CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE LISTINGS - Spring 2004

Click here for Continuing Ed website and a complete listing of courses. The following list is meant as a guide for those looking for courses with Women's Studies content. We begin with winter courses, click here for the Spring 2004 listing.


WINTERSESSION 2004

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES
(All departmental courses except 100-level automatically count towards the major. Click here to see component courses.)

ENGLISH 132 (ONLINE ) (GEN ED: AL G)
Man and Woman in Literature
Section #1 instructor: Erin White
Section #2 Instructor: Catherine Pavia

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. E-mail instructor for required textbooks. Order books ahead of time to avoid falling behind in coursework. Order books for correct section. Online courses are very popular. Register early, don't wait. Course capacity is limited.

PSYCH 308 (GEN ED: SB U)
sychology of Women MTuWTh 12:30-3:30 p.m. Instructor: Beth Lux A general introduction. Two sections: the issue of sex differences, including evidence for and explanation of such differences; and "Women's issues," topics of particular interest to women in contemporary society (e.g., violence against women, work and achievement). Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology or equivalent.

SOCIOL 106 (GEN ED: SB U)
Race, Gender, Class and Ethnicity MTuWTh 9 a.m.-noon
Instructor: Brian Kapitulik
Introduction to sociology. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to family, occupation, and other aspects of social life.

SOCIOL 387 (GEN ED: SB U)
Sexuality and Society
MTuWTh 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Instructor: Anna Curtis
The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups. Also includes adolescent sexuality; the invention of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; the medicalization of sexuality; and social theories about how people become sexual. SOCIOL 395K (ONLINE) Domestic Violence Instructor: Kevin Warwick
A survey of patterns and trends in domestic violence in contemporary America, including detailed discussion of the factors that cause and reduce it. Topics include the role of family and work-related stresses as triggers in domestic violence, cultural definitions of violence as an acceptable or unacceptable response to anger, gender-related differences in this response, and the individual and social costs of domestic violence. Special attention will be paid to historical changes in American legal definitions of domestic violence and to the resulting changes in the American criminal justice system's responses to it. Textbook: Men's Work by Paul Kivel, Hazelden. Elective course in Criminal Justice Studies Certificate Online Program but is open to all.


COMPONENT
(Students who would like the following courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses count only towards the minor.)

AFROAM 236 (GEN ED: HS U )
History of the Civil Rights Movement
MTuWTh 6-9 p.m.
Instructor: Cristy Tondeur
Examination of the civil rights movement from the Brown v. Topeka decision to the rise of Black power. All the major organizations of the period, e.g., SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League. The impact on the white students and the anti-war movement.

ANTHRO 104 (GEN ED: SB G )
Culture, Society and People
MTuWThF 12:30-3 p.m
Instructor: Thomas Taaffe
The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces.

COMM 121
Introduction to Media and Culture
MTuWTh 4-7 p.m.
Instructor: Alicia Kemmitt
An introduction to the social role of mass media in advanced industrial western societies, focusing on how relationships between mass communications and the surrounding economic framework affect cultural, political, and ideological processes in society. An explanation of social and historical contexts within which newspapers, radio, and television developed and how they are structured with attention to both the domestic and international implications of treating mass media as just another industry. Limited enrollment; register early.

COMP-LIT 131 (GEN ED: AL G )
Brave New World
MTuWThF 9-11:30 a.m.
Instructor: Alissandra Paschkowiak
Utopian and dystopian novels. The ability of literature to generate social critique. Readings include works by Huxley, Orwell, Kafka, Atwood, Burgess, Gibson, Piercy, Gilman, Dick and others.

COMP-LIT 141 (GEN ED: AL G )
Good and Evil: East and West
MTuWThF 12:30-3 p.m.
Instructor: Lan Dong
The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross-cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world.

EDUC 210 (GEN ED: I U)
Social Diversity in Education
TuWTh 4-7 p.m. (1/6-1/21), Sa 9-5 p.m. (1/17), Th 4-8 p.m. (1/22)
Instructor: Solomon Abraham
Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analysis of power and privilege within broad social contexts. Additional meeting from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 17th plus on last day Thurs., Jan. 22nd 4-8 p.m.

