking what practice-based changes white people make when developing an anti-racist identity.

Brigitte Holt

Associate Professor
Machmer 103 
holtb@anthro.umass.edu
Website
Curriculum Vitae

Education:

B.A., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, 1984; M.A., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, 1987; Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1999
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Biological anthropology, human evolution (Upper Paleolithic/Ice Age), skeletal robusticity and physical activity
 

Research Description:

I am a biological anthropologist interested in human evolution, and in the ways humans adapt, biologically and culturally, to their environment. I am passionate about all things relating to the last Ice Age and have published on the behavior and lives of modern humans and Neandertals during that fascinating time period. One of my research interests has been on the relationship between physical activity and postcranial skeletal robusticity as a means of inferring behavior in past populations. Some of my research has focused on the link between lower limb bone strength and long distance mobility in Upper Paleolithic populations from Europe. More recently, I have, along with colleagues in the US and Europe collected postcranial robusticity data on over 2000 human skeletons from Upper Paleolithic to the present. This data allowed has revealed how changes in physical activity across major socio-economic transitions such as hunter-gathering to agriculture, the rise of social inequalities and the Industrial Revolution has affected limb robusticity patterns in men and women.
 
I am very excited about two current projects. One aims to link bone robusticity patterns with observed physical activity in a living population (a group of horticulturalists in Bolivia called the Tsimane). This project will provide funding and opportunities for independent research for several graduate students. A second project, currently on going, aims to reconstruct the lives of people in a Medieval coastal town in Italy (11th-14th centuries). A large human skeletal collection from one of the town’s cemetery is housed in my lab. I currently have six students working on this exciting material. I encourage any student interested in working on the collection, either for experience working with human remains, or for undergraduate and graduate research projects, to contact me. There is plenty of work to do!
 

Key Publications:

See CV.

Boone Shear

Lecturer
Machmer 207A 
bshear@umass.edu
Curriculum Vitae


Education:

B.A., Western Michigan University, 2003; M.A., Western Michigan University, 2006; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015
 

Area(s) of Specialization:

Post-Capitalism, Community Economies, Ontological Politics, Higher Education, Engaged Research and Pedagogy
 

Research Description:

My research interests coalesce around critical investigations of capitalism and efforts to imagine and organize around hidden, suppressed, or unrealized ways of being in the world. I work with groups and movements that are involved in or organizing around ethical ways of producing, distributing, and consuming stuff. In particular, I am interested in economic subjectivity, neoliberal development, post-capitalism and ontological politics, activism and community engagement, political ecology, and public anthropology.
 
I live with my 11-year-old daughter in Amherst. We like to play badminton, swim, garden, read, watch movies, and goof around.


Key Publications:

2017 Learning Under Neoliberalism: Explorations of Neoliberal Governance at the University. Edited with Sue Hyatt and Susan Wright. Berghahn Press.

2015 Loh, Penn and Shear, Boone W. Solidarity Economy and Community Development: Emerging Cases in Three Massachusetts Cities. Community Development. 46 (3): 1-17.

2014 Shear, Boone W. Making the Green Economy: Politics, Desire, and Economic Possibility. Journal of Political Ecology. 21: 193-209.

2013 Shear, Boone W. and Vin Lyon-Callo. Kalamazoo’s Promise: Exploring the Violence of Economic Development. City and Society. 25(1): 70-91.

 

Bonnie Newsom

PhD

email: bnewsom@anthro.umass.edu

 

 

Interests

Indigenous Archaeologies; Anthropology and Public Policy; Federal Historic Preservation Law (NAGPRA, NMAI Act and NHPA); Intellectual Property in Cultural Heritage; Human Agency and Archaeology; Native People of the Northeast; Aboriginal Ceramics of the Northeast; Tourism and Cultural Heritage; Archaeology and Community Development; Tribal Historic Preservation

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.A., Anthropology, Universityof Maine, 1995

M.S., Quaternary Studies, University of Maine, 1999

Advisor(s)

Elizabeth Chilton

 

Biography and Research Interests

Bonnie Newsom is a member of the Penobscot Nation and President of Nutalket Consulting–a Native American owned and operated small business specializing in heritage preservation services. Bonnie holds a B.A. in Anthropology and an M.S. in Quaternary Studies from the University of Maine. Currently, she is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research interests reflect a commitment to community engagement, Indigenous archaeologies, and social justice in archaeology. Prior to starting her own business, Bonnie served for ten years as Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Penobscot Nation. Other positions she has held include a research archaeology position with Archaeological Research Consultants of Ellsworth, Maine and Assistant Director of the Wabanaki Center at the University of Maine. At present, she is Chair of the Repatriation Review Committee for the Smithsonian Institution and is the first Wabanaki woman to serve as a Trustee for the University of Maine System.

 

Publications

Primary Author with Jamie Bissonette-Lewey: “Wabanaki Resistance and Healing: An Exploration of the Contemporary Role of an Eighteenth Century Bounty Proclamation in an Indigenous Decolonization Process” in Landscapes of Violence, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, March 2012

Secondary Author with Dr. Arthur Spiess and Leon Cranmer: “Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site” in American Indian Places, Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston, Massachusetts, September 2008 ·Author: Afterword to Life and Traditions of the Red Man by Joseph Nicolar (reprint) Duke University Press, 2007

Secondary Author with Dr. David Sanger: “Middle Archaic in the Lower Piscataquis River, and its Relationship to the Laurentian Tradition in Central Maine” 2000 Maine Archaeological Society Bulletin, Volume 40:1, 1-22 TECHNICAL REPORTS

“Archaeological Investigations at a WWII German Prisoner of War Camp Site at Motahkomikuk, Indian Township, Maine.” Report submitted to the Passamaquoddy Tribal Historic Preservation Office, Passamaquoddy Tribe, Motahkomikuk, Indian Township, Maine, January 2014.

