Women's Studies
University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Departmental Courses

Departmental Courses automatically count towards the Women's Studies Major and Minor Requirements.



ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT
215 MACHMER HALL
545-2221

ANTH 205
Inequality and Oppression (SBD)
Bob Paynter
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am
The roots of racism and sexism and issues they raise. The cultural, biological and social contexts of race and gender and examination of the truths and fallacies about biological variation, genetic determinism, human adaptation and the bases of human behavior. Historical influences on our views of how people differ from each other and of overlap among biology, politics, and economics.



ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE DEPARTMENT
26 THOMPSON HALL
545-0886

JAPAN 560
Seminar: Women and Japanese Literature
Doris Bargen
Monday 2:30 - 5:15 pm

Exploration of a variety of Japanese women's issues addressed by both male and female authors in prose and poetry, drama and film. How are women's roles as daughters, lovers, wives, mothers, and professionals culturally constructed? What triggers gender conflict in Japan and how does the balance of power between men and women shift from ancient to modern times? Among the topics of discussion will be female eroticism, women's marital and reproductive problems, and their cultural influence. This course maybe counted toward the Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.



CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
524 HERTER HALL
545-0512/545-5776

CLSICS 335
Women in Antiquity
Elizabeth Keitel
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:05 am

Lives, roles, contributions, and status of women in Greek and Roman societies, as reflected in classical literature and the archaeological record.



COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT
407 MACHMER HALL
545-1311

COMM 895K
Political Communication and Gender
Jane Blankenship
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00- 2:15 pm

See Department for course description.



ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT
1004 THOMPSON HALL
545-0855

ECON 348/
Political Economy of Women
TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

This course uses a wide range of women's issues to teach varied economic principles and theories. Popular women's topics in past semesters include women's increasing labor force participation; gender differences in hiring, promotions, and earnings; the growing poverty rate for female headed households; trade policy effects on women in the US and other countries; and race and class differences in the economic opportunities of women. Empirical assessment of women's work in the market and in the home in the US and other countries. Reconsideration of traditional issues of political economy, comparative economic history, and labor economics.



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
124 FURCOLO HALL
545-0233

EDUC 591L
Women and Oppression
Barbara Love
Tuesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

Course meets 9/17, 9/24, 10/1, 10/8, 10/5, 10/22, 11/5 from 4:00 - 6:30 pm and Saturday 10/26 and Sunday 10/27 from 10am - 10pm. Education students only. Limited enrollment.

EDUC 752
Gender Issues in International Education
David Evans
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00 pm

Examination of the role and status of women in various societies, with emphasis on Third World countries in the process of economic development. Topics will include the effects of the development process on women, women's skills in survival and adaptation, women as preservers of culture, and the effect of education on these processes. Participants will: (1) examine the implications of the development for women in the future, (2) explore methods to analyze women's issues from a political-economic perspective, and (3) identify and critique various approaches which have been used to include women in the development process. Requirements: short initial paper, class presentation, final project/paper.



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
170 BARTLETT HALL
545-2332

ENGL 132
Man and Woman in Literature (ALD)

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include the nature of love, the image of the hero and of the heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. Six sections (including residential program sections), so please check Schedule of Courses. 100 level courses do not count toward Women's Studies major.

ENGL 480/WOST 492A
Women, Race, and Theatre
Jenny Spencer
Monday, Wednesday 3:35 - 5:30 pm

See WOST 492A for course description.

ENGL 497A
Queer Cultures
Deborah Carlin
Monday, Wednesday 1:25 - 3:20 pm

This is an interdisciplinary course in lesbian and gay studies that will range across discourses of psychology, sociology, history, film, fiction, theater, popular culture, anthropology, politics, and philosophy. Its purpose will be to examine and interrogate, from various perspectives, issues pertaining to categories of: Identity Politics; The Closet; Being Out, and Being Outed; Queer Reading: Textuality and Sexuality; Community and Family; Queer Studies, Politics and Representation. The course is designed to familiarize students with the most contemporary writing and thinking taking place in Queer Studies today, and to inspire rigorous thinking about your own positions on diverse topics.

ENGL 497H
Narrating the Body in Modern Fiction (4 cr.)
Laura Doyle
Thursday 9:30 - 12:30 pm

This is a four-credit honors course open to English majors only. Focusing on experimental form in 20th-century fiction, we will ask why these stories are told in such unorthodox ways. Particular attention will be paid to the sexual, racial, class, gender,and bodily determinants of our lives and these stories about them. Readings include Toomer, Stein, Woolf, Jones, Faulkner, Larsen, Yezierska, Morrison, and others.



GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE
510 HERTER HALL
545-2350

GER 363
Witches: Myth and Historical Reality (ID)
Susan Cocalis
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm

[Formerly GER 190A, 390A]. The course will examine the image of the witch and the historical situation of women tried as witches in early modern Europe and colonial New England with reference to contemporary pagan practice . Mythological texts, documentation of witch trials, theories about witchcraft, as well as literary and graphic representation of witches and witch trials. Focus on witches/witch-persecutions in medieval/early modern Europe and 17th century New England in order to de-construct stereotypes about witches and examine aspects of women's sexuality, gender codes, and physical appearance that have been labeled witchcraft. In English.



