MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE COURSES
SPRING 1996

WS 101s Introduction to Women's Studies
Joyce Soucier
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

An overview of women's position in society and culture, through an examination of women's lives as presented from a variety of experiential and theoretical perspectives. The first section of the course will examine works by women which illuminate both the shared and the diverse social, psychological, political, and economic realities of their experience. The second section will be an introduction to analyses of sexism and oppression, with a focus on different frameworks for making and evaluating feminist arguments. The course will conclude with visionary feminist views of women recreating their lives.

WS 200s(01)/ Hist 296 Women and Gender in African History and Culture
Eugenia Herbert
Tuesday, Thursday 8:35 - 9:50 am

An examination of the roles of women in the social, political, economic, and religious life of specific African cultures. We will use a variety of sources to try to explore conceptions of gender that lie behind these roles. Students with a background in African-American and African studies, and in Women's Studies may petition to take the course for 300-level credit. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

WS 200s(02)/ Hist 276 American Women's History Since 1890

Mary Renda
Monday, Wednesday 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

This course examines the history of women and cultural construction of gender in the US since the end of the last century. How have class, race, and ethnicity shaped the history of women's work, debates over female sexuality, women's attempts at social change, and representations of women in cultural and political contexts? In what ways has gender contributed to racial consciousness and class formation in the US? Using primary and secondary material, we will examine "women's experience" in the realms of work, politics, sexuality, and reproduction.

WS 203s(01)/ Engl 272 Twentieth-Century American Women Writers
Elizabeth Young
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

American women writers have produced a remarkably rich, diverse, and important body of literature in this century. In this course, we will examine a variety of these works, narrowing our scope to prose fiction written by women from the US in the period from roughly 1900 to 1960. Reading feminist criticism along with fiction, we will focus on the interlocking themes of gender, race, and sexuality in these works.

WS 203s(02)/ Asian D242 Japanese Women Writers
Joan Ericson
Monday, Wednesday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

An investigation of the concept of "women's literature" (Joryuu Bungaru), a category in the Japanese literary canon. We will compare the classical novels and poetic diaries by women of the Heian period (794-1185) to the literary forms which have emerged during the recent renaissance of Japanese women writers. The course will combine a study of both the historical development of Japanese literature and the role of women writers within that development, as well as an assessment of the changing dynamics of gender as represented in the fiction of Japanese women writers. All readings, discussion, and writing will be in English. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

WS 220s/ Politics 220 Sex and Politics
Jean Grossholtz
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00 - 12:15 pm

This course presents the nature and extent of violence against women; explanations of the causes of such violence. Topics include society's use of sexual categories as the basis for the distribution of social and political roles; the effects of race and class on women's lives; the translation of sex differences into restrictions on political and social life; and patriarchal power and women's struggle for change.

WS 227/ Politics 227 Women and the City
Marsha Marotta
Monday, Wednesday 11:00 - 12:15 pm

This course explores women's experiences in the city, including the ways cities enhance and constrict women's lives. We will examine how women of different classes, races, ethnicities, and ages have defined themselves as political agents in the city and the roles they have played in community activism. Attention will be given to what is at stake for women in such issues as city planning, urban service delivery, community and neighborhood politics, leadership, crime, and welfare.

WS 233/ Politics 233s Invitation to Feminist Theory
Joan Cocks
Thursday 1:00 - 3:15 pm

On the complex ties and tensions between sex, gender, and power. We explore the overlapping and the public, the home and the world. We examine different forms of power over the body, the ways gender and sexual identities reinforce or challenge the established order, and the historical forces behind current upheavals in sexual relations. Finally, we probe the cultural determinants of "women's emancipation."

WS 250s Global Feminism
TBA
Monday, Wednesday 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

This course offers an intensive study of the worldwide subordination of women, looking at women as producers and consumers, as survivors of male violence, as child rearers and food producers, and as creators of culture and life-support systems. It studies cultural, economic, and structural differences in women's experience and includes presentations by faculty who are expert on women's lives in different regions. The course aims at a critical perspective on existing systems of thought and the creation of a system of thought compatible with women's experience and knowledge. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

WS 300s Buddhism, Feminism, and Ecology
Asoka Bandarage
Monday 2:00 - 4:00 pm

Buddhism, feminism, and ecology are seemingly disparate philosophies of life, yet they share fundamental similarities in how they conceptualize the interconnectedness of human and nonhuman nature. We examine these similarities, as well as differences, in relation to such categories as self and other, unity in diversity, and nonviolence. Particular attention is given to the works of theorists working within ecofeminism and engaged in Buddhism. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

