WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM
DEPARTMENTAL COURSES
SPRING 1997

Womens Studies Core Courses | Component Courses | Women of Color Courses
Graduate Level Courses | Amherst College Courses | Hampshire College Courses
Mount Holyoke College Courses | Smith College Courses | Women's Studies Home Page

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES
325 NEW AFRICA HOUSE
545-2751

AFROAM 326
Black Women: Slavery to Present (HSD)
John Bracey
Monday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Lecture, discussion. This course will introduce the history of African American women from the experience of slavery to the present. We will pay particular attention to the ways that racist institutions and practices affected women because of their gender. We also will examine the ways that they organized themselves to address the needs of African Americans in general and of African American women in particular. The course will acquaint you with the achievements of such leaders as Mary Church Terrell, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, and Mary McLeod Bethune as well as those lesser known women. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT
215 MACHMER HALL
545-2221

ANTH 597E
Natalism and Antinatalism
John Cole
Tuesday 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

This class is about the political economy of reproduction. It begins with an examination of the abortion controversy in the United States. It asks about people's attitudes toward abortion and the ideological, social, political and economic issues that swirl around it. These same issues are then explored in other societies, including European, Japanese, Chinese and Third World cases. The inquiry also broadens to examine issues of fertility, population growth, and gender and age relations. All this will be put into the context of development and ecological problems.

ART HISTORY DEPARTMENT
317B BARTLETT HALL
545-3595

ARTHIS 584
Great Themes: Women and Contemporary Art
Anne Mochon
Monday 2:30 - 5:15 pm

See department for course description.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE DEPARTMENT
303 SOUTH COLLEGE
545-0929

COMLIT 793A
Freudian Interpretation: Freudian Women
Jennifer Stone
Tuesday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

This course is open to undergraduates. The course will examine Freud's theories of sexuality and will pose the question of whether it is possible for women/men to subscribe to them today. We shall read the records of women analyzed by Freud in order to assess the value of an orthodox psychoanalysis. A study will be made of the way these writers later develop psychoanalytic theory. Through close readings of papers on psychoanalytic technique, we will begin to understand the aetiology or process of formation of neuroses and perversions. With an understanding which arises out of a clinical context, the course will critique misreadings of psychoanalysis in contemporary literary, film, and feminist theory. Writers to be studied include: Marie Bonaparte, Helen Deutsch, H.D. [Hilda Doolittle], Anna Freud, Jeanne Lampl de Groot, Lou Andreas Salome, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Derrida & Jacques Lacan; Alan Bass, Gilles Deleuze, Louise Kaplan, Juliet Mitchell, Julia Kristeva & Samuel Weber. Literary readings include: H.D., Dostoyevski, Duras, Lampedusa, Landolfi, Stevens, Flaubert & Masoch, and Alice Walker.

COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT
407 MACHMER HALL
545-1311

COMM 794Q
Seminar: Feminist Discourse
Sally Freeman
Monday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

See department for course description.

CONSUMER STUDIES DEPARTMENT
101 SKINNER HALL
545-2391

CS 470 Family Policy: Issues and Implications
Maureen Perry-Jenkins
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

See department for course description.

CS 597B
Special Topics: Images of Women
Pat Warner
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

See department for course description.

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
1004 THOMPSON HALL
545-0855

ECON 348/WOST 391E
Political Economy of Women
Lisa Saunders
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Empirical assessment of women's work in the market and in the home in the US and other countries. Reconsideration of traditional issues of political economy, comparative economic history, and labor economics. Requirements: two midterm exams and one paper. [This course is also cross-listed as WOST 391E.]

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
124 FURCOLO HALL
545-0233

EDUC 210
Social Diversity in Education (ID)
Maurianne Adams

Residential Education course. Check registration guide for locations and course meeting times. Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.

EDUC 213/COMHI 213
Peer Health Education I
Gloria DiFulvio
Wednesday 2:00 - 4:30 pm

Training course. Students participate in campus outreach projects while learning specific information on the primary health issues for college students: alcohol and other drug use, sexual decision-making, contraception, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, eating disorders and stress management techniques. Class involves personal health assessment such as personal alcohol and drug survey, small group discussions, guest lectures, role playing, team building and public speaking exercises. Class size limited to 20. Students must complete an application and interview process for admission to the Peer Health Education Program. This course is the first course in a year-long academic course.

