Anthropology
Community Health
Commnications
Comparative Literature
Consumer Studies
Economics
Education
English
History
Judaic Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

ANTHRO 397B Gender and Post-Socialist Transformations
Monday, Wednesday 12:20-1:35 p.m.
Julie Hemment

In this course we will examine the transforming states of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union from the perspective of gender. The so-called "collapse of Communism" in the late 1980s paved the way for ambitious projects for social and political change. However, policies aimed at democratization and economic liberalization led to increased stratification and impoverishment. Women have borne the brunt of many of these changes. Bringing together ethnographic and theoretical accounts of the former East bloc, this course examines the gender realignments of the post-socialist period and women's responses to these changes. Themes to be discussed will include: Gender and socialism (the socialist "gender regime" and the meaning of work, home, family); women and the market; "civil society" and violence against women; and women's activism (NGOs, feminism and transnational social movements). As we read about the context of the former East bloc, we will think of ways to bring these insights "home". What do we learn about our own society? How does the post-socialist case challenge our notions of community, family, the state, capitalism, justice and democracy?

ANTHRO 397D Gender and Sexuality
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jackie Urla

See Department for description.

COMM 593C Film/Video & Gender
Monday 6:00-9:00 p.m.
A. Ciecko

This course will examine representations of gender and cultural boundary-crossings in film and video. There will be a special focus on (mostly contemporary) experimental, documentary, and fiction shorts and features about personal experiences of diaspora and exile, memory and nostalgia, and intercultural encounters. Short work and clips will be screened in class each week, but students will also be responsible for watching films outside of class on a regular basis. Readings for the course will include recent books by film scholars Hamid Naficy (An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking) and Laura Marks (The Skin of the Film: Intercultural Cinema, Embodiment, and the Senses); as well as diverse essays informed by cultural studies, postcolonial theory, feminist/gender studies, queer theory, and media criticism/theory.

COMHL 213 Peer Health Educ.I
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 p.m. (contact instructor to add course)
Collings

Training course. Students participate in campus outreach projects while learning specific information on the primary health issues for college students: alcohol and other drug use, sexual decision-making, contraception, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, eating disorders and stress management techniques. Class involves personal health assessment such as personal alcohol and drug survey, small group discussions, guest lectures, role playing, team building and public speaking exercises. Class size limited to 20. Students must complete an application and process for admission to the Peer Health Education Program. This course is the first course in a year long academic course.

COMHL 214 Peer Health Educ.II
Wednesday 4:00-6:30 p.m. (contact instructor to add course)
Sally Linowski

Utilizing the skills and information from EDUC/ComHl 213, students are prepared to conduct educational programs in the residence halls and Greek areas. Significant group facilitation, workshop presentation and health education program planning training. Campus outreach projects include World AIDS Day, Safe Spring Break, Designated Driver, and Safe Sex Campaigns. Advanced peers serve as mentors to the first semester peer health educators, and may elect to continue in the program through independent study credits. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: EDUC/ComHl 213.

COMLIT 204 Woman, Man, and Myth: The Female Hero (AL)
Monday, Wednesday 3:35-5:00 p.m.
A. Paschkowiak

This course will examine the representations of women warriors that proliferate in Europe and Asia during the Middle Ages. Although we will first situate the Amazon figure in her classical context, we will engage primarily with medieval texts and images that construct the myth of the female hero. This class will explore how myths of the female hero are reconstructed in popular culture, especially in fantasy literature and contemporary action cinema. We will consider how issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class further complicate this troubled, yet nonetheless popular, figure in literature, art, and film. As a contrast to the fighting woman, we will discuss the construction of the male hero, as well as more traditional models of femininity. Requirements for the class could include 2 short essays, a midterm, an oral presentation, and a final project (chosen from several creative or traditional options). This is a heavy reading course. All students with prior academic writing experience are welcome.