WS 333 (01)/ Engl 372s Genres: Feminist Theory and Film
Elizabeth Young
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

This seminar investigates contemporary feminist theory - and film. We examine the influential formulations of the cinematic "male gaze" and "woman's film"; recent theorization's of race and sexuality in cinema and in culture; gender complexities in popular Hollywood genres; and critical issues emerging from films made by women. Students undertake extensive theoretical readings and attend mandatory weekly film screenings. Enrollment limited to 20. To enroll, pick up an application form at the English Dept., 201 Clapp. You will be notified if you have been accepted into the course within 2 weeks of the close of registration.

WS 333 (02)/ Psych 319 Social Psychology: Gender & Domestic Labor
Francine Deutsch
Wednesday 1:00 - 2:50 pm

Social, psychological, and sociological theories and research addressed to why women do more housework and child care than men are examined. Special attention is paid to the situation of dual-earner families. Class and ethnic differences on the nature of this inequality are considered, and the barriers to full equality at home explored.

WS 333 (03) Rel 325 Hinduism: The Hindu Goddess and Women's Spirituality
Lisa Hallstrom
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:50 pm

In this course we explore the multiplicity and unity of the Hindu Goddess, her associated powers and regional rituals, as well as the historical women considered to be her incarnations. We ask: What is the relationship between Hindu women and the goddess? How does worship of the divine feminine affect Hindu women's lives and self-image? Drawing upon textual, historical, and ethnographic material, as well as slides and films, we listen particularly for women's voices. Prerequisite: 8 credits in department including a 200-level course in religion, or permission of instructor. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

WS 333s(04)/ Hist 375 American History: The Middle Period. Race and Sexuality in American History
Renee Romano
Thursday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

This seminar examines the nature of the intersections between race and sexuality throughout American history, focusing on the ways in which power is manifested through sexualized discourse and behavior. We will consider the conceptual problems of undertaking a history of sexuality, and will pay particular attention to the different types of sources that are available for studying race and sexuality. Sources will include oral histories, vice records, fiction, films and government documents. Students will be expected to write a research paper based in primary sources. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Application forms are available from the History Department Office, 309 Skinner Hall.

WS 348s/ Politics 348 Colloquium in Political Science
Jean Grossholtz
Monday, Wednesday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

See Politics 348 for course description.

Asian Studies D242/ WS 203(02) Japanese Women Writers
Joan Ericson

See WS 203s(02) for course description. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

Classics 216s Women in Antiquity
Nancy Evans
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

A study of the depiction of women in Greek and Roman society through a wide range of classical texts, including history, tragedy, comedy, poetry, and novels. We will analyze the status of women, the roles permitted them, as well as how literary and cultural conventions shaped the representation of women's lives in antiquity.

Econ 100s(01) Women and the Economy
Jens Christiansen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00 - 11:50 am

Introduces students to economic concepts and analytical tools necessary to understand the central role that women have always played in the economy whether in the US or anywhere else in the world. We will also try to understand why and how this central role has traditionally been undervalued and only received scant attention within the economic discipline.

Engl 272/ WS 203s(01) Twentieth-Century American Women Writers
Elizabeth Young
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

See WS 203s(01) for course description.

Engl 372s/ WS 333s(01) Genres: Feminist Theory and Film
Elizabeth Young
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

See WS 333s(01) for course description.

Hist 276/ WS 200s(02) American Women's History Since 1890
Mary Renda
Monday, Wednesday 11:00 - 12:15 pm

See WS 200s(02) for course description.

Hist 296/ WS 200s(01) Women and Gender in African History and Culture
Eugenia Herbert
Tuesday, Thursday 8:35 - 9:50 am

See WS 200s(01) for course description. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

Hist 375/ WS 333s(04) American History: The Middle Period. Race and Sexuality in American History
Renee Romano
Thursday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

See WS 333s(04) for course description.