HISTORY DEPARTMENT
612 HERTER HALL
545-1330

HIST 388
U.S. Women to 1890 (HSD)
Joyce Berkman Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm, plus discussion section

An interdisciplinary and multicultural approach to changes and continuities in women's lives from the pre-colonial era to 1890, focuses on the interplay of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and regionality on the formation of female identity, features impact of American revolution, emergence of industrial capitalism, slavery, and westward expansion on female consciousness, social and cultural gender norms, and women's political behavior.

HIST 697A
Special Topics - US Women's History
Joyce Berkman
Wednesday 7:00 - 10:00 pm

This course focuses on major issues, scholarly debates, and practices of US women's history. Our analysis of gender as a category of interpreting women's past will involve close study of the ways race, social class, ethnicity, religion, regionality, and sexuality transform the role and meaning of gender in women's sense of self and daily lives. I have selected three topics to serve as axes of the course: immigrant women, 1850 to the present; history of contraception and abortion; African-American women's lives. Depending upon the interests of those enrolled in the course we will add another topic or expand on one of the three. Course will meet at my house (66 Cottage St. Amherst) and course requirements include regular participation in class discussions, responsibility for leading one class discussion, one oral presentation, and two essays on three (or four) of the above topics.



JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT
108 BARTLETT HALL
545-1376

JOURN 395A/WOST 395A
Women, Men and Journalism
Karen List
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

See WOST 395A for course description.



LABOR STUDIES
125 DRAPER HALL
545-2884

LABOR 201
Women and Work
TBA
Tuesday 7:30 - 10:00 pm

The role of women at a variety of workplaces from historical, economic, sociological, and political points of view. Among areas considered: discrimination, health care, women in the labor movement and in management, and civil rights legislation.



LEGAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
221 HAMPSHIRE HOUSE
545-0021


LEGAL 491F
Feminist Legal Theory
Dianne Brooks
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Intensive course dealing with issues of law and gender. Uses feminist legal theory, case law and other readings to examine the law's role in the history of gender oppression as well as current issues of law and gender such as reproductive rights, sex discrimination, rape and pornography. Prerequisite: LEGAL 250 or background in women's studies, feminist theory.



NURSING DEPARTMENT
222 ARNOLD HOUSE
545-5092

NURSE 697D
Women's Health Initiative
Helen Carcio
by arrangement

See Department for description. Course limited to matriculated Nursing students only or by permission of instructor.



PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT
352 BARTLETT HALL
545-2330

PHIL 381
Philosophy of Women (SBD)
TBA
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20 pm

General overview of philosophies of women, their role in society and their relation to men. Representative Western philosophers and their views on women, feminist theories of male dominance, and contemporary ethical and political issues: marriage, sexual preference, violence against women, women and work, and differences among women.



POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
318 THOMPSON HALL
545-2438

POLSCI 397X
Politics of Sex
Barbara Cruikshank
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10 am

This course covers the politics of sex and sexual acts (rather than gender politics). We will ask, how does the tradition of political theory deal with the act of sex? How does sex become political? How is sex made governable? What are the roots of the contemporary politics of sex? Is the body politic a sexual body? What is the relation between sexual passion and political passion? Issues will include the incest taboo, prostitution, sexual violence, sexuality, pleasure, disease, and resistance. Prerequisite: POLSCI 171. Optional Honors Section (H01) - Wednesday 1:25 pm.



PSYCHOLOGY
403 TOBIN HALL
545-0377

PSYCH 308
Psychology of Women (SBD)
Carole Beal
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the psychology of women, including a review and evaluation of psychological theories and research about female development and the life experiences that primarily affect girls and women. We will consider the diversity of female experience, as well as common themes that are shared by most women. PRIORITY TO PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS.



SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
710 THOMPSON HALL
545-0427

SOCIOL 106
Race, Sex, and Social Class (SBD)
Pamela Quiroz
Suzanne Model
1A - Monday, Wednesday 11:15 am
plus discussion section
2N - Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

The interaction of race, gender and social class in work, family, daily life, and struggle. Discussion of the effects and experiences of race, gender, and social class on social and economic processes and their relationship to other aspects of social life, including family and occupation. 100 level courses do not count toward Women's Studies major.

SOCIOL 222
The Family (SBD)
Naomi Gerstel
Monday, Wednesday 3:35 pm, plus discussion section

Lecture, discussion. Historical development of the family: changes in household structure, in relations between husband and wife, between parents and children and among extended kin. Social forces shaping the contemporary family, from the choice of a mate, to marriage (both his and hers) and kinship, to parenting (from the perspective of both parents and children), to the diverse endings of marriage. Three exams.

