CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSE LISTINGS

Click here for Continuing Ed website and a complete listing of courses. The following list is meant as a guide for those looking for courses with Women's Studies content. Spring 2003 courses are now listed, click here to see those with Women's Studies content. Registration began 12/2/02 and classes start Tuesday, January 28.

WINTERSESSION 2003 COURSES
Registration begins November 12th
$150 per credit - courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted
ON-line courses are $200 per credit - no materials fee


DEPARTMENTAL
(All departmental courses except 100-level automatically count towards the major.)

ENGL 132 - Man and Woman in Literature (AL G)
ON-CAMPUS section - Monday through Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Instructor: Dorothea Lasky
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. Textbooks for online section: Ernest Hemingway, "The Garden of Eden" ISBN 0684804522; Virginia Woolf, "To the Lighthouse" ISBN 0156907399; Jean Toomer, "Cane" ISBN 0871401517; Raymond Chandler, "The Big Sleep" ISBN 0394758285; Joan Didion, "Play It As It Lays" ISBN 0374521719.

ONLINE SECTION begins January 2nd - $200 per credit - no materials fee
Instructor: Michael Edwards

PSYCH 308 - Psychology of Women (SB U)
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Prerequisite: Elementary Psychology.
Instructor: Beth Lux
A general introduction. Two sections: the issue of sex differences, including evidence for and explanation of such differences; and "Women's issues," topics of particular interest to women in contemporary society (e.g., violence against women, work and achievement).

SOCIOL 106 - Race, Gender, Class and Ethnicity (SB U)
Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m.-noon
Instructor: Sarah Ford
Introduction to sociology. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to family, occupation, and other aspects of social life.

SOCIOL 222 - The Family (SB U)
Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.-noon
Instructor: Isha Sharma
First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).

SOCIOL 387 - Sexuality and Society (SB U)
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Instructor: Brian Kapitulik
The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups. Also includes adolescent sexuality; the invention of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; the medicalization of sexuality; and social theories about how people become sexual.

SOCIOL 395K - Domestic Violence
Online course
Instructor: Kevin Warwick
A survey of patterns and trends in domestic violence in contemporary America, including detailed discussion of the factors that cause and reduce it. Topics include the role of family and work-related stresses as triggers in domestic violence, cultural definitions of violence as an acceptable or unacceptable response to anger; gender-related differences in this response, and the individual and social costs of domestic violence. Special attention will be paid to historical changes in American legal definitions of domestic violence and to the resulting changes in the American criminal justice system's responses to it.

WOMENSST 187 - Introduction to Women's Studies (I U)
Monday through Thursday 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Instructor: Chizu Sato
Basic concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies, with women's experiences at the center of interpretation. Critical reading and thinking about gender and its interaction with race and class. Focus on women's history and contemporary issues for women.


COMPONENT
(Students who would like the following courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses count only towards the minor.)

AFROAM 151 - Culture and Literature (AL U)
Monday through Thursday 5:00-8:00 p.m.
Relevant forms of Black cultural expressions contributing to the shape and character of contemporary Black culture; the application of these in traditional Black writers. Includes: West African cultural patterns and the Black past; the transition-slavery, the culture of survival; the cultural patterns through literature; and Black perceptions versus white perceptions.

AFROAM 236 - History of the Civil Rights Movement (HS U)
Monday through Thursday 9:00-12:00 p.m.
Examination of the civil rights movement from the Brown v. Topeka decision to the rise of Black power. All the major organizations of the period, e.g., SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League. The impact on the white students and the anti-war movement.

ANTH 104 - Culture, Society and People (SB G)
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.
Instructor: Jennifer Foster
Exploration of the different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.

COMM 121 - Introduction to Media and Culture
Monday through Thursday 4:00-7:00 p.m.
Instructor: Lynn Comella
An introduction to the social role of mass media in advanced industrial western societies, focusing on how relationships between mass communications and the surrounding economic framework affect cultural, political, and ideological processes in society. An explanation of social and historical contexts within which newspapers, radio, and television developed and how they are structured with attention to both the domestic and international implications of treating mass media as just another industry.

COMM 226 - Social Impact of Mass Media
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.
Instructor: Andrea Bergstrom
The correlates, consequences, and functions of mass communication from a variety of traditional and contemporary perspectives. Theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches that have been applied to the field; emphasis on how institutions, technology, messages, and audiences contribute to the social and cultural impact of the mass communication process.

COMP-LIT 122 - Spiritual Autobiography (AL G)
Monday through Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Instructor: Chris Michalski
Exploration of the individual psyche, growth of self-consciousness; the dark night of the soul and the role of suffering in personal growth. Reading from a variety of spiritual diaries, autobiographies, from East and West, written by women and men, believers and heretics. Ancient and modern examples.

COMP-LIT 141 - Good and Evil: East and West (AL G)
Monday through Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Instructor: Alissandra Paschkowiak
The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross-cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world. Contemporary issues of nuclear war, holocaust, AIDS, abortion, marginal persons, anawim, and unwanted children.

EDUC 210 - Social Diversity in Education (IU)
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 4:00-7:00 p.m. (1/7-1/23)
SA (1/18) 9 a.m.-5 p.m. + Th (1/23) 4-8 p.m.
Instructor: Christopher Lester
Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analysis of power and privilege within broad social contexts.

