COMPONENT COURSES

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES
325 NEW AFRICA HOUSE
545-2751

AFROAM 254 Introduction to African Studies (HSD) Femi Richards
Monday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Introduction to Africa from an interdisciplinary perspective. Historical approach; chronological sequence from pre-history to contemporary times. Political development and processes, the arts, ethnography, social structures, economies.

AFROAM 257 Contemporary African-American Novel Esther Terry
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

See department for course description.

AFROAM 297B/ The Radical Tradition in American History Manisha Sinha
HIST 297B Monday, Wednesday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

This course will examine the rise and fall of various radical movements in US history from the American Revolution to the 1960s. It will look at the ideologies, strategies, and accomplishments of these movements and prominent radical figures. Under this rubric, the course will include an analysis of the women's rights movement in the nineteenth century and modern feminism.

AFROAM 345 Southern Literature (ALD) Cynthia Packard
Wednesday 7:00 - 10:00 pm

Southern literature by African Americans, including slave narratives, autobiography, fiction and poetry. To be considered: concepts and issues of time, oppression and violence, culture and tradition, family and community, roots of social change as they impact factors of identity, race, class, and gender.

AFROAM 394A Seminar in African Art History Femie Richards
Tuesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Reliable chronology for African art history of placing of the art forms of some of the ethnic cultural groups, associations or countries in Africa in historical perspective. Allied disciplines of anthropology and archaeology used to recover early history of certain cultures. Related oral sources discussed.

AFROAM 597A/ Politics of Slavery and the Coming of the Civil War Manisha Sinha
HIST 597B Wednesday 3:00 - 5:30 pm

See department for course description.

ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT
215 MACHMER HALL
545-2221

ANTH 104 Culture, Society & People (SBD) Jean Forward
lecture: Monday, Wednesday 1:25 - 2:15 pm
section: check Schedule of Courses for times

The nature and cause of human cultural diversity. Topics include: lifeways of diverse societies, forces of cultural change, sources of inequality, cultural ecology, social theory. Examples from many different cultures. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

ANTH 106 Culture Through Film (SBD) Arthur Keene
lecture: Tuesday 6:30 - 9:00 pm
section: check Schedule of Courses for times

Exploration of different societies and cultures, and cultural anthropology, through films. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, sex roles, ethnicity, religion, politics and social change. Film as a medium of communication and cross-cultural understanding. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

ANTH 205 Inequality and Oppression (SBD) Robert Paynter
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

The roots of racism and sexism and issues they raise. The cultural, biological and social contexts of race and gender and examination of the truths and fallacies about biological variation, genetic determinism, human adaptation and the bases of human behavior. Historical influences on our views of how people differ from each other and of overlap among biology, politics, and economics.

ANTH 365 Problems in Anthropology II Arturo Escobar
lecture: Monday, Wednesday 11:15 am - 12:05 pm
section: check Schedule of Courses for times

Continuation of ANTH 364. In depth consideration of theoretical developments in Anthropology, with particular emphasis on Anthropology of Science and Technology, feminist anthropology, and anthropological political economy.

ANTH 390A Contemporary Issues - North American Indians Arthur Keene
Thursday 2:30 - 5:30 pm Robert Paynter

This course is designed to expose students to current issues relevant to the Native peoples of New England. The course will center on guest presentations by Native American scholars whose research is based in New England. These lectures will form the basis for discussions and writing projects.

ANTH 497C Language and Power Jacqueline Urla
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

This course will examine the complex ways in which linguistic behavior is implicated in the workings of social inequalities, modes of domination, and resistance. Topics to be covered will include: the role of language in nation building/nationalism; linguistic dimensions of colonialism; language as a form of symbolic capital; as well as race, ethnic, class and gender differences in communicative style. Class presentations and original research paper required. Seminar format requires active participation in discussions. One prior course in linguistic anthropology, communications, or permission of instructor.

