Registration begins November 6th - Classes run from January 2-25, 2001

The following course list is not a complete list of courses offered by the Continuing Education Program at UMass for Wintersession 2001. This is meant as a guide to show those particular courses that have Women's Studies content. Contact Continuing Education at 545-0530 for more information.

DEPARTMENTAL
(All departmental courses except 100-level automatically count towards the major. Click here to see Component Courses

WOST 187
INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES (I D)
Monday through Friday, 9:00-11:30 a.m.

Basic concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies, with women's experiences at the center of interpretation. Critical reading and thinking about gender and its interaction with race and class. Focus on women's history and contemporary issues for women. 3 credits.

ENGL 132
MAN AND WOMAN IN LITERATURE (AL D)
Monday through Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Patricia Matthew

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include the nature of love; the image of the hero and heroine; and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. 3 credits.

HIST 388
U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY TO 1890 (HS D)
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American women's lives from the colonial period to 1890, and explores women's participation in and responses to those changes. Topics include the transformation of work and family life, women's culture, the emergence of the feminist movement, sexuality and women's health, race and ethnic issues. 3 credits.

PSYCH 308
PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN (SB D)
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Juli Jones

A general introduction. Two sections: the issue of sex differences, evidence for and explanation of such differences; and "women's issues," topics of particular interest to women in society (e.g., violence against women, work and achievement). Prerequisite: Elementary Psychology. 3 credits.

SOCIOL 106
RACE, GENDER, AND CLASS ETHNICITY (SB D)
Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon

Introduction to sociology. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to family, occupation, and other aspects of social life. 3 credits.

SOCIOL 222
THE FAMILY (SB D)
Monday through Thursday 9:00-12:00 noon

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). 3 credits.

SOCIOL 387
SEXUALITY AND SOCIETY (SB D)
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups. Also includes adolescent sexuality; the invention of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; the medicalization of sexuality; and social theories about how people become sexual. 3 credits.


COMPONENT
(Students who would like the following courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses count only towards the minor.)

AFROAM 151 PM
CULTURE AND LITERATURE (AL D)
Monday through Thursay 6:00-9:00 p.m.

Relevant forms of Black cultural expressions contributing to the shape and character of comtemporary Black culture; the application of these in traditional Black writers. Includes West African cultural patterns and the Black past; the transition slavery, the culture of survival; the cultural patterns through literature; and Black perceptions versus white perceptions. 3 credits.

ANTH 104
CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND PEOPLE (SB D)
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.
Nancy Muller

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces. 3 credits.

COMLIT 122
SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY (AL D)
Monday through Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m.

Exploration of the individual psyche, growth of self-consciousness; the dark night of the soul and the role of suffering in personal growth. Reading from a variety of spiritual diaries, autobiographies, from East and West, written by women and men, believers and heretics. Ancient modern examples. 3 credits.

COMLIT 141
GOOD & EVIL, EAST & WEST (AL D)
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.

The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross-cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world. Contemporary issues of nuclear war, holocaust, AIDS, abortion, marginal persons, anawim, unwanted children. 3 credits.

ENGL 115
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (AL D)
Monday through Friday 12:30-3:00 p.m.
Jennifer Digrazia

Selected aspects of American literature, thought and culture. Persons, places, or issues vary; emphasis on the roots of American character and experience and on what is inescapably American about our people, our ideas, and the products of our imagination. Primarily for nonmajors. 3 credits.

HIST 111
THE WORLD AND THE RISING WEST, 1450-PRESENT (HS D)
Monday through Friday 9:00-11:00 a.m.

In a period of intensifying globalization, a basic understanding of our world is becoming increasingly important. The main purpose of this course is to expose students to the global processes that have shaped our modern world since the West began to gradually obtain a dominant global position. Yet, despite the dominance of the West, the world remained a very diverse place. Moving beyond a Eurocentric focus, this course will also help students to develop a topical, chronological, and geographical understanding of world history and cultures. The course will provide insights into various economic, cultural, political, ideological, religious, and social systems. It will furnish an ideal background for people interested in history, economics, business, international law and politics, or anyone curious to learn more about world cultures and the forces that have shaped them. 3 credits.

SOCIOL 103
SOCIAL PROBLEMS (SB D)
Monday through Thursday 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Introduction to sociology. The major social problems facing American society today, such as crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tension, gender, race, ethnic, and social inequalities, are reviewed contemporarily and historically. 3 credits.

Program Core Courses
Women of Color Courses
UMass Departmental Courses
UMass Component Courses
Continuing Ed Courses
Graduate Level Courses
Amherst College Courses
Hampshire College Courses
Mt. Holyoke College Courses
Smith College Courses
UMass Listings
Five-College Catalog