CONS 155 Dress and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15-12:30 p.m.
Susan Michelman

Dress and culture examined from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective focusing on diversity and social change. Discussion of sociocultural perspective focusing on diversity and social change. Discussion of sociocultural meaning of dress in European, African, North and South American, Pacific, and Asian cultures. Course objectives are to understand how dress is a form of non-verbal communication and its sociocultural importance in diverse cultural settings. To learn the importance of dress as a vehicle by which various identities (cultural, gender, personal), roles (gender, social, status, etc.), values (personal, cultural), and attitudes are identified and expressed. To gain an appreciation of cultural diversity as it is expressed through physical appearance.

ECON 348/ WOST 391E
Political Economy of Women
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
Lisa Saunders

Uses a wide range of women's issues to teach varied economic principles and theories. Popular women's topics in past semesters include women's increasing labor force participation; gender differences in hiring, promotions, and earnings; the growing poverty rate for female headed households; trade policy effects on women in the US and other countries; and race and class differences in the economic opportunities of women. Empirical assessment of women's work in the market and in the home in the US and other countries. Reconsideration of traditional issues of political economy, comparative economic history, and labor economics.

ECON 397C Sexuality and Economics
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15-12:30 p.m.
Lee Badgett

Economic theory used to explore dimensions of inequality related to sexual orientation and topics such as fertility, abortion, and other state regulation of sexuality.

EDUC 392E Sexism (1 credit)
Mandatory mtg. 2/7/02, 6-10 p.m.
One weekend 9am-5pm, 3/30/02-3/31/02
Barbara Love

ENGL 132 Man and Woman in Literature (ALD)
Lecture 1 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 a.m.
Lecture 2 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 a.m.
Lecture 3 Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 a.m.
xxxxxx
Mitch Boucher
Claire Schomp
TBA

ENGL 132H/ ENGL 132W Man and Women in Literature
Lecture 1 Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 p.m.
Lecture 1 Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 p.m.
xxxxx
Arlyn Diamond
Ismet Ozkilic

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include the nature of love, the image of the hero and of the heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. 100 level courses do not count toward Women's Studies major.

HIST 389 US Women's History Since 1890
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 a.m.
V. Wilson

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American women's lives since 1890, and explores women's participation in and responses to those changes. Topics include: transformation of work and family life, women's culture, the emergence of the feminist movement, sexuality and women's health.

HIST 397D Women in Colonial Africa
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:15 p.m.
J. Bowman

This seminar will examine African women during the colonial period. We will read historical essays, novels, as well as short stories. The major themes that we will discuss will include: the impact of colonialism, Christianity, western education, urbanization and other forces of "modernization." We will also discuss some of the most pressing issues facing African women today. Our examination will focus on women in several countries including Nigeria, Senegal, Kenya and South Africa. Fulfills Women of Color requirement for Women's studies outside the U.S. for majors and minors.

JUDAIC 391D Women, Gender, Judaism
Wednesday 12:20-3:20 p.m.
S. Shapiro

This course examines the ways in which the categories "woman/man,""feminine/masculine" and "gender" differently construe the character of Judaism. "Judaism" is here understood in religious, cultural and social terms. This is not a course that focuses primarily on questioning contemporary forms of Jewish women's identities, nor on filling-in the blanks of the "missing women" of Jewish history and tradition, although some attention will be paid to these matters. Rather, our main focus will be on historical constructions of women's gender roles and identities in Judaism and their cultural and social consequences. Three types of literature, therefore, will be important in this course: (1) primary religious texts about women and gender in Judaism; (2) interpretations and historical accounts of different periods and aspects of women's (and men's) gender roles in Judaism and Jewish culture; (3) current critical, feminist theories of discourse, culture and politics through which to problematize our readings of both primary and interpretative texts.

JUDAIC 395A Family & Sexuality in Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:15 p.m.
J. Berkovitz

An examination of transformations in the Jewish family and attitudes toward sexuality in Judaism, from antiquity to the present. Topics include love, sexuality, and desire in the Bible and Talmud; marriage and divorce through the ages; position and treatment of children; sexuality and spirituality in the Kabbalah; sexual stereotypes in American Jewish culture and Israeli society. Interdisciplinary readings draw on biblical and rabbinic literature, comparative Christian and Islamic sources, historical and scientific research on family and sexuality, and contemporary fiction.