ART HISTORY DEPARTMENT
317B BARTLETT HALL
545-3595

ARTHIS 568 Contemporary Art Anne Mochon
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20-1:15 pm

Issues and developments in American art after 1940 from the present perspective. Cultural and art historical context of the postwar work of American artists from Abstract Expressionism through the most recent options raised in the works themselves, artists' writings, critics' interpretations, public reception, and support. Prerequisite: ARTHIS 522. Enrollment limited to about 20. May register for Honors.

ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE DEPARTMENT
325 NEW AFRICA HOUSE 545-2751

CHINESE 154/ Chinese Literature: Tales, Short Donald Gjertson
COMLIT 154 Stories, Novels (ALD)
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 am

Introduction to Chinese fictional works from early times to fall of the empire in 1911. Approach will combine the historical with thematic, and a broad selection of tales, short stories, and novels, concerned with adventure, revenge, crime and detection, love, manners, religious allegory, karma, and the supernatural will be read in English translation and discussed in class. Readings: a variety of paperback texts will be assigned. Requirements: 4 short papers, in-class midterm, take-home final, term paper. No prerequisites. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

JAPAN 135 Japanese Art and Culture (ID) William Naff
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:15 pm

Development of Japanese art from the prehistoric period to the mid-16th century. Attention to the relation of written documents and artistic works. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

JAPAN 143/ Japanese Literature: Classical and Medieval (ALD) Doris Bargen
COMLIT 240 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 am

Lecture, discussion. The course will trace the development of poetry, prose, and drama from early times to the 16th century. All readings will be done in English translation. They include examples of waka and haiku poetry; semi-fictional memoirs written by court women; novelistic prose fiction; Noh plays. Requirements include one class presentation on a topic of the student's choice, three essay tests, and regular participation in class discussion. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
524 HERTER HALL 545-0512/545-5776

CLSCS 224 Greek Mythology (AL) Ed Phinney
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:30 pm

Structure and meaning of ancient Greek myths. Political, social, artistic, and religious expression of myths in both ancient and modern times. Emphasis on creation, transformation, and heroic myths as told by Homer, Hesiod, Ovid, Vergil, and Apuleius.

CLSCS 326 Egyptian and Indo-Iranian Mythology (AL) Ed Phinney
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15 am

Structure and meaning of ancient Egyptian, Hindu, and Persian myths. Political, social, artistic, and religious expression of myths in both ancient and modern times. Emphasis both on ritual, creation, funerary, heroic, and royal myths from Pharaonic Giza and Karnak, India, and Iran.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE DEPARTMENT
303 SOUTH COLLEGE
545-0929

COMLIT 122 Spiritual Autobiography (ALD) staff
lecture 1: Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 am - 10:45 am
lecture 2: Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Lecture, discussion. Spiritual autobiography is writing about the self or selves in confrontation with the unknown, during times of personal or social crisis, loss and rebirth. (Spiritual in this sense does not necessarily refer to institutionalized religion - in fact, a spiritual crisis may happen through the failure of religion). We will read autobiographies from several traditions and many time periods - medieval Christianity, 11th century Japan, 20th century Black America, the slums of Modern Brazil, China just before WWII, etc. Some possible readings: The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Education of Henry Adams, Black Elk Speaks, Carlo Levi's Christ Stopped at Eboli, Maya Angelou's I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Daughter of Han, Chogyan Trungpa's Born in Tibet, Sei Shonagon's Pillow Book, and others. Requirements: 4 short autobiographical papers, 2 pages each. Midterm in class, take-home final. No prerequisites. Heavy Readings.

