Jana Evans Braziel, Instructor 15 Bartlett Hall / Hours: 10-11 M,W,F Phone # 545-1922 / 545-0929 / 545-3402

Junior Year Writing for Women's Studies Majors (WOST 391W)

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

The purpose of the course Junior Year Writing for Women's Studies Majors (WOST 391W) is three-fold: 1) to expose majors in the department to a variety of genres and writing styles important to feminist work; 2) to provide a forum for acquiring and honing writing skills; and 3) to interrogate the importance of language and the written word to feminist studies. Toward these ends, the class will read numerous texts written by women: autobiographical works by Dorothy Allison and Gloria Anzaldùa; the creative, critical narratives of Busejé Bailey, Persimmon Blackbridge, and Jacquelyn Zita; cultural review articles by Susan Bordo and Judith Halberstam; and feminist theorizations of "citizenship" written by scholars from myriad cultural backgrounds and academic fields-Carole Boyce Davies, Lisa Lowe, Carolle Charles, May Joseph, and Barbara Cruikshank. However, the class will also emphasize active, thoughtful writing through a variety of written assignments, both formal and informal. In addition to the formal written assignments for the course-three short papers (5-6 pages) and a final research paper (18-20 pages) on a topic relevant to Women's Studies-the students will also explore the importance of writing through weekly journal writings and class discussions. Underlying the critical objectives for WOST 391W is the belief that writing matters. As tools for the discursive construction of knowledges, words (both textual and corporeal) matter. As instruments of power, words can be either deleterious, exclusive and oppressive, or subversive, inclusive and liberating-or gradations between these extremes. However, the written word-as the spoken word-can also be instrumental in redressing disparities of power and subverting hegemonic modes of discourse (whether phallogocentrism; heterosexism; racism; Eurocentrism; colonialism; or other forms of cultural and political imperialism). Thus, undeniably, for feminists, writing matters.

Why is writing crucial for Women's Studies majors, feminist scholars and political activists?

Writing . . .

Critical Objectives for the course:

II. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

III. COURSE POLICIES

IV. COURSE TEXTS

Available from Atticus Albion Bookstore (Amherst Center): Dorothy Allison, Trash. Firebrand Books, 1988. Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands = la frontera: the new mestiza. Spinsters/Aunt Lute, 1987. Susan Bordo, The Male Body: A New Look at Men in Public and Private. Farrar Strauss Giroux, 1999. Judith Halberstam, Female Masculinity. Duke UP, 1998. Barbara Cruikshank, The Will to Empower: Democratic Citizens and Other Subjects. Cornell UP, 1999. Diana Hacker, ed. A Writer's Reference, 3rd Edition. St. Martin's Press, 1997. Available from Paradise Copies (Northampton): Reader for Junior Year Writing for Women's Studies Majors (WOST 391W).

V. COURSE READER-TABLE OF CONTENTS

Bailey, Busejé. "Opening Up to a lot of Pain," in Collaboration in the Feminine (Barbara Godard, ed.). Toronto: 2nd Story Press, 1994, pp. 256-57. Blackbridge, Persimmon et al., "Doing Time," in Collaboration in the Feminine (Barbara Godard, ed.). Toronto: 2nd Story Press, 1994, pp. 140-47. Charles, Carolle. "Gender and Politics in Contemporary Haiti: The Duvalierist State, Transnationalism, and the Emergence of a New Feminism (1980-1990)," Feminist Studies 21.1 (1995): 135-164. Davies, Carole Boyce. "Migratory Subjectivities," from Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject. New York and London: Routledge, 1993, 1-37. Lowe, Lisa. "Immigration, Citizenship, Racialization: Asian American Critique," from Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1996, pp. 1-36. Joseph, May. "The Performance of Citizenship," from Nomadic Identities: The Performance of Citizenship. University of Minnesota Press, 1999, pp. 1-20. Zita, Jacquelyn N. "A Suite for the Body (in Four Parts)," from Body Talk: Philosophical Reflections on Sex and Gender. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998, pp. 202-208.