EDUC 214/COMHI 214
Peer Health Education II
Sally Damon
Thursday 1:00 - 3:30 pm

Utilizing skills and information from EDUC/ComHl 213, students are prepared to conduct educational programs in the residence halls and Greek areas. Significant group facilitation, workshop presentation and health education program planning training. Campus outreach projects include World AIDS Day, Safe Spring Break, Designated Driver, and Safer Sex Campaigns. Advanced peers serve as mentors to the first semester peer health educations, and may elect to continue in the program through independent study credits. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: EDUC/ComHl 213.

There is a mandatory organizational meeting for ALL of the following social issues courses on THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, from 7:00 - 9:30 pm in the Campus Center Auditorium. Students will not be admitted to the courses if they do not attend this session.

Weekend Session Dates EDUC 392D/Racism (1 credit)/4/12 and 4/13. EDUC 392E/Sexism (1 credit)/4/26 and 4/27. EDUC 392F/Jewish Oppression (1 credit)/4/5 and 4/6. EDUC 392G/Ableism (1 credit)/2/22 and 2/23. EDUC 392K/Classism (1 credit)/3/1 and 3/2. EDUC 392L/Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual Oppression (1 credit)/3/8 and 3/9

EDUC 395L
Peer Education/Sexual Harassment
Craig Alimo and Diana Fordham
Tuesday, Thursday 3:00 - 4:30 pm

See department for course description.

EDUC 395Z
Talking Across Differences
Zuniga/Griffin
Thursdays (2/20; 2/27; 3/13; 3/27; 4/3; 4/10) (three hour classes)
Fridays (3/7 and 4/18) (six hour classes)

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of difference, dominance, conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding and the building of bridges between social groups. In this course, students will participate in a semi-structured face-to-face meeting with students from at least two different social identity groups and explore their own and the other groupís experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Students will examine narratives, historical and sociological materials which address each groupís experience within a US context, and learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue inquiry and exploration. A second goal is to actively identify actions and coalitional efforts to bring about just and peaceful resolutions to intergroup conflicts.

EDUC 697A
Women and Higher Education
Jana Nidiffer
Tuesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Women now comprise a majority of all American undergraduate students, but only a minority of senior professors, senior administrators, or presidents. This course is an introduction to the issues affecting women in the academy as students, teachers, leaders, and scholars. Some of the topics include: barriers to women's full participation in higher education, including sexual harassment and racism; the question of coeducation versus single-sex education; conditions for women undergraduates including the so-called "chilly climate." In addition, the course will explore issues germane to female faculty members, barriers to institutional leadership, and the goals and contributions of women's studies as well as the current attack on feminist scholarship. The class will be run as a seminar and students (acting in small groups) will be required to offer one class session on a topic of interest to the class.

EDUC 752
Gender Issues in International Development
David Evans
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

Impact of national economic and social development on women's roles and status, especially in Third World countries. Analysis of educational strategies for promoting equal participation of women in this process.

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
170 BARTLETT HALL
545-2332

ENGL 132
Man and Woman in Literature (ALD)
staff
9 sections: check Schedule of Courses

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include the nature of love, the image of the hero and of the heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. Nine sections (including residential program sections), so please check Schedule of Courses. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

ENGL 480
American Women's Autobiography
Margo Culley
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

A selection of readings from the rich body of women's autobiographical writing, with emphasis on American texts. Analysis of particular works in the contexts of traditions of autobiographical writing and theory of gender construction and subjectivity. Readings: Mary McCarthy, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood; Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Jill Ker Conway, The Road from Coorain; Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation; Terry Tempest Williams, Refuge; Lorene Carey, Black Ice. Frequent short papers, some autobiographical writing (optional). Prerequisite: English 112 or equivalent.

ENGL 491A
The Body in Revolutionary Writing
Christine Cooper
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:00 pm

Investigation of the intersections between writing about revolution (or counterrevolution) and representations of the body. Focusing on the contexts of the American, French, and Industrial Revolutions as experienced and imagined primarily by Anglo-American writers, we will consider the roles the body plays materially and metaphorically in the conception of revolutionary principles and ideals. What might it mean for a body to come to illustrate abstract concepts or principles like Liberty, Freedom, Labor, or Equality? How do specific bodies, especially women's bodies, come to stand for ideas like the nation and what happens to notions of the body under the conditions of different revolutionary discourses. How does class relate to gender in the figurings of capitalism; how does gender relate to the struggle against forms of absolute power; how does revolution transform when different bodies occupy the place to the individuals struggling for change? To what extent, finally, does revolution look different on different bodies, or do bodies determine the extent/look/configurations of revolution itself? Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or equivalent.