LatinAm 287/ Span 287 Topics in Latin American Studies: Women and Latin American Cinema
Nina Gerassi-Navarro
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

This course is a critical study of the representation of women in Latin American cinema. Beginning with Mexico's "edad de oro" (1930-1940) to the present, we will explore the positioning of a gendered spectator, the role of melodrama, as well as issues of race and class in the construction of a national identity through film. Special attention will be paid to women directors such as Maria Luisa Bemberg, Sara Gomez, Maria Elena Velasco. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

LatinAm 387s Health in the Andes
Lynn Morgan & Robert Robertson
Wednesday 1:00 - 3:30 pm
component

This seminar examines the relevance of the social sciences, especially medical anthropology and health economics, to understanding and improving human health in the Andean region of South America. We will examine selected issues in the distribution of disease and the delivery and utilization of public health and medical services. We emphasize practical applications of anthropology and economics, including topics such as: the interface of biomedicine and traditional healing; the uses of economic techniques, such as cost-effectiveness analysis, to influence resource use (for example, for immunizations and infectious disease control); and health politics and policy making. Guest speakers will present perspectives and field research. Prerequisite: 8 credits in anthropology or economics, permission of instructors.

Phil 350 Topics in Philosophy: The Metaphysics and Ethics of Sex
Edward Daryl Stein
Monday 7:00 - 9:00 pm

A detailed examination of some metaphysical and ethical issues concerning sex and sexuality. On the metaphysical side, the course will consider the nature of the categories of sexual orientation and scientific research concerning them. On the ethical side, the course will consider lesbian and gay rights, the relationship between law and morality, especially with respect to sex, marriage and its alternatives, and ethical issues concerning "choosing" one's sexual orientation. We will also be concerned with how the metaphysical and ethical issues intersect. What are the political ramifications of the nature of the categories of sexual orientation? What is the relevance of the scientific research to lesbian and gay rights? The course includes philosophical, scientific, legal, political and historical texts as well as texts from lesbian, gay, and feminist perspectives. Prerequisites: 8 credits in the department or permission of instructor.

Politics D207s Women and the Law
Walter Stewart
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:50 pm

This course is an assessment, in terms of political power, of how the legal order impinges on women in American society, with an examination of the legal rights of women in a number of areas of substantive law: equal opportunity in education, employment, and credit; selected aspects of the law governing marital status, the family, and property.

Politics 220/ WS 220s Sex and Politics
Jean Grossholtz
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00 - 12:15 pm

See Women's Studies 220s for course description.

Politics 227s/ WS 227 Women and the City
Marsha Marotta
Monday, Wednesday 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

See WS 227s for course description.

Politics 233s/ WS 233 Invitation to Feminist Theory
Joan Cocks
Thursday 1:00 - 3:50 pm

See WS 233 for course description.

Politics 348/ WS 348s Colloquium: Women Organizing Women
Jean Grossholtz
Monday 7:00 - 9:00 pm

An investigation of women organizing women for political action in the United States and other countries. The course will concentrate on the ways that issues emerge, the process of decision making, and the kind of leadership that develops. Consideration will also be given to different organizational and mobilization strategies and the relationships between long-term goals and short-term tactics of political organization. Specific examples of mobilization will be provided by guest speakers and through student direct involvement with a local social change movement. One class meeting and 3 additional hours per week working off campus.

Psych 319/ WS 333(02) Social Psychology: Gender & Domestic Labor
Francine Deutsch
Wednesday 1:00 - 2:50 pm

See WS 333(02) for course description.

Span 287/ LatinAm 287 Topics in Latin American Studies: Women and Latin American Cinema
Nina Gerassi-Navarro
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

This course is a critical study of the representation of women in Latin American cinema. Beginning with Mexico's "edad de oro" (1930-1940) to the present, we will explore the positioning of a gendered spectator, the role of melodrama, as well as issues of race and class in the construction of a national identity through film. Special attention will be paid to women directors such as Maria Luisa Bemberg, Sara Gomez, Maria Elena Velasco. This course may be counted toward the UMass Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

Theatre Arts 350s Contemporary Women Playwrights
TBA
Wednesday 1:00 - 3:50 pm

This course will examine drama written by women over the last 25 years. Rather than chronological, the approach will be thematic and dramaturgical as the class reads plays focusing on issues like violence, lesbianism, women in the workplace, the family, and world events from a woman's perspective. To supplement the dramatic texts, students will examine Austin's Feminist Theories for Dramatic Criticism and additional articles specific to the plays read. Each student will lead one class and write a research paper as well as complete other shorter projects. A discussion list will be set up for the class on the Internet to further exchange issues raised within the seminar. Students will be encouraged to subscribe and contribute to the Women and Theatre Discussion List on the Internet.