COMLIT 131 Brave New World (ALD) staff
lectures 1 & 2: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 am
lecture 3: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15 am

Lecture, discussion. Aim: this course studies novels that present and represent Modernist totalitarian worlds, and Postmodern worlds of fragmentation, diversity and abandonment. Address issues of interest in the current cultural crisis, for example: What have governments done and what should they do? Is individualism tenable in a world of five billion people? Is freedom an absolute condition? And what role does art in particular and culture in general hope to play in the era of global Consumerism? Readings (subject to revision): Huxley, Brave New Worlds and Island; Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and/or A Scanner Darkly; Gibson, Neuromancer; Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale; Piercy, :Woman on the Edge of Time, etc. WARNING: THIS IS A HEAVY READING COURSE.

COMLIT 141 Good and Evil, East and West (ALD) TBA
lecture: Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am
section: check Schedule of Courses for times

The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross-cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world. Contemporary issues of nuclear war, holocaust, AIDS, abortion, marginal persons, anawim, unwanted children.

COMLIT 154/ Chinese Literature: Tales, Short Stories, Novels Donald Gjertson
CHINESE 154 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 am

Introduction to Chinese fictional works from early times to fall of the empire in 1911. Approach will combine the historical with thematic, and a broad selection of tales, short stories, and novels, concerned with adventure, revenge, crime and detection, love, manners, religious allegory, karma, and the supernatural will be read in English translation and discussed in class. Readings: a variety of paperback texts will be assigned. Requirements: 4 short papers, in-class midterm, take-home final, term paper. No prerequisites. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

COMLIT 240/ Japanese Literature: Classical and Medieval Doris Bargen
JAPAN 143 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 am

Lecture, discussion. The course will trace the development of poetry, prose, and drama from early times to the 16th century. All readings will be done in English translation. They include examples of waka and haiku poetry; semi-fictional memoirs written by court women; novelistic prose fiction; Noh plays. Requirements include one class presentation on a topic of the student's choice, three essay tests, and regular participation in class discussion.

COMLIT 597A Cold War Culture Cathy Portuges
Tuesday 4:00 - 7:00 pm
Thursday 4:00 - 7:00 pm

The primary cultural paradigm of the past half-century has been that of the cold war. This course means to interrogate the visual legacy of the bipolar modes of thought that emerged from that system by asking if and how it is being supplanted and superseded in the 1990s. Students will engage in a comparative analysis of the intellectual and visual ramifications of the era's culture as represented in selected feature and documentary films from the US and Europe, producing a 25-page research paper to be accompanied by oral presentation. Close textual readings will be undertaken in conjunction with readings from works of film theory and history, popular and material culture, and selected essays and works of fiction. Topics include: the concept oppositional "blocs" as narrative, global categories for conceptualizing subjectivity; cinematic encounters with - and interventions between - socialism and capitalism; the centrality of genre (e.g. the spy movie, science fiction) as a cultural construct; gendered constructions of cold war culture; psychoanalytic and anthropological interpretations of "otherings," such as the repressed other in the subject/self; national origins and international significance of the Wall; and discursive inscriptions of the divisions between east and west.

COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT
407 MACHMER HALL
545-1311

COMM 397U Special Topics: Communication, Identity and Community Hannah Kliger
Monday 3:35 - 6:30 pm

Lecture, discussion. This course examines communication practices within specific cultural contexts to see the forms of personal and group identity that emerge from the creation and sharing of meanings. We examine the stories told and lived by real people, and we analyze how individuals and communities actively interpret their social activities and cultural experiences to foster a sense of belonging. Readings include the representation of cultural knowledge in interpersonal and mass media settings regarding the expression of ethnic affiliation, gender differences, and those identities shaped by the workplace, by residence, by age, and by voluntary association.

COMM 397V Special Topics: Film and Physical Disabilities Martin Norden
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 4:45 pm

Lecture, discussion, lab. An exploration of mainstream movie ("Hollywood") constructions of physical disability, how they have changed throughout the 20th century, and how they have influenced and/or reflected our society. We will examine not only representative narrative movies but also the industrial and socio-cultural circumstances that allowed these movies to be made. We will approach the movies as forms of political discourse designed to keep people with disabilities "in their place" by defining them primarily as objects of pity, awe, humor, or fear. Requirements: TBA. Text: Norden, The Cinema of Isolation: A History of Physical Disability in the Movies, perhaps others. A background in film studies is preferred but not required. COMM Juniors and Seniors or permission of instructor. Preference will be given to COMM majors.

