Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies
Fall 2014 Departmental Courses

Departmental courses automatically count towards the major or minor with the except of 100-level courses, which only count towards the minor.  For additional courses covering applied areas of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies, consult the Component Course section.


Afro-American Studies 329 New Africa House  545-2751

AFROAM 297F – Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Karla Zelaya
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms and Transnational Feminisms

This course will survey the historical, political, economic and socio-cultural realities that Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean have faced and continue to face. A variety of readings by and about Black women will highlight the ways in which race, class, and gender combine to operate in the lives of Black women. Special attention will be paid to Black women as laborers, Black women as political activists, and the various ways in which Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean experience race and gender.

Asian Languages and Literature 440 Herter Hall   545-2087

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Suet-Ying Chiu
Distribution requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women's social role has evolved from pre-modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women's agency, "inner-outer" division, and the yin-yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.

JAPANESE 391S/521S – Women Writers of Japan
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Amanda Seaman
Distribution requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

Although Japan was famous for its thriving female literary culture during the Heian era (794‐1185), the centuries  that followed were ones in which women authors appear to have played a minor role. It was not until the Meiji Restoration in 1868, with its emphasis upon new and “modern” cultural attitudes and norms, that women became a more significant presence on the Japaneseliterary scene. In this course, we will explore a number of works from this modern revival of Japanese women’s writing, identify themes that these women explore, the genres to which they contribute, and interrogate the notion of “women’s literature” itself to see how the term has been used (or abused) in the Japanese academy.

 

Communications ILC Building      545-1311

COMM 394R (#73019) – Race, Gender and the Sitcom
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Demetria Shabazz
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course examines the situation comedy from sociological and artistic perspectives. We will seek, first of all, to understand how situation-comedy is a rich and dynamic meaning-producing genre within the medium of television. Secondly we will work to dissect narrative structures, and the genre's uses of mise-en-scene, cinematography/ videography, editing, and sound to create specific images of the family through social constructions of race, class, and gender. In addition we will use various critical methods such as semiotics, genre study, ideological criticism, cultural studies, and so on to interrogate why the sitcom form since its inception in the 1950s has remained one of the most popular genres for audiences and industry personnel alike and assess what the genre might offer us in terms of a larger commentary on notions of difference and identity in the US and beyond.  Satisfies the IE require for BA-Comm majors.  Open to Senior and Junior Communication Majors only.  This course was formally numbered COMM 397NN.  If you have already taken COMM 397NN you cannot take this course.

 

Economics 1006 Thompson Hall      545-2590

ECON 348 – The Political Economy of Women
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45
Lisa Saunders

A critical review of neoclassical, Marxist, and feminist economic theories pertaining to inequality between men and women in both the family and the firm.

 

School of Education  125 Furcolo Hall      545-6984

EDUC 392E – Social Issues Workshop:  Sexism
Kerrita Mayfield

Workshop addresses the dynamics of sexism on personal and institutional levels.  All students registered for EDUC 392 MUST attend a mandatory First Night Orientation on Wednesday, September 11th, 5:30-8:00pm, location:  TBA, and one Weekend, 9am-5pm. 

EDUC 392I (#75719)– Social Issues Workshop:  Transgender Oppression
Ximena Zuniga

This course addresses the dynamics of transgender oppression in personal and institutional levels. All students registered for EDUC 392 MUST attend a mandatory First Night Orientation on Wednesday, September 10th, 5:30-8:00pm, location:  TBA, and one Weekend, 9am-5pm.  See SPIRE for weekend seminar locations.

EDUC 392L – Social Issues Workshop:  Heterosexism
Ximena Zuniga

Workshop addresses the dynamics of heterosexism on personal and institutional levels.  All students registered for EDUC 392 MUST attend a mandatory First Night Orientation on Wednesday, September 10th, 5:30-8:00pm, location:  TBA, and one Weekend, 9am-5pm.  See SPIRE for weekend seminar locations.

EDUC 621B – Race, Class and Gender in Higher Education
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Benita Barnes

The goal of this course is to explore the multiple sociocultural factors that influence the success of students and ask fundamental questions about the relationship between higher education and society. Why do some students learn more and "get further ahead" than others? Why do some students get more involved in co-curricular activities than others? What factors shape how institutions are run and organized, who attends four-year vs. two-year institutions, and what curricular materials are taught?

