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New to Isenberg? Here Are Some Things to Know

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Students in front of Isenberg school of management

Whether you are a freshman or an on-campus transfer (also known as an "internal transfer"), being new to the Isenberg School of Management at UMass is an exciting experience. I switched into Isenberg my sophomore year and was baffled by how different the business school was from other colleges on campus. Below, I’m going to delineate some of the must-know things about Isenberg for any student considering business.

1. Business students seriously love Isenberg

The business school at UMass has an incredibly unique personality. The students have immense pride in their school and are not afraid to show it! "Isenberg swag" is an extremely hot commodity. In the hallways, don't be surprised if you are swimming through a sea of Isenberg sweatshirts and ball caps. We're not obsessed, we just genuinely love our school. This love for Isenberg continues after graduation, as shown by the vast alumni support the school gets.

2. The Isenberg clubs are one of the best ways to network

Every year, Isenberg has an activities expo for all Isenberg-specific clubs. There are clubs for different majors, business fraternities, and even societies that manage mutual funds! Joining one (or many) of these clubs is a great way to make friends in Isenberg, and also one of the best ways to build your network. For example, the Isenberg Marketing Club hosts events specifically for club members to network with companies of which students might be interested in working.

3. Networking in the Atrium (Hub)

During recruiting season, a myriad of companies will come table in the Atrium (also known as the "Hub"). Students are encouraged to network with the various recruiters and learn more about the firms! (You'll also likely get some free snacks and swag in the process. The free handouts range from sunglasses, cookies, to even a full hot chocolate bar!)

4. Despite what people will tell you, there are indeed vending machines in Isenberg

This doesn’t require much detail, but most students in Isenberg don’t actually know this one! There are two fully functional vending machines on the first floor by the bathrooms and Chase Career Center.

5. The Chase Career Center is specifically tailored to Isenberg students

Thanks to generous donations from alumni, Isenberg has a beautiful career center with four amazing career coaches dedicated to helping business students succeed. Students can make appointments for anything job-related: resume reviews, career path advice, interview prep, internship searches, etc.

6. Everyone knows and loves the dean

Isenberg is not one of those schools where students can’t name their dean. Instead, Dean Fuller walks through the halls like a local celebrity. Students feel completely comfortable waving to him, and he makes a genuine effort to get to know the students.

Switching into Isenberg was one of the best decisions I made in college. I am completely thrilled with the experience I have had in this school, and I hope anyone switching in will read this and be a bit less nervous. The support I've received in the college has been tremendous, and the resources and programming available play a large role in ensuring student success. I have nothing but praise for Isenberg, and I would recommend it to anyone who thinks business might be for them.

 

Topic: 

Academics

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