COMM 491E Seminar - Media and Family Michael Morgan
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Lecture, discussion. Over the years, the family has gradually given up many of its functions and much of its authority to outside institutions. Unique among these are mass media, which come inside the home; television in particular shapes family interaction patterns while spreading the dominant images and values of society. This seminar explores existing theory and research in order to assess what we know about such issues as the images of families presented in the media and what they contribute to our beliefs about families, the ways in which media influence family interaction, how families can and do mediate the effects of television, and related questions. Course requirements include a brief written commentaries and oral presentations based on the readings, and a final research project.

COMM 594C Seminar: Communication and Socialization Hannah Kliger
Wednesday 3:35 - 6:30 pm

This course is concerned with the role of communication in the socialization process, from childhood through old age. How do we come to belong to a social group and acquire some its values, beliefs, perspectives, and preferences? Emphasis is on methodological issues in studying the extent to which communication behavior is related to the socialization or resocialization of individuals. Seminar participants will be expected to complete research reports about designing and implementing fieldwork related to the course.

CONSUMER STUDIES DEPARTMENT
101 SKINNER HALL
545-2391

CS 155 Dress and Culture (SBD) Susan Michelman
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Dress and culture examined from an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective focusing on diversity and social change. Discussion of sociocultural meaning of dress in European, African, North and South American, Pacific, and Asian cultures. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

CS 597A Special Topics: 19th Century Costume History Pat Warner
Tuesday and Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

See department for course description.

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
1004 THOMPSON HALL
545-0855

ECON 105 Introduction to Political Economy (SBD) Richard Wolff
lecture: Monday, Wednesday 10:10 am
section: Friday 9:05, 10:10, or 11:15 am

Lecture plus discussion section. Introduction to economic analysis for majors and non-majors. Facts and concepts basic to understanding the US Economy today. Topics include: unemployment, economic development, inequality, technology, government economic policy, economic alternatives, and discrimination. Contrasting theoretical perspectives. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

ECON 144 Political Economy of Racism (SBD) TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

The interaction between economics and racial discrimination. The economic history of race relations and the economic experience of non-whites in the US conservative, liberal, and radical views of discrimination evaluated. Policy questions and current issues discussed. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

ECON 305 Marxian Economic Theory TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Introduction to Marxian theory and modern political economy. Logic and methods of Marxian analysis of economic change; comparisons between Marxian and non-Marxian theories.

ECON 330 Labor in the American Economy Lois Yachetta
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Introduction to labor economics; emphasis on public policy issues such as unemployment, age and sex discrimination, collective bargaining, labor law reform, occupational safety and health.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
124 FURCOLO HALL
545-0233

EDUC 210 Social Diversity in Education (ID) Maurianne Adams

Issues of social group identity and diversity. Social oppression by race, gender, religion, and physical or mental ability. Contact department at 545-2803 for registration information and meeting times.

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL ISSUES COURSES ARE ONE CREDIT. THERE IS A MANDATORY ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING FOR ALL SECTIONS ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, FROM 7:00 - 9:30 PM IN THE CAMPUS CENTER. STUDENTS WILL NOT BE ADMITTED TO THE COURSE IF THEY DO NOT ATTEND THIS SESSION.

EDUC 392D Racism Ximena Zuniga
Weekend session on 4/20 and 4/21.

EDUC 392E Sexism Barbara Love
Weekend session on 4/27 and 4/28.

EDUC 392F Jewish Oppression Maurianne Adams
Weekend session on 4/24 and 4/25.

EDUC 392G Disability Oppression Pat Griffin
Weekend session on 3/2 and 3/3.

