SUMMER 1999 CONTINUING ED SESSION I - JUNE 2 TO JULY 9
SESSION II - JULY 13 - AUGUST 18

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES
(All departmental except 100-level count automatically towards the Women's Studies major. All departmental, including 100-level automatically count towards the Women's Studies minor.)

AFROAM 291A - BLACK WOMEN PLAYWRIGHTS
Session I & II - M-Th 2:00-4:00 p.m.

In the early 1920s, scholar W.E.B. DuBois asserted that black theater should have a specific, political purpose. He believed that it should reflect the histories and sensibilities of black people and their culture; should be written by blacks who understood the experience; and should target the black community as its audience. This course will chart the historical evolution of plays written by black women beginning with the early 1900s and culminating with contemporary works. This historical sweep will allow us to discuss and examine the differences and/or similarities between early and contemporary black feminism, explore how the playwrights reflected their reality, chart how history and social realities influenced their work and their lives as black women, and to see whether or not all of the playwrights shared DuBois' desire to convey a political message through theater. Fulfills Women of Color Requirement for majors and minors.

ENGL 132 - MAN AND WOMAN IN LITERATURE (AL D)
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Examine the degree of change in perceptions of gender measured by literature. Beginning with short selections from ancient writings, then moving in swift leaps through literary time, we examine the roles filled and acted by men and women throughout literary history, attempting to discover the answers which have shaped modern assumptions about gender hierarchies. Ultimately, we attempt to answer, in the context of our literate past, those gender questions that continue to arise today. What does it mean to be a man as we approach the twenty-first century? What does it mean to be a woman?

SOCIOL 106 - RACE, GENDER, CLASS AND ETHNICITY (SB D)
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Introduction to sociology. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to family, occupation, and other aspects of social life.

SOCIOL 222 - THE FAMILY (SB D)
Session I - M-F 11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).

SOCIOL 383 - GENDER AND SOCIETY
Session I & II-T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Analysis of historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men, contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life, and recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.

SOCIOL 387 - SEXUALITY AND SOCIETY (SB D)
Session I - T-Th 1:00-3:30 p.m.

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups. Also includes adolescent sexuality; the invention of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; the medicalization of sexuality; and social theories about how people become sexual.

WOST 187 - INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES (I D)
Session I - T-Th 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Possible section II to be added

Basic concepts and perspectives in Women's Studies, with women's experiences at the center of interpretation. Critical reading and thinking about gender and its interaction with race and class. Focus on women's history and contemporary issues for women.


COMPONENT COURSES
(Students who would like these courses to count towards their major or minor must focus their paper(s) or project(s) on Women's Studies. 100-level courses do not count towards the major but do count towards the minor.)

ANTH 100 - HUMAN NATURE (SB D)
Session I - T-Th 9:30 a.m.-noon

For nonmajors only. Introduces the full range of human cultural and biological diversity. Human evolution, rise and fall of civilizations, non-Western cultures, and the human condition in different societies today. Emphasis on the relationships among biological, environmental, and cultural factors.

ANTH 103 - HUMAN ORIGINS AND VARIATION (BS)
Session I - M-F 11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Session II - M-F 9:30-11 a.m.

The biological aspects of being human. Evolution, how and where the human species originated, and biological similarities and dissimilarities among contemporary human groups. The nature of scientific and anthropological inquiry. With lab.

ANTH 104 - CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND PEOPLE (SB D)
Session II - M-W 6-8:30 p.m.

The nature of culture and its role in creating forms of social, economic, and political life in diverse historical and geographical contexts. Readings drawn from contemporary ethnographies of various peoples, analyzing the persistence of cultural diversity in the midst of global social and socioeconomic forces.

ANTH 106 - CULTURE THROUGH FILM (SB D)
Session I - T-Th 6:30-9 p.m.

Exploration of different societies and cultures, and of the field of cultural anthropology through the medium of film. Ethnographic and documentary films; focus on non-Western cultures and ecological adaptations, gender roles, ethnicity, race, class, religion, politics, and social change. 3 credits.

ANTH 270 - NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS (SB D)
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9 p.m.

Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their lifeways, integrating nature and non-nature information.

COMLIT 131 - BRAVE NEW WORLDS (AL D)
Session II - M-F 9:30-11 a.m.

Utopian and dystopian novels. The ability of literature to generate social critique. Readings include works by Huxley, Orwell, Kafka, Atwood, Burgess, Gibson, Piercy, Gilman, Dick, and others.

COMLIT 141 - GOOD AND EVIL, EAST AND WEST (AL D)
Session II - M-W 6:30-9:00 p.m.