EDUC 704 – Issues of Gender in Science and Science Education
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Kathleen Davis

Issues of gender relative to the participations of all individuals in science activity; historical and on-going structures, policies, and practices that influence legitimacy and participation; and the intersection and relationships between social groups.

 

English 170 Bartlett Hall      545-2332

ENGLISH 132 (#70738) – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m., Gina Ocasion
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1220-1:10 p.m., Ashley Nadeau

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

 

Germanic and Scandinavian Studies 513 Herter Hall      545-2350

GERMAN 363 – Witches:  Myth and Reality
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
Kerstin Mueller Demblin

This course focuses on various aspects of witches/witchcraft in order to examine the historical construction of the witch in the context of the social realities of women (and men) labeled as witches.  The main areas covered are:  European pagan religions and the spread of Christianity; the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe, with an emphasis on the German situation; 17th-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the images of witches in folk lore and fairy tales in the context of the historical persecutions; and contemporary Wiccan/witch practices in their historical context.  The goal of the course is to deconstruct the stereotypes that many of us have about witches/witchcraft, especially concerning sexuality, gender, age, physical appearance, occult powers, and Satanism.  Readings are drawn from documentary records of the witch persecutions and witch trials, literary representations, scholarly analyses of witch-related phenomena, and essays examining witches, witchcraft, and the witch persecutions from a contemporary feminist or neo-pagan perspective.  The lectures will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources.  Conducted in English.  (Gen Ed. I, G)

 

History Department 612 Herter Hall      545-1330

HISTORY 388 – U.S. Women’s History to 1890
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alice Nash

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American women's lives from the colonial period to 1890, and explores women's participation in and responses to those changes. Topics include: the transformation of work and family life, women's culture, the emergence of the feminist movement, sexuality and women's health, race and ethnic issues. Sophomore level and above.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

HISTORY 395S – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender, Race and Social Class
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy. Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.  Must not have completed Political Science 395S.

HISTORY 397WL – Women and the Law
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m. 
Jennifer Nye

Using legal history and legal theory, this course will examine the ways women are represented within the law, focusing specifically on the legal treatment and representation of women in the United States.  We will examine the ways that the law has oppressed women and also the prospects for the law as a liberating force.  Finally, we will look at ways that women have used the law to represent themselves.  Specific issues that will be explored include the civil and political participation of women, employment, intimate relationships, reproduction and contraception, violence against women, women as criminal defendants, and women as law students, lawyers, and judges.

HISTORY 594F – U.S. History of Immigrant Women
TBD
Laura Lovett

This writing seminar on immigrant women's experience in the United States has a dual focus-- grappling with modes of historical understanding and fostering the growth of student research and writing skills.  The seminar addresses women's immigrant experience (including refugees and temporary workers) from the mid-nineteenth century to the late twentieth century.  Readings will include oral history, autobiography, biography, and scholarly studies of specific groups of immigrant women.  Open to seniors and juniors in History, Middle East and Judaic majors only. 

EDUC 791B - U.S. Women and Gender History
Wednesday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Laura Lovett

Issues of gender relative to the participations of all individuals in science activity; historical and on-going structures, policies, and practices that influence legitimacy and participation; and the intersection and relationships between social groups.

Political Science 218 Thompson Hall      545-2438

POLSCI 395F – Women and Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

See department for description.  Open to Senior and Junior Political Science majors only.
Open to non majors (Jr, SR) after first week of registration.

POLSCI 395S (#76786) – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender, Race and Social Class
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.  Open to Senior and Junior Political Science majors only.  This course is combined with History 395S. You cannot have taken 395S as this is the same course.

POLSCI 795E – Collective Action/Political Change
Tuesday 5:30-8:00 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

This course in designed to review and interrogate the multiple, often competing, ways in which social scientists have theorized the roles of various kinds of collective actors in politics.  We will consider a range of such actors, including interest groups, social movements (“old” and “new,” national and transnational), civil society associations, non-governmental organizations, those social actors recently grouped under the label the “Third Sector,” as well as current protest movements across the globe. From the vantage point of diverse theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches, we will ask: Who are the collective actors considered relevant to politics and why?   How do shifting concepts and discourses regarding diverse forms of collective action reflect changing theoretical and political agendas?  When and how are “social” actors/movements transformed into “political” ones?  When and how does collective action shift scales, from local, to national, to global?  What is the relationship between culture and politics in social movements/collective action?  How and why do various authors/approaches endorse, problematize, or reject the distinction between “the political” and “the social” (and, for that matter, “the cultural,” “the economic,” etc.)?  Select case studies, largely from Latin America, Europe, and the US, will help ground our theoretical exploration of these questions (and many more…).