EDUC 392K Classism Barbara Love
Weekend session on 3/9 and 3/10.

EDUC 392L Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual Oppression Pat Griffin
Weekend session on 3/30 and 3/31.

EDUC 462 Teaching Elementary Science Klaus Schultz
Wednesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

In the process of learning science concepts through the eyes of children, reflecting on our own learning and that of others, one significant component concerns how gender and gender role expectations interact with learning science. The course is hands-on and discussion-oriented. Assignments consist of observations, projects, and reflective writings. Assessment is based on these assignments. Primarily for prospective teachers, but also for prospective "informal" teachers such as parents, and for students of learning. Contact instructor for registration information.

EDUC 491P Seminar: Day Care Supervision Meg Barden Cline
Tuesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

See department for course description.

EDUC 505 Documentary Filmmaking for Education Liane Brandon
Wednesday 4:00-6:30 pm

This introductory course provides students, teachers, human service workers, educational professionals and others with practical filmmaking experience and skills to document aspects of their research programs, interests and educational endeavors. Students make three short documentary films during the semester.

EDUC 539 Using Film and Video in Education Liane Brandon
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 pm

This course is designed to explore and encourage the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings; to examine the visual, psychological and technical methods used by video and filmmakers to convey their messages; and to suggest a variety of techniques for structuring discussions in the class-room. Emphasis will be on developing critical, aesthetic, and social media awareness, and on examining films and videos for their cultural and historical perspectives and biases, as well as their messages in regard to gender, race, age, language etc.

EDUC 698P Practicum in Day Care Administration Meg Barden Cline
1-6 credits; by arrangement

Opportunities to learn about administration by working with women administrators of day care centers, nursery schools, or resource and referral agencies in the area.

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
170 BARTLETT HALL
545-2332

ENGL 290B American Identities Judith Fryer
Lecture 01: Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Explores the ways literature participates in the definition of national identity. Readings focus on ways American issues of creed, class, status, gender, self and community, possession and dispossession, nationhood and ethnicity, and language have contributed to American identities. Prerequisite: ENGLWP 112, or equivalent.

ENGL 361H Modern Novel, 1890-1930 - Honors (AL) R. Radhakrishnan
Monday, Wednesday 9:05 - 11:00 am

Intensive analysis of modernity from the point of view of gender and the third world. Readings from literature, sociology and philosophy, feminism, modernity, narratives of the nation.

ENGL 480D Asian-American Writers: Ethnicity and the Politics of Location Ketu Katrak
Thursday 11:15 am - 2:15 pm

This course explores the work of selected Asian American writers in the English language. Our study analyzes the politics of location and how locations impact ethnicities. Writers' identities are negotiated along issues of race, gender, language, nationality, and crucially in our contemporary time, geography. Asian American writers embrace a multiplicity of identities as immigrant/citizen/expatriate. Identities require complex negotiations in terms of ethnic and political affiliations between one's "native" and one's "adoptive" home. Identities are forged around the overarching search for home and a need to belong. Our study includes recent South Asian writers as well as second and third generation US citizens of Japanese and Chinese ancestry with the use of a historical perspective. This historical perspective emphasis explores the overlaps and differences in literary traditions and experiences of race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Representative selection of literary genres will be studied: novels, poems, drams, essays by writers such as Joy Kogawa, Jessica Hagedorn, Velina Houston, Agha Shahid Ali, Maxine Hong Kingston among others.

ENGL 708 Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Arlyn Diamond
Thursday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

An examination of the tales as a literary collection and a cultural document. How does Chaucer represent the social conflicts - e.g. about religion, marriage, youth vs. age, the role of women, honor and violence - which generate the tales? What is his literary and historical context?

ENGL 891E Asian American Writers Ketu Katrak
Wednesday 10:10 am - 1:10 pm

See department for course description.

