WOST 187B:
INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES

Spring 2002

Instructor: Viera Wallace-Lorencová
E-mail: vk@comm.umass.edu
WOST Main Office,: 208 Bartlett (545-1922)
Mailbox: 208 Bartlett
Course number: Sec.1 , 400 621 (3 credits)
Time: MWF 11:15 - 12:05
Classroom: 201 Bartlett
Office Hours: MW 12:15-13:00 & by appoint.

Course Description This course introduces basic concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies by focusing on both women's history and contemporary women's issues, and by examining women's lives with a particular emphasis on the ways in which gender interacts with race, class, sexual orientation and ethnicity. The central aim is to foster critical reading and thinking about women's lives and the ways in which women resist the interlocking systems of oppression - sexism, heteronormativity, racism, ethnocentrism and colonialism.

Required Texts

(1) Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey. Women's Lives: Multicultural Perspectives. McGraw Hill. Second Edition. 2001. (2) Howard Zinn. A People's History Of The United States: 1492-Present. New York: Harper Perennial. (Twentieth Anniversary Edition). 1999. Books are available at Food For Thought Books, North Pleasant Street, Amherst, (413) 253 5432.

Requirements and Grading

  1. Participate. Your physical presence along with your active participation make up a sizable portion of your grade in this course (25% for attendance, presentation, and 3 quizzes). You are expected to complete assigned readings before the beginning of class and come prepared to discuss the main points and ask/answer relevant questions. Everyone has to sign up for a short presentation of the assigned readings, which will match the topic of your short paper (for details, see pp.2 and 3).

  2. Attendance is mandatory. Keep in mind that every absence will lower your points for attendance and participation and consequently lower your final grade. If you are ill or otherwise impaired, notify me and provide appropriate documentation (see the Handbook of Undergraduates Rights and Responsibilities).

  3. Two equally weighted, non-cumulative exams, the midterm and the final exam, each worth 25% of final grade, composed of both, multiple choice, and essay questions, will cover the material addressed in the assigned readings, lectures, videos, presentations and discussions.

  4. Do your own work. A short paper, two exams and three quizzes are designed to evaluate the knowledge you have gained. Along these lines, plagiarism and dishonesty in any form will not be tolerated. Examples and consequences of plagiarism and the appearance of dishonesty are listed in the Handbook of Undergraduates Rights and Responsibilities -- please familiarize yourselves with the University policy statement on academic honesty (see the Academic Honesty Policy and Appeal Procedure).

Grading Formula

Participation
Short paper
Midterm exam
Final exam
25% attendance, presentation, 3 quizzes
25% 5 pp. Minimum
25% 03/15/02
25% T.B.A. (non-cumulative)

Grade Scale

A
A
B
BC
C
CD
D
F
94-100%
88-93.9%
82-87.9%
76-81.9%
70-75.9%
64-69.9%
60-63.9%
59.9% or lower

Appeals To appeal grades received or points deducted, you must wait at least 24 hours after receiving the grade. Review my comments, and formulate a reasoned argument for your position. Schedule an appointment to meet with me, and if you decide to appeal, write your reasons for appealing and submit it to me with the assignment or exam under question.

Questions I encourage you to ask me any questions regarding the course. Feel free to e-mail me at vk@comm.umass.edu or leave a message by calling the WOST main office (413) 545 1922 or stop by 208 Bartlett and leave a message in my mailbox.


FIRST ASSIGNMENT DUE MONDAY 02/04/02
After you purchase your books, read over the syllabus again, skim through the readings, and start thinking about your presentation and short paper topic. In order to allow me to assign everyone to the topic of their choice, you need to list three topics that you find most interesting. Chose only from the days marked as "Presentations." Consult with me if you have questions. Here is an example of the information I need from you by Mon 02/04/02:

Your name:
3 choices:

(1) Friday 02/08
FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES
Readings: Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 35-48.

(2) Wednesday 02/20
COLONIZATION, INDENTURED SERVITUDE AND SLAVERY
Readings: Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States, Chapter 2, pp.23-38.

(3) Monday 04/01
WOMEN AND WORK
Readings: Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 331-343 & pp. 306-313.


