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Chicago Style Citation (Short) Guide

Creating a Works Cited Page

Your works cited page should: 1) be double- spaced, 2) have the title “Works Cited” centered at the top of the page, 3) employ a hanging indent throughout, and 4) be alphabetized by the first letter of each entry. The following are formatting guidelines for some of the most common types of citation.

Book by one author:

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.

Book by multiple authors:

Lastname, Firstname, and Firstname Lastname. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.

Article in a journal (example):

MacDonald, Susan Peck. “The Erasure of Language.” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 585-625.

Article from an electronic journal (example):

Bent, Henry E. "Professionalization of the Ph.D. Degree.” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 0-145. Accessed December 5, 2008. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1978286.

Lecture (example):

Hanstedt, Paul. “This is Your Brain on Writing: The Implications of James Zull’s The Art of Changing the Brain for the Writing Classroom.” Presentation at the Annual Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA, March 11-14, 2009.

Video (e.g. YouTube video):

"Title of Video." Name of website, Length of video. Posted by "username," upload Month Day, Year. URL.

In-Text Citations (Footnotes)

Book by one author:

1. Firstname Lastname, Title of Book (Place of  publication: Publisher, Year of publication), page number.

Book by multiple authors:

1. Firstname Lastname and Firstname Lastname, Title of Book (Place of  publication: Publisher, Year of publication), page number.

Article in a journal (example):

1. Susan Peck MacDonald, “The Erasure of Language,” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 619.

Article from an electronic journal (example):

1. Henry E. Bent, “Professionalization of the Ph.D. Degree,” College Composition and Communication 58, no. 4 (2007): 141, accessed December 5, 2008, http://www.jstor.org/stable/1978286.

Lecture (example):

1. Paul Hanstedt, “This is Your Brain on Writing: The Implications of James Zull’s The Art of Changing the Brain for the Writing Classroom” (presentation, Annual Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA, March 11-14, 2009).

Video (e.g. YouTube video):

1. "Title of Video." Name of website, Length of video, Posted by "username," upload Month Day, Year, URL.

 

[Adapted by Zach Ballard, Dec. 2015; citation information and examples from Purdue OWL.]