ENGL 892 Body/Politics Judith Fryer
Wednesday 1:25-4:25

Explores representations of the body in visual and verbal documents of the 20th century; interdisciplinary American Studies course.

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT
236 MORRILL
545-1535

GEOG 360 Economic Geography (SBD) Julie Graham
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 -am - 12:30 pm

See department for course description.

GEOG 660 Industrial Geography Julie Graham
Tuesday 2:30 - 5:15 pm

See department for course description.

HISTORY DEPARTMENT
612 HERTER HALL
545-1330

HIST 131/Middle Eastern History II (HSD)Yvonne Haddad
NEAST 101 Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Understanding of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East. Emphasis on the events of the 20th century that helped shape the present. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

HIST 161 History of Africa since 1500 (HSD) Joye Bowman
lecture: Tuesday, Thursday 10:10 am
section: Th 11:15, or 1:25; Fri 10:10 or 11:15

Lecture and discussion. Topics to be covered include African and European imperialism, nationalism, and independence; how these developments have changed the life and culture of African people. No prerequisites. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

HIST 297B/ The Radical Tradition in American History Manisha Sinha
AFROAM 297B Monday, Wednesday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

This course will examine the rise and fall of various radical movements in US history from the American Revolution to the 1960s. It will look at the ideologies, strategies, and accomplishments of these movements and prominent radical figures. Under this rubric, the course will include an analysis of the women's rights movement in the nineteenth century and modern feminism.

HIST 340 Civilization of Islam I Yvonne Haddad
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

History of Islam from the time of Mohammed to 1600. The development of Islamic thought, practice, beliefs, and institutions during the height of Islamic civilization.
HIST 405H American Biography: The Kennedy Era Steve Oates
Monday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

Honors seminar. The spring 96 version of this course focuses on some of the leading figures of the Kennedy Era and the 1960s: Jack and Robert Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, J. Edgar Hoover, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Marilyn Monroe. As we study the Kennedy Era through biography, I hope that my students will learn a great deal about seven unique human beings, about one of the most extraordinary decades of modern times, about the importance of individuals in shaping the course of recent American history, and about a unique genre of historical writing.

HIST 491A The Kennedys Through Film Steve Oates
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm

Through the powerful mediums of film and the written and spoken word, the course seeks to illuminate the turbulent 1960s through the lives and careers of John and Robert Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Martin Luther King, Jr., Lyndon Baines Johnson, and other significant figures of the period. Each weekly class period will be devoted to a chapter in the unfolding saga of the Kennedys and the Sixties, and will involve the showing of one or more films. Films include The Kennedys, Scandalous Mayor, Eyes on the Prize, Marilyn, Missiles of October, JFK, Born on the Fourth of July, and LBJ. Readings: biographies of John F. Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Lyndon Johnson; Robert Kennedy's memoir of the Cuban Missile crisis; and essays on the JFK assassination and the Vietnam war. Written work: two essay examinations and an optional independent paper.

HIST 493 Seminar - Colonial Africa Joye Bowman
Tuesday 1:00-4:00 pm

The meaning of colonialism in Africa. The evolution, implementation, and development of European colonialism. Also, the demise of the system. The meaning of colonialism for the common people.

HIST 597A/ Politics of Slavery and the Coming of the Civil War Manisha Sinha
AFROAM 597B Wednesday 3:00 - 5:30 pm

See department for course description.

JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT
108 BARTLETT HALL
545-1376

JOURN 375 News Editing (4 credits) Sara Grimes
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Teaches the theory and techniques of news editing and headline writing. Focusing on the copy editor's role, this course includes review of basic language and research skills. Lectures and discussions are broader areas of editing responsibility such as news value, libel and taste. Prerequisite: JOURN 300 or permission of instructor.

JOURN 492M Magazine Writing (4 credits) Sara Grimes
lect. 1 only: Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Instruction and practice in magazine journalism. This course helps students develop writing, research and reporting skills through attention to longer more complex forms of journalistic writing. Students propose, research, report, write, and revise articles. Readings in current and classic magazine literature.

JUDAIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES
744 HERTER HALL
545-2550

JUDAIC 192A Seminar - Judaism and Social Issues (1 credit) Saul Perlmutter
Monday 2:30 pm

This course will explore modern social issues such as the environment, sexuality, abortion, and intermarriage ... through the eyes of the Jewish tradition. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

LABOR STUDIES DEPARTMENT
125 DRAPER HALL
545-2884

LABOR 290A Labor and Work in the U.S. (ID) TBA
lecture: Tuesday 2:30 - 3:45 pm
section: Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm or 4:00 - 5:15 pm

The evolution and current status of labor and work in the US. Examines multiple perspectives on workers, unions, workplace systems, and worker rights.

LEGAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
221 HAMPSHIRE HOUSE
545-0021

LS 460 Legalization of American Indians (HSD) Peter d'Errico
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Native people in American history. Law as mechanism of cultural oppression, land expropriation. Native culture, social structure through contemporary accounts, recent books, film, etc.

LS 491B Seminar - Film Censorship Dianne Brooks
Thursday 6:00 - 8:30 pm

See department for course description.

LS 497D Special Topics: Civil Rights, Post-Brown Jerrold Levinsky
Wednesday 7:00-9:00 p.m.

See department for course description.

NURSING DEPARTMENT
222 ARNOLD HOUSE
545-2703

NURSE 212 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness (ID) Dorothy Gilbert
Monday, Wednesday 12:15 - 1:30 pm

Explores theoretical foundations for understanding cultural diversity in health and illness beliefs and behaviors, and selected practical implications of this understanding. Cultures within the US emphasized. Open to non-majors.

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT
352 BARTLETT HALL
545-2330

PHIL 702F Graduate Seminar in Foucault Ann Ferguson
Monday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Seminar on the philosopher Michel Foucault. Reading will include Madness and Civilization, The Order of Things, Discipline and Punish, History of Sexuality, v. 1, Power/Knowledge and other lectures and interviews connected to his core concepts of epistemes, power/knowledge and the deployment of sexuality. We will also explore the relation of Foucault's view on sexuality and the self to feminist concerns and queer theory. A good background in social theory is recommended. Undergraduates require permission of instructor to enroll.

PHIL 792M Seventeenth Century Metaphysics Eileen O'Neill
Wednesday 3:35 - 6:00 pm

The course will focus on two central themes in early modern metaphysics: substance and causation. We shall examine the nature of corporeal body, the nature of mind, the relation of mind and body, perception, the extent of God's causal efficacy, philosophical method and the relation of gender and rationality. Readings will reflect a gender-balanced historical approach; they will include texts by St. Thomas, Giambattista della Porta, Marie de Gournay, Rene Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Thomas Hobbes, Pierre Gassendi, Margaret Cavendish, Nicolas Malebranche, Mary Astell and G.W. Leibniz.

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
318 THOMPSON HALL
545-2438

PS 363 The Politics of Law John Brigham
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

This course is about how law is political. We will study jurisprudential traditions including how people give meaning to law, the role of institutions like lawyers, courts and police in the construction of society -- particularly class, race and sexual relations, and contemporary movements in law such as Feminism, Critical Legal Studies and Critical Race Theory. Throughout, the implications of women entering the field in large numbers will be explored.

PSYCHOLOGY
403 TOBIN HALL
545-0377

PSYCH 217 The Psychology of Good and Evil Ervin Staub
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Lecture. Important forms of kindness and cruelty (helping and harming among individuals like sexual, youth and other types of violence; generosity, everyday kindness, or heroic rescue of people in danger, and lives of moral commitment; violence between groups like genocide, ethnic conflict, war and police violence). Historical conditions, cultures, personal characteristics that lead to altruism and aggression, kindness or cruelty. Differentiation between "us" and "them", devaluation, scapegoating, hate; the role of ideology; prosocial values, empathy, feelings of responsibility. Socialization in the home and in schools, experience with peers, culture promoting kindness or cruelty.