“Developing Policies and Protocols for the Culturally Sensitive Intellectual Properties of the Penobscot Nation of Maine.” Report submitted to the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Program. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, November 2013

“Ancient Ones and Cultural Affiliation: An Examination of the Evidence from Maine.” Report Prepared for Acadia National Park, National Park Service, Bar Harbor, Maine, 2010.

Primary Author with Dr. David Sanger: Phase II Archaeological Investigations of the Howland Reservoir, Central Maine 1998 CRM Report submitted to Bangor Hydro-Electric Company, Bangor, Maine

Secondary Author with Ms. Karen Mack and Dr. Alice Kelley: An Archaeological Assessment of the Howland Reservoir: Results of Phase I Investigations 1997 CRM Report submitted to Bangor Hydro- Electric Company, Bangor, Maine

Beverly Morrison

bmorrison@umass.edu
Beverly Morrison has over 15 years of experience in all facets of office administration and project management, with expertise in the realm of human resources.  Prior to joining the University, she was the Assistant Director for the law firm of Bacon Wilson, P.C.  Beverly earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the Isenberg School of Management at UMass Amherst with a minor in Anthropology in 1999, cum laude, and returned to Isenberg to earn a Master of Business Administration in 2014 with a 4.0 GPA.  She is a member of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi for her outstanding academic achievement. 

Find Beverly on Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beverly-morrison-700319b

 

Andrew Zamora

PhD

email: azamora@umass.edu

Machmer W16

 

 

Interests

Genetics underlying the evolution of primate neuroendocrine systems and their influence on social evolution, interactions among biological levels of organization in evolution, Malagasy primates, conservation, phylogenetics.

 

Biography

Degrees Earned
B.S. Biology, Florida International University, 2013
B.A. Psychology, Florida International University, 2013
M.A. Anthropology, (Physical Anthropology concentration) 2015

 

Advisor(s)

Dr. Jason Kamilar

 

Publications:
Meador LR, Godfrey LR, Rakotondramavo J, Ranivoharimanana L, ZamoraA, Sutherland MR, and Irwin MT. (submitted November 2016, underreview). Cryptoprocta spelea: what did it eat and how do we know? Journal of Mammalian Evolution

Zamora A, Rasolondravoavy C, and Wright PC. (in prep). Ecological influences on group compositions of Milne-Edward's sifaka (Propithecus edwardsi) in an unprotected forest, southeaster Madagascar.

Herrera JP and Zamora A. (in prep). Reassessing the presence of multiple species in subfossil lemur samples using size variation.

Andrew Best

PhD

email: abest@umass.edu

Machmer W-14

 

 

Interests

evolution of endurance running in humans; trabecular bone adaptation in human runners; ecological energetics of genus Homo

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

B.S., Biology, St. Michael's College, 2004

M.A., Teaching, Quinnipiac University, 2006

M.A., Anthropology, UMass Amherst Feb. 2016

Publications

What did Hadropithecus eat, and why should paleoanthropologists care? Laurie R. Godfrey*, Brooke E. Crowley, Kathleen M. Muldoon, Elizabeth A. Kelley, Stephen J. King, Andrew W. Best, and Michael A. Berthaume

In preparation: Trabecular bone adaptation in forefoot and rearfoot endurance runners: Implications for interpreting fossil hominin morphology. Andrew Best, Brigitte Holt, Joseph Hamill, and Karen Troy.

Ana Del Conde

PhD

email: adelconde@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer W12
Office Hours: Wed 10:00-12

 

 

Interests

Social movements and community action; space and identity; collective memory; decolonial feminisms; political economy; state violence

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

MA, Anthropology and Cultural Politics, Goldsmiths University of London, 2012

Advisor(s)

Emiliana Cruz

Biography and Research Interests

My research interest focuses on looking at different collective sociopolitical projects that emerge as a way to resist structures of oppression and resource devastation in contemporary Mexico. More specifically, my dissertation will look at the ways different municipalities in Michoacán are developing novel governance strategies where women are present at the forefront, pushing for alternative political, social and economic projects, while protecting their natural resources. My work is trying to explore the correlation between the high levels of socioeconomic exclusion that neoliberalism has generated in Mexico in the past three decades and the establishment of powerful illegal structures.

Amanda Walker Johnson

Associate Professor

Cultural Anthropology: I am a cultural anthropologist interested in the intersection of critical race theory, anthropology of science, and critical educational theory, and I am committed to conducting research and pedagogy as work for social justice. My research examines the ways in which systems of standardized testing and the production of "scientific" knowledge about race, segregation, failure, and risk, particularly as products of standardized testing, impact education in the US, particularly for African Americans and Latino/as. Additionally, I teach courses related to education and race; critical race theory and political economy of race in the US; feminist theories of race, body, and nation; and cultural and identity politics in the African Diaspora.

Adam Zimmer

PhD

email: azimmer@anthro.umass.edu

Machmer W-12

 

 

Interests

biocultural anthropology, anthropology of violence, healthcare policy, health in the African Diaspora, bioarchaeology of dissection and autopsy, cadaver ethics

 

Biography

Degrees Earned

BA, Anthropology and Music (Voice) double major (with honors), Ithaca College, 2013

MA, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2016

 

Advisor(s)

Dr. Ventura Pérez

 

Biography and Research Interests

I am a Graduate Research Fellow in biocultural bioarchaeology funded by the National Science Foundation. My current work examines the effects of racial discrimination and healthcare policy on the health of historical American populations in urban centers.