The imaginative representation of good and evil in Western and Eastern classics, folktales, children's stories, and 20th-century literature. Cross- cultural comparison of ethical approaches to moral problems such as the suffering of the innocent, the existence of evil, the development of a moral consciousness and social responsibility, and the role of faith in a broken world.

COMLIT 233 - FANTASY AND WORLD LITERATURE (AL)
Session I T-Th 3:00-5:30 p.m.

Fantasies as escape into strange realms where time and space are not our own. Exploration of fantastic voyages to learn about human desires and dreams, and the reality they grow out of. Interdisciplinary approach; psychological theories of dreams and individual fantasies related to the structure and effects of fantasy literature.

COMLIT 234 - MYTH, FOLK TALE, AND CHILDREN'S LITERATURE (AL)
Session II - M-W 3:00-5:30 p.m.

Reading and analysis of selected traditional European and African folk narratives and of contemporary stories for children from picturebooks to chapter books. Addresses questions of personal and social identity, of narrative presentation and response, of power and authority in changing environments focused on the child.

EDUC 210 - SOCIAL DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION (I D)
*NOTE: TIME CHANGE
Session I - *M-W 5-8 p.m. plus 2 additional days TBA *T-Th 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Session II - *T-W 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.

EDUC 377 - INTRODUCTION TO MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
Variable Session - M-Th 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Variable Session - M-Th 4:00-7:00 p.m.

A basic introduction to the historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of multicultural education. Examine from different theoretical perspectives the nature of intergroup relations in U.S. society; promote the study of the historical and contemporary experiences and contributions of people of color and other under-represented groups; analyze the influence on learning of such sociological variables as race, ethnicity, language, and gender and understand how discrimination translates into school structures, policies, and practices; develop a sound philosophical rationale for multicultural education and examine the role of multicultural education in school reform and social change.

ENGL 202 - MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Course will emphasize some of the major texts, ideas, history, and culture of the British 18th and 19th centuries. We concentrate on some major issues in the history of ideas and the history of literature-sentimentality, reason, the "rise" of the novel, satire, increasing scientific knowledge, "fancy" and imagination, women's rights, romanticism, evolution, mperialism, and loss of faith-all in the context of how the major writers explore, contradict, challenge, and advocate different stances on these issues in some of their major works. Lectures will use various tools: newspaper articles, paintings, conduct books, illustrations, and other major cultural artifacts. Fiction will include Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Austen's Pride and Prejudice, and Bronte's Jane Eyre. Prose will be selected from Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and Darwin's On the Origin of Species. Poets considered will be Pope, Thomas Gray, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Mary Robinson, Tennyson, Robert Browning, and Christina Rosetti.

ENGL 279 - INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES (AL D)
Session II - M-W 1:00-3:30 p.m.

Interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture. Focus on issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Readings drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, philosophy, and fine arts. Supplemented with audio-visual materials-films, slides of paintings, architecture, photography and material culture, and music. Required for students with a concentration in American Studies.

ENGL 339 - FILM AND LITERATURE
Session I - M-Th 9:00-11:00 a.m.

Instead of the traditional approach of reading a book and viewing a film of the same book, this course will focus on the complex processes of representing specific cultural trends or themes in writing and on film. Each week we will explore a social theme through the reading of a novel or story and the viewing of a film. These themes are: marriage/gender, crime, war, racism, politics, and sexuality. Students will view The French Lieutenant's Woman, The Godfather, Schindler's List, To Kill a Mockingbird, All the President's Men, and Tea and Sympathy. Students will read The French Lieutenant's Woman, "The Overcoat," All Quiet on the Western Front, The Bluest Eye, The Prince, and Rubyfruit Jungle. We will work as a group, in intensive class discussion, to answer the question: "How does written narrative organize itself into this world and how does the filmic world organize itself into a narrative?"

POLSCI 171 - INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY (SB)
Session II - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

Introduction to the Western tradition of political theory; focus on particular problems and issues through a reading of classical and nontraditional texts. Topics include political obligation, justice, feminism, individuality, friendship, community, civil disobedience, power, others. Recommended for Political Science majors; not open to senior Political Science majors.

SOCIOL 220 - SOCIOLOGY OF AMERICAN CULTURE
Session I - T-Th 6:30-9:00 p.m.

The elements and dynamics of culture everywhere; special reference to Americana. Topics include culture as a set of historically grounded values and beliefs; culture's role in both expressing and subverting ideals; the frequent gap between ideals and reality. Case studies range from politics to religion, gender to social class, and high art to low funk.


Program Courses
Departmental
Component
Women of Color
Graduate Level
Amherst College
Hampshire College
Mount Holyoke
Smith College