WOST 187 B: Presentation and Short Paper Guidelines

The point of making a schedule for class presentations is to give you time to read ahead and prepare good, concise, thoughtful presentations, and a chance to prepare well for writing your short paper. You do not have to be overly formal in your presentation, but I do want you to take this part of the class requirement seriously and prepare well. I offer here some general guidelines in helping you to do this.

How to Prepare for Your Presentation

  1. Read all of the articles in the unit/theme before reading the selected articles.
  2. Identify and outline the key concepts as you read the articles selected for your presentation.
  3. Read carefully and read ahead - this will allow you to digest the readings and prepare an outline and questions for the discussion.
  4. Think about how the readings relate to the corresponding theme/unit. How do they relate or address other topics we have discussed in the course so far? What new questions or issues do these articles address?
  5. Remember, you are not responsible for addressing everything in the readings! Just identify the main arguments, themes, and present some highlights you believe are worth discussing in greater detail.
  6. Here are some questions you should be able to answer for the individual readings (they are generic questions that may need to be adapted for your particular readings):

    1. What is the author's main point of argument? Summarize it in one or two sentences. Is the author trying to argue against a particular approach or position? If so, what is it? Try to make a note of any unusual aspects of the author's text (e.g. writing style/voice or structure).
    2. Go over the key definitions, if relevant.
    3. What was the most valuable aspect of the reading? Did it give you a new perspective? If so, in what way is that perspective valuable?

  1. Prepare an outline of your presentation. Your outline is due on the day of your presentation. Make sure to print out two copies, so you can keep one.
  2. You can use your notes for a presentation, if you wish. Once you have completed your presentation of the readings (max. 15 minutes), be prepared to raise one or two points for us to discuss.
  3. Again, these are general guidelines. As long as you give an overview of the arguments made in the readings, you may do your presentation in any way that you find effective!

Short Paper Guidelines

  1. You should start working on your paper as you prepare for your presentation -- your paper is due within 7 days after your presentation. Using the presented readings as a reference, write a paper about a particular issue of your choice pertaining to women's lives addressed in the readings.
  2. Your short paper topic must match your presentation topic. You must use presented readings as a reference.
  3. In the introduction, clearly define your topic or your thesis. Your paper should demonstrate your understanding of differences among women, in terms of race/ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, disability and age. It should show a critical line of argument, not just facts and figures.
  4. You are not expected to do an outside research for this assignment. Your writing style, spelling, grammar and punctuation are just as important as the content. Papers must be typed (font size # 12 or 11), proofread, double-spaced, min. 5 pp. long , with standard margins (1.25").
  5. If you quote, paraphrase or summarize, avoid plagiarism -- cite your sources in the form of in-text citations, footnotes or endnotes (APA or MLA style). Remember to include a complete list of Works Cited at the end of your paper (author, title, place and date of publication, page numbers), following APA or MLA style.
  6. Please let me know if you have any questions or dilemmas about this assignment.


WOST 187B Course Schedule

Wednesday 01/30
COURSE INTRODUCTION
Introduction to syllabus, main topics, and requirements.
Introduction to Women's Studies as a discipline. Introduction to ourselves.

Friday 02/01
WOMEN'S LIVES: MULTICULTURAL PERSPECTIVES
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 1-6

Monday 02/04
FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES
Theories, Theorizing, and Ways of Knowing
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp.7-19
Chose a Topic for a Presentation

Wednesday 02/06
FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES
The Social Construction of Gender
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 20-34

Friday 02/08
FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES
Feminisms
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 35-48
Presentations

Monday 02/11
IDENTITIES AND SOCIAL LOCATIONS
Micro-Macro Levels
Readings: Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 49-59

Wednesday 02/13
INTERLOCKING SYSTEMS OF OPPRESSION
Intersections: Class, Race, Gender, Sexuality, Disability, Age
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 69-99
Presentations

Friday 02/15
HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES OF NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 60-67

Tuesday 02/19 (Monday schedule followed)
PRE-CONTACT PERIOD AND FOUNDATIONS OF US SOCIETY: WOMEN'S LIVES
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 1, pp. 1-22
Presentation