PSYCH 392 The Development of Caring, Nonviolent and Optimally Functioning Person: Psychological and Personal Experience
Ervin Staub
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

For psychology majors fulfilling Junior Year Writing Requirement - Open to Psychology majors only. The determinants or origins of people helping or harming others, of altruism and aggression between individuals and groups The role of personal characteristics (value, empathy, motives, the self concept) and cultural-societal characteristics. The focus will be on the socialization of children and adolescents, their experiences at home, in schools, in interaction with peers, and in their culture and society, that leads to the development of caring about others' welfare and helping others, and makes aggression and violence less likely. How do such experiences promote or interfere with optimal human functioning, or the development of full humanness. The course will focus on both existing psychological knowledge and the personal experiences of class members.

PUBLIC HEALTH
106 ARNOLD HOUSE
545-6883

PubHl 160 My Body, My Health (I) Gerald Davoli
lecture: Monday, Wednesday 3:35
section: Friday 11:15 am or 12:20 pm

Lecture, discussion. Principles of health promotion and personal wellness with emphasis on stress management, nutrition, physical fitness, substance abuse prevention, prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, and human sexuality. Students design and implement a 3- to 4- week self-directed health behavior change program. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

PubHl 233 Sex, Drugs, and AIDS (I) Kwadwo Bosompra
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

Global perspective on relationship between sexual behavior, drug use, and AIDS. Approaches to prevention, including education, HIV testing, control of sexually transmitted disease, drug abuse treatment, and needle exchanges.

SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
710 THOMPSON HALL
545-0427

SOCIOL 106 Race, Sex, and Social Class (SBD) Dan Clawson
lecture: Monday, Wednesday 10:10 am
section: check Schedule of Courses for times

This course will cover (tentatively) the following four units: struggle, family, education, and drugs. Each unit examines the inter-relation of race, sex, and class in modern America. Note: 100-level courses do not count toward the UMass major in Women's Studies.

SOCIOL 591A Analyzing Crime Anthony Harris
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:00 pm

See department for course description.

SOCIOL 720 Sociology of Education Pamela Quiroz
by arrangement

Educational characteristics of an industrial population; comparative social structures and their school systems; educational selection and social stratification; educational development as effect and cause of social change; the culture of schools and universities. Prerequisites: one graduate course in sociological theory and one course in research methods.

SOCIAL THOUGHT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY (STPEC)
MACHMER HALL E-27
545-0043

STPEC 491H Racism: A Worldview and its Resultant Structures (4 credits) Deirdre Royster
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

OPEN TO STPEC MAJORS ONLY. In this course, we will examine a multitude of studies that examine the historical and contemporary impacts of racism in the US. We will attempt a multi-disciplinary examination by including materials written from historical, anthropological, sociological, political science, legal and economic points of view. This course will revolve around four sub-areas, with one core text for each area with supplementary articles and chapters included on occasion. The first area will examine the emergence of race as a worldview and the racist structures that it engendered; the second area will cover the histories of various ethnic immigrants and their struggles to overcome and/or avoid racialized hostility in the US; the third area will examine racism as a factor in the political economy of employment in the US; and the fourth area will examine the impact of racism on the social welfare policies of the US.

STPEC 493H African-American Health Issues (4 credits) Michelle Murrain
Monday, Wednesday 1:25 - 3:20 pm

OPEN TO STPEC MAJORS ONLY. This course will explore the research available on African-American health, primarily focusing around disparities in health status and the potential factors involved in this disparity. We will explore a specific set of case studies where there is a fair amount of information available. These will include: infant mortality, cancer, AIDS, and hypertension. We will also look at issues of social class, stress, health status. Readings will include scientific review articles, primary scientific articles and some readings in social and economic theory.