VI. COURSE SCHEDULE

General Template for Weekly Schedule (please note exceptions on detailed weekly schedule below): Mondays-Discussion of reading assignments. Wednesdays (odd weeks)-1st draft of written assignments due (turn in 2 copies). Wednesdays (even weeks)-2nd draft of written assignments due (1 copy); Class workshops. Friday-Journals due; Peer Editing workshops (odd wks); discussion of readings (even wks).

Week 1 Introduction to Course-Goals, Objectives, Requirements Wed., Sept. 8: Discuss syllabus: course description, requirements, texts, schedule, policies, expectations. Fri., Sept. 10: Outline various genres of writing-autobiographical paper, creative-critical essay, cultural review article, scholarly research paper; discussion of language, identity and the importance of writing for women; introduction to A Writer's Reference (bring to class with you).

Week 2 Autobiography, Part I: "Reading Trash" Mon., Sept. 13: Discuss stories from Allison's Trash-"Preface," "River of Names." Wed., Sept. 15: CLASS WORKSHOP #1-Auto/Biographical Writing Exercise (In class exercise). Note: Explication of autobiographical paper assignment (bring syllabus to class with you). Fri., Sept. 17: Discuss story from Trash-"The Meanest Woman Ever Left Tennessee"

Week 3 Autobiography, Part II: "Reading more Trash" Mon., Sept. 20: Discuss stories from Trash--"Mama," "Don't tell me . . ." Wed., Sept. 22: Discuss stories from Trash-"The Muscles of the Mind'; and "A Lesbian Appetite." Due: 1st Draft-Autobiographical Essay (5-6 pages). Fri., Sept. 24: PEER EDITING WORKSHOP #1

Week 4 Autobiography, Part III: "Reading the Borderlands" Mon., Sept. 27: Discuss selections of Anzaldúa's Borderlands-Chapters 1 & 2 (pp. 1-24) Wed., Sept. 29: CLASS WORKSHOP #2-Major punctuation errors (fragments, run-ons, comma-splices): G4-G5 in Hacker Note: Explication of creative, critical essay assignment (bring syllabus to class with you). Due: Final Draft-Autobiographical Essay (5-6 pages). Fri., Oct. 1: Discuss selections of Anzaldúa's Borderlands-Chapters 5 & 7 (pp. 53-64, 77-91)

Week 5 Creative, Critical Writing I: "Bodies and Power" I Mon., Oct. 4: Discuss Blackbridge et al., "Doing Time" Wed., Oct. 6: Discuss Zita, "A Suite for the Body (in Four Parts)" Due: 1st Draft-Creative, Critical essay. Fri., Oct. 8: PEER EDITING WORKSHOP #2

Week 6 Creative, Critical Writing II: "Bodies and Power" II Mon., Oct. 11: No Class-Columbus Day; Wed. will follow a Mon. schedule. Wed., Oct. 13: CLASS WORKSHOP #3- Grammatical Sentences : G1-G4 in Hacker Note: Explication of cultural review article assignment (bring syllabus to class with you). Due: 2nd Draft-Creative, Critical essay. Fri., Oct. 15: Discuss Busejé Bailey's "Opening Up"; Presentations-Creative, Critical Essays (extra credit)

MIDTERM STUDENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES BEGIN

Week 7 Cultural Review Articles I: "'Men,' Gender & Masculinity" Mon., Oct. 18: Discuss Bordo's The Male Body: "hard and soft" (36-68) Wed., Oct. 20: Discuss Bordo: "What is a Phallus?" (84-104) Due: 1st Draft-Cultural Review article (5-6 pages). Fri., Oct. 22: PEER EDITING WORKSHOP #3

Week 8 Cultural Review Articles II: "'Men,' Gender, & Masculinity" Mon., Oct. 25: Discuss Bordo: "Gentleman or Beast? The Double Bind of Masculinity" (229-64). Wed., Oct. 27: CLASS WORKSHOP #4- Punctuation: P1-P7 in Hacker, with emphasis on comma usage P1-P2 Note: Explication of abstract assignment (bring syllabus to class with you). Due: 2nd Draft-Cultural Review article (5-6 pages). Fri., Oct. 29: Discuss Bordo: "gay men's revenge" (153-167)

Week 9 Cultural Review Articles III: "'Women,' Gender, & Masculinity" Mon., Nov. 1: Halberstam's Female Masculinity: "An Introduction to Female Masculinity" (1-43). Wed., Nov. 3: Discuss Halberstam: "Transgender Butch: Butch/FTM Border Wars . . ." (141-74) Fri., Nov. 5: RESEARCH SESSION #1: Meet in W.E.B. DuBois Library (Main Floor).