 

Psychology 441 Tobin Hall   545-2383

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the GLBT Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
John Bickford
Distribution requirement:  Sexuality studies

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health.  Senior Psychology Majors only.  Prerequisite: PSYCH 241

 

Public Health & Health Sciences 408 Arnold House      545-4530

PUBHLTH 390W – Fundamentals of Women’s Health
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.

PUBHLTH 497E – Global Perspectives on Women’s Health
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson

In this seminar, students will discuss a variety of issues affecting women's health around the world. Topics include maternal mortality, family planning, infectious disease, sex trafficking, and gender-based violence.

 

Social Thought and Political Economy (STPEC) E27A Machmer      545-0043

STPEC 492H – Marxism, Queer Theory and Materialism
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Jordana Rosenberg

This course will consider materialist approaches to queer theory. Our main framing methodology with be Marxism, and we will seek to both review canonical understandings of the intersection of Marxist and anti-capitalist thinking with queerness, as well as develop our own theories about how these intersections might be described, understood, and felt. Special consideration will be given to the question of queerness and contemporary forms of finance capital, as well as queerness and settler-colonialism, colonial formations, and racialization. Authors will include: Karl Marx, Judith Butler, Jasbir Puar, Kara Keeling, Deleuze and Guattari, Fred Moten, Mel Chen, Scott Morgensen, David Harvey, Sandro Messadra, Rosa Luxemburg, Audre Lorde, Roderick Ferguson, Kathi Weeks, Silvia Federici, and more.

Sociology 710 Thompson Hall      545-0577

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m.,  TBD, RAP course
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m., TBD
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m., TBD, RAP course

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 383 – Gender and Society
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
TBD

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.

SOCIOL 385 – Gender and the Family
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jennifer Lundquist

This course explores the family as a gendered social construction. It considers how the family reflects and reproduces gender roles that are woven into the social norms of our society.  Open to Sociology majors only.  Prerequisite:  A 100-level or 200-level Sociology course.  Eligibility will be removed April 10th. 

SOCIOL 387 – Sexuality and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Amy Schalet
Distribution requirement:  Sexuality studies

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 392D – Social Demography of Sexuality
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Anthony Paik
Distribution requirement:  Sexuality studies

In this course, we will examine several areas of the social demography of sexuality, including theoretical and conceptual developments and patterns of sexual expression, with an emphasis on populations in the  United States.  Specific topics include theoretical perspectives, historical and cross-cultural variation, sexuality across the life course, sexualities and sexual identities, sexually transmitted infections, and the politics of sexuality.

SOCIOL 792B – Gender Seminar
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Joya Misra

The seminar explores current literature in feminist sociology.  Gender is one of the most central axes of inequality, along with class, race, ethnicity, nationality, and sexuality.  Over the past 35 years, feminist scholarship exploded and gendered analyses of almost every social phenomenon exist.  Gender always matters when we are thinking about the social world. Given the limits of a semester, this course will only highlight nine key areas: feminist theory; feminist methods; sexualities; identities and bodies; work and organizations; migration; families and relationships; crime, law, and punishment; and social movements and politics. In addition, these readings are meant to highlight intersectional approaches to gender.  This course focuses primarily on the United States, unlike my advanced course, gender & social policy.

 

Spanish and Portuguese 416 Herter Hall      545-0544

PORTUG 597PW – Women Writers of Portugal
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Jose Ornelas
Distribution requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

This course, open to both graduate and undergraduate students, focuses on female voices of contemporary Portugal as they explore through new discursive strategies issues related to gender construction and the ever-changing socio-historical space. The influence of women writers in shaping Portuguese literary canon. Readings by Agustina Bessa Luis, Fernanda Botelho, Lidia Jorge, Olga Goncalves, Teolinda Geraso, Clara Pinto Correia, Maria Velho da Costa, Maria Gabriels Llansol. Requirements: undergraudates, two papers (7-8 pages); graduates, two papers (10-12 pages). Prerequisites: A reading k nowledge of Portuguese or consent of instructor.