ENGLISH 115 - The American Experience (AL U)
Monday through Friday, 12:30-3 p.m.
Instructor: Ben Balthaser
Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture, with a wide historical scope and attention to diverse cultural experiences in the U.S. Readings in fiction, prose, and poetry, supplemented by painting, photography, film, and material culture.

PHIL 164 - Medical Ethics (AT)
ONLINE
Instructor: Brian Kiniry
Introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion, euthanasia, truth telling, medical experimentation, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

SOCIOL 103 - Social Problems (SB U)
Instructor: Brittnie Aiello
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Introduction to sociology. The major social problems facing American society today such as crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tension, gender, race, ethnic, and social inequalities, are reviewed contemporarily and historically.


SPRING 2003 COURSES
Registration began December 2, 2002
Classes begin Tuesday, January 28
Courses are 3 credits - $150 per credit
$200 per credit for online courses unless otherwise noted

DEPARTMENTAL
(All departmental courses except 100-level automatically count towards the major.)

ENGLISH 132
Man and Woman in Literature (AL G)
Thursday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor:
Michael Mattison
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.

SOCIOL 106
Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity (SB U)
Wednesday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Afshan Jafar
Introduction to sociology. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to family, occupation, and other aspects of social life.

SOCIOL 222
The Family (SB U)
Wednesday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Joshua Carriero
First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).

SOCIOL 395K- ONLINE COURSE!
Domestic Violence
Online course begins 1/28, last day to register is 1/24.
Instructor: Kevin Warwick
A survey of patterns and trends in domestic violence in contemporary America, including detailed discussion of the factors that cause and reduce it. Topics include the role of family and work-related stresses as triggers in domestic violence, cultural definitions of violence as an acceptable or unacceptable response to anger; gender-related differences in this response, and the individual and social costs of domestic violence. Special attention will be paid to historical changes in American legal definitions of domestic violence and to the resulting changes in the American criminal justice system's responses to it. No infrastructure fee, no materials fee.

WOST 187
Introduction to Women's Studies (I U)
Monday 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Instructor: Viera Wallace-Lorencova
Basic Concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies, with women's experiences at the center of interpretation. Critical reading and thinking about gender and its interaction with race and class. Focus on women's history and contemporary issues for women.


COMPONENT
(Students who would like the following courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses count only towards the minor.)

ANTHRO 106
Culture Through Film (SB G)
Thursday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change.

ANTHRO 397E
Health, Healing, and Alternative Medicine
Tuesday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Examine the growing trend of alternative medicine in North America from a critical, anthropological perspective. Focus will be to place this popular phenomenon within the contexts of culture, class, gender, ethnicity, and history. Look at alternative therapies and how they are integrated and appropriated within biomedical institutions, with a particular concern with how this synthesis of healing modalities affects health care. This course is designed for upper-level undergraduates with an interest in anthropology, health, medicine, and popular culture.

COMM 226
Social Impact of Mass Media
Thursday 6:00-9:00 p.m.
The correlates, consequences, and functions of mass communication from a variety of traditional and contemporary perspectives. Theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches that have been applied to the field; emphasis on how institutions, technology, messages, and audiences contribute to the social and cultural impact of the mass communication process.

COMP-LIT 131
Brave New Worlds (AL G)
Monday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Utopian and dystopian novels. The ability of literature to generate social critique. Readings include works by Huxley, Orwell, Kafka, Atwood, Burgess, Gibson, Piercy, Gilman, Dick, and others.

COMP-LIT 141
Good and Evil: East and West (AL G)
Thursday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross-cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world. Contemporary issues of nuclear war, holocaust, AIDS, abortion, marginal persons, anawim, unwanted children.

EDUC 210
Social Diversity in Education (I U)
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Instructor: Christopher Lester
Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analysis of power and privilege within broad social contexts

NURSING 490N- ONLINE COURSE!
Nursing Process: Families
Online, course begins 1/28, last day to register is 1/24.
Instructor: Margo Drohan
This course provides the exploration of theoretical foundations for the understanding of family theory as it relates to health and illness. We will examine the promotion of health, restoration, and rehabilitation within traditional and non-traditional families across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the RN/BS Program, NURSING 440, Comprehensive Nursing (Vulnerable Populations). $265 per credit, no infrastructure fee, no materials fee.

PHIL 164- ONLINE COURSE!
Medical Ethics (AT)
Online, course begins 1/28, last day to register is 1/24.
Instructor: Brian Kiniry
Introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion, euthanasia, truth-telling, medical experimentation, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. No infrastructure fee, no materials fee.

SOCIOL 224
Social Class Inequality (SB U)
Monday 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Instructor: Ingrid Semaan
The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why Stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.

The following Sociology course, SOCIOL 481 is part of the UWW-DMR program. Only UWW DMH or DMR students can register for this course.

SOCIOL 481
Sociology of Mental Health
Tuesday 6:30-9:00 p.m.
Instructor: Brian Kapitulik
A critical look at mental health and illness. Topics to include: definitions, social distribution, theories of causation, diagnosis, treatment planning and policy issues. Special attention will be placed on the intersections of race, class, gender, sexualities and ethnicity as they relate to the field. $200 per credit.


Program Core Courses
Women of Color Courses
UMass Departmental Courses
UMass Component Courses
Continuing Ed Courses
Graduate Level Courses
Amherst College
Hampshire College
Mount Holyoke College
Smith College
UMass listings
Five-College Listings