MIDTERM STUDENT-TEACHER CONFERENCES END

Week 10 Cultural Review Articles III: "'Women,' Gender, & Masculinity" Mon., Nov. 8: Discuss Halberstam: "Drag Kings: Masculinity and Performance" (231-266). Wed., Nov. 10: CLASS WORKSHOP #5-MLA Style/APA Style for In-text Citations: M1 & A1-a in Hacker Fri., Nov. 12: RESEARCH SESSION #2: Meet in W.E.B. DuBois Library (Main Floor).

Week 11 Scholarly Research-Feminists Theorize Citizenship I: "Migrants, Subjects, Nations" Mon., Nov. 15: No class-Thursday schedule following Veteran's Day, November 11. Wed., Nov. 17: Discuss Boyce Davies' "Migratory Subjectivities" Due: 1st Draft-Abstract (2-3 pages) of final research paper. Fri., Nov. 19: PEER EDITING WORKSHOP #4

Week 12 Scholarly Research- Feminists Theorize Citizenship II: "Citizenship & Ethnicity" Mon., Nov. 22: Discuss Lowe's "Immigration, Citizenship, Racialization" Wed., Nov. 24: CLASS WORKSHOP #6-MLA Style/APA Style for Bibliographical Citations: M2 & A1-b in Hacker Note: Explication of annotated bibliography & research paper assignments (bring syllabus). Due: 2nd Draft-Abstract (3 pages) of final research paper. Fri., Nov. 26: No Class-Thanksgiving Holiday

Week 13 Scholarly Research- Feminists Theorize Citizenship III: "Trans/nationalism" Mon., Nov. 29: Discuss Carolle Charles' "Gender and Politics in Contemporary Haiti" Wed., Dec. 1: Discuss Joseph's "The Performance of Citizenship" Due: 1st Draft-annotated bibliography (minimum of 5 sources) in APA or MLA style. Fri., Dec. 3: PEER EDITING WORKSHOP #5

Week 14 Scholarly Research- Feminists Theorize Citizenship IV: "Subjects & State Power" Mon., Dec. 6: Discuss Cruikshank's The Will to Empower: "Introduction: Small Things" (pp. 1-18) Wed., Dec. 8: Discuss Cruikshank: "Democratic Subjects" (pp. 19-42) Due: 2nd Draft-annotated bibliography (minimum of 10 sources) in APA or MLA style. Note: Requests for Extensions or Incompletes must be received in writing by 12/8. Fri., Dec. 10 Discuss Cruikshank: "The Will to Empower: Technologies of Citizenship . . ." (pp. 67-86) Due: 1st Draft-research paper (not > 8-10 pages). Note: Remember to submit 2 copies.

PEER EDITING #6 (OUTSIDE OF CLASS): In lieu of "In-class" Peer-Editing, each student will edit another student's draft for 1-hr. outside of class and return the editing notes/comments to both the student and the instructor on 12/13.

Week 15 Scholarly Research- Feminists Theorize Citizenship VI: "Subjects & State Power" Mon., Dec. 13: Last Day of Classes. Cruikshank: "Welfare Queens: Ruling by Number" (pp. 104-21) Due: "Peer Editing Notes" for first draft of research paper. Note: Submit 2 copies.

Week 16 Finals Week Tues., Dec. 21 ¯²¯³± ~ Winter Solstice ~ ±³¯²¯ Due: Writing Portfolio- Final draft of research paper (18-20 pages), including abstract & annotated bibliography; Journal; peer-editing notes; and drafts of all previous papers should be submitted in an orderly, neat presentation for final course grade evaluation.

VII. WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

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