ENGL 491D
Modernist Women Writers
Laura Doyle
Thursday 10:00 am - 12:30 pm

This course offers the opportunity to read many of the important and sometimes overlooked women writers of the early twentieth century in the US and Britain. Between 1900 and 1940, authors such as Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Virginia Woolf, and Mina Loy played formative roles in the experiments of modernism. When attention is given to women's as well as men's modernist writing, how does our picture of the period change? How do the authors' interests in private subjectivity and social identify shape their literary innvoations? Why did modernist writing emerge when it did? These and other questions will engage us as we read the literature with attention to theme, form, and social context. We will study a few men's texts in conjunction with the women's. Restricted to English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or equivalent.

HISTORY DEPARTMENT
612 HERTER HALL
545-1330

HIST 389
U.S. Women's History, 20th Century (HSD)
Joyce Berkman
Tuesday, Thursday 1:25 - 2:15 pm, plus discussion

Lecture. US women's experience 1890 to the present, exploring female consciousness and relationships, customs, attitudes, and policies, laws concerning women's place, social class, ethnicity, race, religion, regionality, sexual preference. Course journal. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher.

HIST 491B
Women in Africa
Joye Bowman
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:45 pm

Introduction to women in twentieth century Africa. Major themes include: the impact of colonialism, Christianity, western education, urbanization and other forces of "modernization." and how African women have dealt with these forces of change in a number of countries including Nigeria, Senegal, Algeria, Zimbabwe, Kenya and South Africa. Readings include historical essays, novels, short stories. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

HIST 591B
US and European Women in the two World Wars
Joyce Berkman
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Seminar. How did the First and Second World War affect the lives of women and how did women shape their own and male wartime experience at home and war fronts? How did a woman's social class, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, sexuality, and political values differentiate her wartime circumstances, thoughts, and actions from women unlike herself? These questions and many more will act as pivots for class readings, discussions and writing projects. In our inquiry we will examine an array of disciplinary sources for information and insight. In addition, the course will address issues of historical methodology, e.g. oral history, and focus on the craft of writing. Students will write two drafts of a 5-7 page paper that analyzes assigned readings as well as complete two drafts of a longer 12- 15 paged term paper/project.

JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT
108 BARTLETT HALL
545-1376

JOURN 395A/WOST 395A
Women and Men in Journalism
Karen List
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

This course looks at issues surrounding the participation and portrayal of women in American journalism from colonial to contemporary times. It will focus on women journalists and the obstacles they have faced as well as on coverage of women from the 18th century through today, largely in the context of the news/editorial aspect of newspapers, magazines, and broadcasting. [This course is also cross-listed as WOST 395A]

JUDAIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES
744 HERTER HALL
545-2550

JUDAIC 392B
Women in Jewish History
Ruth Abrams
Wednesday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

Lecture. A survey of some recent works on Jewish women, analyzing them in terms of historiographic approaches. Primary focus on women as historical actors. Special attention to how acknowledging women's experiences might change traditional periodizations of Jewish history. Emphasis on how historians have used methods from other disciplines to uncover the role of women. Students are encouraged to compare works on the roles of women in Jewish history to works on women in other specific subject areas.

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT
Chenoweth Laboratory
545-0740

NUTR 397
Special Topics: Eating Disorders - An interdisciplinary perspective
Robin Levine, R.D.

This course provides information about and offers an understanding of eating disorders, a growing public health problem. Despite the overwhelming research indicating the long-term ineffectiveness of most weight loss programs, these industries abound and flourish. In an attempt to lose weight, individuals risk inadequate energy intake, malnutrition, loss of lean tissue, reduced peak bone mass, increased bone fractures, and the development of eating disorders. This course will also cover why and how eati ng disorders have spread beyond the stereotype of white adolescent and young adult middle and upper-class females and into the everyday lives of young and prepubescent girls, African-American, Asian and Latina females, athletes, and older women. Informat ion will e provided on the short and long term personal and public health concerns involved when growing numbers of females diet, binge, starve, restrict fat and/or calories, over-exercise, and generally become preoccupied with their weight and body shape . Also, the role society and the media play in precipitating eating disorders will be covered and the sociological and psychological perspectives on weight control behaviors will be addressed.