Wednesday 02/20
COLONIZATION, INDENTURED SERVITUDE AND SLAVERY
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States, Chapter 2, pp.23-38
Presentation

Friday 02/22
EUROPEAN AMERICAN WOMEN: REPUBLICAN MOTHERHOOD Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 3, pp. 39-58
Presentation

Monday 02/25
THE INITIMATELY OPRESSED
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 6, pp.103-124
Presentation

Wednesday 02/27
ABOLITION AND THE FIRST WAVE OF WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 9, pp. 171-210
Handout: 1838. Grimke, Sarah: Legal Disabilities of Women
Handout: 1848: "The Seneca Falls Declaration"
Handout : Sojourner Truth: Book of Life

Friday 03/01
GENDER, CLASS, RACE, SEXUALITY AND INDUSTRIALIZATION: 1890-1920
Video Screening: Ida B. Wells: A Passion for Justice
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 11, pp. 253-295
To be presented on Monday 03/04

Monday 03/04
SHIFTS IN THE 1920s, 1930s, AND 1940s
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 15, pp. 377-406 & Chapter 16, pp. 443-467
Presentations

Wednesday 03/06
WORLD WAR II: WOMEN, WORK, PATRIARCHY AND PATRIOTISM
Video Screening: Rosie the Riveter

Friday 03/08
WOMEN IN THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND THE SECOND WAVE OF THE WOMEN'S MOVEMENT
Readings:
Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States. Chapter 17, pp. 443-467
Handout
Presentations

Monday 03/11
SEXUALITY DEBATES
Readings:
Handout: "Sex Wars"
Video Screening: Off the Straight and Narrow

Wednesday 03/13
Midterm Review

Friday 03/15
Midterm Exam

Monday 03/25
WOMEN'S SEXUALITY
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 132-146
Presentations

Wednesday 03/27
WOMEN'S SEXUALITY
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp.146-159

Friday 03/29
WOMEN AND WORK
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 314-329 Presentations

Monday 04/01
WOMEN AND WORK
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 331-343 & pp. 306-313
Presentations

Wednesday 04/03
WOMEN AND WORK IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY
Video Screening: The Global Assembly Line

Friday 04/05
WOMEN'S BODIES
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 100-117
Presentations

Monday 04/08
WOMEN'S BODIES
Video Screening: Slim Hopes

Wednesday 04/10
WOMEN'S BODIES
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 118-131.
Presentations

Friday 04/12
RELATIONSHIPS, FAMILIES, AND HOUSEHOLDS
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 160-186
Presentations

Wednesday 04/17 (Monday schedule will be followed)
ALTERNATIVE FAMILIES
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 186-216
Presentations

Friday 04/19
ALTERNATIVE FAMILIES
Video Screening: We Are Family

Monday 04/22
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 217-244
Presentations

Wednesday 04/24
FIGHTING BACK
Video Screening: Defending Our Lives

Friday 04/26
VIOLENCE AND MASCULINITY
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 245-263
Presentations

Monday 04/29
VIOLENCE AND MASCULINITY
Video Screening: Tough Guise

Wednesday 05/01
WOMEN'S HEALTH and REPRODUCTIVE FREEDOM
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 360-374
Handout: Angela Davis: "Racism, Birth Control, and Reproductive Rights"
Handout: "Roe vs. Wade, 410 U.S. 113, 1973"
Presentations

Friday 05/03
MEDICALIZATION OF WOMEN'S BODIES
Video Screening: La Operacion

Monday 05/06
MEDICALIZATION OF WOMEN'S BODIES
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp. 374-417
Presentations

Wednesday 05/08
SOCIAL CHANGE: THEORY, VISION AND ACTION
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp.534-545

Friday 05/10
SOCIAL CHANGE: THEORY, VISION AND ACTION
Readings:
Gwyn Kirk & Margo Okazawa-Rey: Women's Lives, pp.546-580
Video Screening: Guerillas in our Midst

Monday 05/13
Course Evaluations
Presentations

Wednesday 05/15
Exam Review

A final exam will be scheduled during finals week. Do not make plane reservations or plans to leave before you check the final exam schedule.