LINGUIST 101 (ONLINE) (GEN ED: SB )
People and Their Language
Instructor: John McCarthy
This course looks at human language from two perspectives. One perspective is biological: language is a uniquely human instinct, a part of the human genome. Because language is an instinct, all human languages are, at some deep level, the same. Another, complementary perspective is social: language is an important-perhaps the most important-cultural artiface in any society. With this perspective, we will look at how and why languages and dialects differ, studying language as a force that dynamically shapes and is shaped by history, class, status, ethnicity, gender, and institutions like the media and the law. Throughout, we will also see the interplay of biological and social factors in human language. Instructor John McCarthy is a UMass Amherst faculty member and internationally recognized linguist. He was honored as a Guggenheim Fellow for 1992-93, received the Outstanding Teacher Award for the College of Humanities and Fine Arts in 1995 and has served as President of the Arabic Linguistics Society as well as serving on a number of editorial boards. The required textbook is: Pinker, Steven. 1994. The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language. This book is currently published in a Harper Perennial edition, ISBN 0060958332, available for $10.50 from http://amazon.com It is also frequently available as a used book in the original W. Morrow & Co. edition. The two editions are identical except for pagination. You should also be able to find this book in your local public library, since it was a New York Times nonfiction best seller.

PHIL 164 (ONLINE ) (GEN ED: AT )
Medical Ethics
Instructor: Marcy Lascano
Introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician assisted suicide, truth telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Readings will all be available on the website, so no book will be needed.

SOCIOL 103 (GEN ED: SB U)
Social Problems
MTuWTh 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Instructor: Erika Marquez
Introduction to sociology. The major social problems facing American society today such as crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tension, gender, race, ethnic, and social inequalities, are reviewed contemporarily and historically.


SPRING 2004

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES
(All departmental courses except 100-level automatically count towards the major. Click here to see component courses.)

ANTHRO 397N
Women, Society and Culture in East Africa
Tu 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Elizabeth Mazzocco
Women in East Africa have gone through a lot of changes from colonial to post/modern era. These changes have affected their lives considerably in all aspects. Agriculture is the main activity of people in East Africa and 80% of the work is done by women, in addition to their job as bearers and nurturers of children. However, with the onset of HIV/AIDS, the role of women in agricultural production and other areas needs to be reexamined. The civil wars in some parts of East Africa have led to large numbers of refugees and more women taking the position of heads of families, a role that is predominantly a male prerogative. Despite these problems, women in East Africa identify themselves with the international community in fighting for women's rights. For example: Nairobi, Kenya was the venue of the UN Women's conference in 1985 after Mexico in 1975. The objective of this course is twofold. One, is to sensitize students outside East Africa to appreciate what women in East Africa have to grapple with in their daily lives. Two, to recognize the approaches women in East Africa utilize to contribute for women's rights both locally and globally. Counts towards the women of color outside the U.S. requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

ENGLISH 132 (ONLINE) (GEN ED: AL G)
Man and Woman in Literature
Instructor: Nick Moudry
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may nclude: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. Capacity limited; register early to ensure a space. Reading materials to be purchased: 1) Euripides, The Bacchae; 2) Eileen Myles, Chelsea Girls; 3) William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew; 4) Anne Bronte, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall; 5) Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises; 6) Virginia Wolff, Mrs. Dalloway; 7) Jack Kerouac, On the Road; 8) Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Dictee.

SOCIOL 222 (GEN ED: SB U )
The Family
W 6:30-9:30 p.m.
First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).

WOMENSST 187 (GEN ED: I U )
Introduction to Women's Studies
Tu 6-9 p.m.
Instructor: Kirsten Isgro
Basic concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies, with women's experiences at the center of interpretation. Critical reading and thinking about gender and its interaction with race and class. Focus on women's history and contemporary issues for women.

COMPONENT
(Students who would like the following courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses count only towards the minor.)

ANTHRO 106 (GEN ED: SB G )
Culture Through Film
Tu 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Joannah Whitney
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.

COMM 121
Introduction to Media and Culture
Tu 6-9 p.m.
An introduction to the social role of mass media in advanced industrial western societies, focusing on how relationships between mass communications and the surrounding economic framework affect cultural, political, and ideological processes in society. An explanation of social and historical contexts within which newspapers, radio, and television developed and how they are structured with attention to both the domestic and international implications of treating mass media as just an other industry. Limited enrollment; register early.

COMP-LIT 131 (GEN ED: AL G )
Brave New World
Tu 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Utopian and dystopian novels. The ability of literature to generate social critique. Readings include works by Huxley, Orwell, Kafka, Atwood, Burgess, Gibson, Piercy, Gilman, Dick and others.

EDUC 210 (GEN ED: I U )
Social Diversity in Education
Tu 4-6:30 p.m.
Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analysis of power and privilege within broad social contexts.

PHIL 164 (ONLINE) (GEN ED: AT)
Medical Ethics
Instructor: Kristen Hine
Introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician assisted suicide, truth telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Readings will all be available on the website, so no book will be needed.

SOCIOL 224 (GEN ED: SB U)
Social Class Inequality
M 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Brittnie Aiello
The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.


Program Core Courses
Women of Color Courses
UMass Departmental Courses
UMass Component Courses
Continuing Ed Courses
Graduate Level Courses
Amherst College
Hampshire College
Mount Holyoke College
Smith College
UMass listings
Five-College Listings