SOCIOL 335
New Left and New Right
Janice Irvine
Monday, Wednesday 11:15-12:30 pm

This course examines social conflict over "family values" with a particular emphasis on sexuality and gender. We will explore the emergence of a politicized Christian fundamentalist movement and examine its coalitions with conservative Catholics, Muslims, and Jews. We will see how this broader religious right movement has launched culture wars over such issues as abortion, sex education, teen pregnancy, and lesbian/gay issues.

SOCIOL 387
Sexuality and Society
Janice Irvine
Monday, Wednesday 9:05 am, plus discussion section

Examines the many ways in which social factors shape our sexuality. In particular, we examine cultural diversity - by such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity - in the ways in which both individuals and social groups organize sexuality. We will explore topics such as: adolescent sexuality, the invention of heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality; the medicalization of sexuality; and social theories about how we become sexual. Three in-class exams.

SOCIOL 393
Gender and Education
Pamela Quiroz
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25 pm

This course examines the academic experiences of girls and women along with the factors affecting female educational attainment. Our focus is on the schooling experiences of girls and women within the US education system with attempts to be inclusive of sexual orientation and racial and ethnic diversity. The course begins with a historical account and sociological analysis of girls' and womens' entry into formal education, providing backdrop within which we examine the contemporary experiences of females from elementary school through the graduate years. We will also touch on women's' status and experiences as educators and professionals in the educational institution. The course uses sociology, history, journalism, etc. to provide an overview of women's placement within the academic structure and the impact of gender on the realization of educational, economical and even social opportunities.

SOCIOL 597A
Gender, Race, and Welfare State Formation
Susan Thistle
Monday 6:30 - 9:00 pm

This course examines how the process of welfare state formation has varied by gender and race. ethnicity in the US. While a central goal is to understand the inadequacy of social policy currently addressing women's poverty, we will approach this through consideration of theories of welfare state formation, (with recognition of the underlying dynamics of industrialization), variation in the timing of movement into the labor force by gender and race/ethnicity, and the history of earlier social policy development in the US, with focus on policy directed at women's domestic tasks.

SOCIOL 720
Sociology of Education
Pamela Quiroz
by arrangement



SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT BUILDING
545-5580

SOM 691F/WOST 591B
Feminist Theory, Organization and Diversity
Ann Ferguson and Marta Calas
Monday 6:00 - 8:30 pm

Seminar will provide an overview of the current debates in feminist theory, particularly with regard to intersectionalities between gender, race, class and sexual domination systems and their effects in organizational contexts. Epistemological and postmodern concerns will be addressed, as well as the implications for analyzing organizational development and change. Some background in feminist theory and/or social theory required.



SOCIAL THOUGHT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY (STPEC)
MACHMER HALL E-27
545-0043

STPEC 394A
Women and Economic Development in Third World
Kanthie Athukorala
Wednesday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

This course will assess the impact of economic development on women's lives in Africa, Asia and Latin America in the '80s. The course will look at (a) theoretical issues surrounding economic development and women's relationship to that process, (b) narrative autobiographical accounts of women about how they have experienced this process, and (c) alternatives to traditional approaches for empowering women and influencing development policy. This course may be counted toward the Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

STPEC 492H
Gender, Race, Class in US History & Society (4 cr.)
Susan Tracy
Monday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

OPEN TO STPEC MAJORS ONLY. This course will examine the social structures and ideologies of gender, race, and class. For instance, when we consider the situation of battered women, we see that all women confront gendered social structures and prejudice. Yet, the experiences of those women and their options vary depending on their race and class. Through the use of examples as the one above, drawn from both history and public policy, we will work to hone our critical skills in analyzing gender, race, and class in American history and society. Students will have the opportunity to develop comprehensive research projects and present their own work for class discussion. Prerequisite: STPEC 391H.



SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE DEPARTMENT
418 HERTER HALL
545-3178

SPAN 309
Spanish-American Women Writers in Translation
Nina Scott
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Lecture, discussion. Introduction to selected works of major Spanish-American women writers, from the Colonial era to the present, and including Latina writers from the United States. Topics include spiritual autobiography, antislavery literature, resistance to terrorism. As Mexican author Laura Esquivel will be on campus in the Spring of 1997, we will focus especially on her novel and film, Like Water for Chocolate. Taught in English, no prerequisites. Requirements: several short papers, one final research paper. This course may be counted toward the Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.

SPAN 497C
Spanish-American Women Writers
Nina Scott
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

Lecture, discussion. Introduction to selected works of major Spanish-American women writers. We will work in a variety of genres (spiritual, autobiography, poetry, drama, novel) and cover topics such as writing by nuns, antislavery and racism, terrorism,the affirmation of the Latina self, etc. We will devote a considerable part of the course to studying the novel and the film Como aqua para Chocolate, as the author, Laura Esquivel, will be on campus in the Spring of 1997. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: two previous advanced courses in Spanish, or by permission of the instructor. Requirements: active participation in class, several papers. This course may be counted toward the Women of Color Requirement for Women's Studies majors and minors.


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