POLSCI 291C Cultural Theory & Politics
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Barbara Cruikshank

Approaches the traditional topics of political inquiry: (freedom, power, conflict and change, equality) in the domain of culture. The politicization of culture (culture wars, sex wars, English-only, to name a few) comes out of the political commitments of both the left and the right. At the same time that cultural conflicts are proliferating, our ability to subject cultural conflict to political solutions is questionable. Culture will be treated as a domain of politics and power, a domain constituted by politics and power, even though it is a domain resistant to deliberate political reform. Will examine how the location and conceptualization of politics itself is transfigured into cultural politics (e.g., "family values" policy, "politics of representation," "culture of poverty").

POLSCI 375 Feminist Theory
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15-12:30 p.m.
Barbara Cruikshank

A theoretical consideration of the varieties of feminism (liberal feminism, socialist-feminism, anarcha-feminism, radical feminism, eco-feminism). Also examines the relation between feminist theory and practice, the historical development of feminism and political theory, and current feminist issues.

PSYCH 308 Psychology of Women (SBD)
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
R. Janoff-Bulman

The female experience as viewed from the perspective of psychology. (1)Processes and experiences through which girls are socialized into the female role in childhood and adolescence. (2)The issue of gender differences in personality characteristics, interests, abilities and behavior. (3)Central experiences in girls' and women's lives, including issues relating to sexuality, mothering, school and work roles, mental health and violence against women.

SOCIOL 106 Race, Gender and Social Class (SBD)
1A - Monday, Wednesday 1:25 p.m. plus Friday discussion
2N - Tuesday, Thursday 11:15-12:30 p.m. plus Friday discussion
TBA

Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, ethnicity, gender and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to employment, education, the criminal justice system, family, and public policy.

SOCIOL 222 The Family (SBD)
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 a.m.
Naomi Gerstel

Using lectures and discussion groups, we will explore how we define family, the ways we construct families, and the relationship between our families and larger social forces. Beginning with an examination of the history of families, we will look at changes in seemingly impersonal forces that are associated with changes in personal relations--between partners and spouses, between parents and children, among extended kin. Turning to the contemporary families, we examine marriage and kinship in all their modern diversity--with special attention to variations associated with race, class, gender and sexual orientation, then turn to those social conditions that shape parenting both from the perspective of mothers, fathers and children and end by coming full circle to look at the social conditions of "uncoupling"- of the separated, divorced, and widowed.

SOC 383 Gender and Society
Monday, Wednesday 3:35-4:50 p.m.
M. Budig

Using lectures and discussion groups, we will explore how we define family, the ways we construct families, and the relationship between our families and larger social forces. Beginning with an examination of the history of families, we will look at changes in seemingly impersonal forces that are associated with changes in personal relations--between partners and spouses, between parents and children, among extended kin. Turning to the contemporary families, we examine marriage and kinship in all their modern diversity--with special attention to variations associated with race, class, gender and sexual orientation, then turn to those social conditions that shape parenting both from the perspective of mothers, fathers and children and end by coming full circle to look at the social conditions of "uncoupling"- of the separated, divorced, and widowed.

SOC 383 Gender and Society
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Gerstel

This course will explore gender difference and gender inequality. To examine their creation, maintenance, and outcomes, we will examine some historical and cross-culture material, but we will focus on the US contemporary experience by examining 1) the creation of gender difference and inequality through the young body, early socialization, education, language, and the media; and 2) the maintenance of gender difference and inequality among adults through the work and the economy as well as intimacy and violence, sexuality and the family. Finally, we will turn to movements for change on both the left and the right. Requirements: Examinations on readings and lectures will be on March 31 and during exam week. Class participation is expected of all students.

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