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT
352 BARTLETT HALL
545-2330

PHIL 394G/WOST 394G
Philosophy of Gender and Sex
Ann Ferguson
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20 pm

Lecture, discussion. Introduction to theories of the relations between sex, gender and sexuality from a feminist perspective. Topics include: biological determinist, social constructionist, historical and performative theories of gender and sexuality (Goldberg, Gilder, Freud, Foucault, vs. feminist critics Oakley, de Beauvoir, Chodorow, Rubin, Rich, Butler), sexual identities (hetero-, gay, bi-, trans- and inter- sexualities, and race, class, ethnic differences), and the politics of sexuality (identity politics, conservative politics, queer theory). Readings include: Feinberg Stone Butch Blues, Katz, The Invention of Heterosexuality, Oakley, Sex, Gender and Society, and a packet of readings. Requirements include class participation, two short papers, take home exam, and term paper. This course is also cross-listed WOST 394G.

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
318 THOMPSON HALL
545-2438

POLSCI 374
Issues in Political Theory: Autobiography and Feminist Politics
Pat Mills
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45

With the disappearance of the small consciousness-raising groups that were once the mainstay of feminism, many women have turned to the act of writing to grapple with issues of female identity and feminist politics. The course will focus on autobiographi es by women as well as theoretical accounts of women's autobiographical writing. Topics to be addressed include the problem of "translation" (finding or losing oneself in another language); the development of "zines" by young feminists; and issues of rac ial and ethnic differences among women. Prerequisite: one course in political theory.

POLSCI 375/WOST 395M
Feminist Theory and Politics
Barbara Cruikshank
lecture: Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 pm

A theoretical consideration of different feminisms including liberal-feminism, socialist-feminism, anarcha-feminism, radical feminism, and eco-feminism. Also examines: the relation between feminist theory and practice; the historical development of feminism; feminist issues within the canon of political theory; the problem of identity and difference(s) as related to race, class, and gender. This course is also cross-listed as WOST 395. [This course is not an alternative to the WOST 301 requirement for UMass WOST majors].

POLSCI 675
Feminist Theory and Politics
Barbara Cruikshank
Tuesday 6:30 - 9:00 pm

See department for course description.

PUBLIC HEALTH
106 ARNOLD HOUSE
545-6883

ComHl 213/EDUC 213
Peer Health Education I
Gloria DiFulvio
Wednesday 2:00 - 4:30 pm

Formerly PubHl 213. See Educ 213 for course description.

ComHl 214/EDUC 214
Peer Health Education II
Sally Damon
Thursday 1:00 - 3:30 pm

Formerly PubHl 214. See Educ 214 for course description.

PSYCHOLOGY
403 TOBIN HALL
545-0377

PSYCH 390C
Lesbian Experience
Bonnie Strickland
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Course covers history, literature, and cultural influences of being lesbian; personal and social development and "coming out" processes as one grows up a lesbian; intimacy and sexuality in same sex relationships and the difficulties related to homophobia in general society. Some attention to cross-cultural issues and examination of social advocacy in relation to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people.

SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
710 THOMPSON HALL
545-0427

SOCIOL 222
The Family (SBD)
TBA
lecture 1: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 am
lecture 2: Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 pm

In the first part of the course we examine historical transformations in family life: choice of and relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties. In the second part of the course, lectures, readings and discussions focus on the contemporary family as its members move through the life course: from the choice of a mate, to relations in marriage and finally, to the breakup of the family unit. Examines the distinctive experiences by gender and generation; social class, and race.

SOCIOL 792A
Family and Work
Naomi Gerstel
Thursday 5:30 - 8:00 pm

SOCIAL THOUGHT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY (STPEC)
MACHMER HALL E-27
545-0043

STPEC 493H
Caribbean Women Writers
Roberto Marquez
Wednesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

STPEC majors only. A comparative examination of contemporary women's writing in the Caribbean, featuring the work of some of its most representative authors, with particular emphasis on their engagement with issues of history, cultural articulation, race, class, gender and nationality. Critical exploration of its formal procedures, individual moods, regional particularity, distinct emphasis, and consideration of its broader impact within and outside the area will also be part of our concern. No foreign language requirement. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.