WOMEN’S STUDIES
University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Component Courses

To earn Women’s Studies credit for component courses, students must focus on the applied area of Women’s Studies covered in the course. See the Women’s Studies Program office for more information.
Please note that 100 level courses do not count towards towards the major.

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AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES	
325 NEW AFRICA HOUSE	
545-2751
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AFROAM 101	
Introduction to Black Studies
Ernie Allen
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15-12:30 pm
	
Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the
disciplines covered by Black Studies.  Includes history, the social sciences, and
humanities as well as conceptual framework for investigation and analysis of Black
history and culture. 

AFROAM 111/ARTHIS 111
Survey of African Art  (ATD)
Femie Richards
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am
	
Major traditions in African art from prehistoric times to present. Allied
disciplines of history and archaeology used to recover the early history of certain
art cultures. The aesthetics in African art and the contributions they have made to
the development of world art in modern times. 

AFROAM 132
Afro-American History: 1619-1860 (HSD)	
Manisha Sinha
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Overview of the history of African-Americans from the development of colonial
slavery and the rise of African American communities and culture. Topics include:
African slave trade, slavery, the Black protest tradition including abolitionism;
and the distinct experience of Afro-American women. 

AFROAM 222	
Black Church in America
John Bracey
Tuesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

AFROAM 234	
Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (ALD)
Susan Tracey
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

Survey of African-American literature of the 1920s: fiction, poetry, essays,
folklore. Through the eyes and ideas of the writers, time, place, and
socio-historical and political contexts of 1920s revealed.  Themes include: Harlem
as a symbol; identity of New Negro; and role and responsibility of black writers,
male and female. 

AFROAM 254
Introduction to African Studies  (HSD)
Femie Richards
Monday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

Interdisciplinary introduction to Africa. Historical approach; chronological
sequence from pre-history to contemporary times. Political development and
processes, the arts, ethnography, social structures, economies. 

AFROAM 291C
Black Autobiographies
TBA
Monday, Wednesday 12:20 - 2:30 pm

Major and minor voices, 1831 to the present, including narratives of former slaves
and short and long works by famous leaders, educators and writers including
Washington, Douglass, DuBois, Wright, Baldwin, Himes, Wells, Hurston, Angelou,
Moody, and Davis. Discussions will center on issues such as the nature and
tradition of black autobiography; how time, place and circumstance have affected
form and content; and the responsibility of a representational life vs. the freedom
of individual experience and expression. 

AFROAM 690A/HIST 697G
The Rise of Slavery
Manisha Sinha
Tuesday 3:00 - 5:30 pm

AFROAM 690C
Seminar - The Harlem Renaissance	
Susan Tracey
Monday 11:00 - 1:30 pm

AFROAM 790
Major Works I/II (4 credits)
Esther Terry
Monday, Wednesday 3:30 - 6:00 pm


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ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT	
215 MACHMER HALL
545-2221
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ANTH 104
Culture, Society & People  (SBD)	
Jean Forward
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 1:55 pm, plus discussion section
	
The nature and cause of human cultural diversity. Readings examine how people live
and think about their lives in different societies. Topics include: kinship and
marriage in various cultures, variation in religion and ritual, economic lifeways
of diverse societies, forces of cultural change, sources of inequality, cultural
ecology, social theory. Examples from many different cultures. Optional Honors
Section (H02) offered. 

ANTH 106
Culture Through Film  (SBD)	
Staff
Tuesday 6:30 - 10:30 pm, plus discussion section
	
Exploration of different societies and cultures, and the theories of cultural
anthropology, through films.  Ethnographic and documentary films are used to focus
on a wide array of cultures and to examine such topics as ecological adaptations,
sex roles, ethnicity, religion, politics and social change. The uses of cinema as a
medium of communication and cross-cultural understanding are also considered. No
prerequisites. 

ANTH 397B
Community	
Arthur Keene
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

Comparative, cross-cultural and historical analysis of the forces that build strong
communities and the forces that undermine them. Emphasis on the possibilities for
building. In the late 20th century, diverse, meaningful communities that prioritize
the common good over individual self-interest. Exploration of the celebration of
individualism in US society. Theoretical readings, discussion, and case studies. 

ANTH 397C
Medical Anthropology	
Lynnette Leidy
Monday, Wednesday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Medical anthropology is described as multidisciplinary, holistic, and comparative.
This course will explore five theoretical frameworks which vary in disciplinary
emphasis and holistic perspective (e.g., the ecological vs. political-economic
analysis) to identify factors related to health, illness, and disease and to
determine when particular theoretical perspectives are most useful. In addition,
the question of comparable units in bio-cultural medical inquiry. Optional Honors
Section (H04) offered. 

ANTH 397F
Visual Anthropology	
Jackie Urla
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm
screenings: Wednesdays 6:30 - 8:30 pm

The politics and poetics of visual representation in the field of anthropology,
focusing primarily, but not exclusively on the moving image. Critical examination
of the theoretical frameworks and historical contexts that have informed the
various ways in which human cultures have been represented visually, ranging from
the living museums of world’s fairs, early exploration or travel films, classic
ethnographic film, and public television’s “Disappearing World” series. Students
will examine a variety of documentary, observational, and experimental styles in
both ethnographic film and “indigenous media” and consider how relations of power
and authority are embodied in both forms and cultures. Goal is to better understand
how and under what conditions visual media can hinder or foster the project of
understanding cultural differences. Prerequisite: ANTH 106 recommended. 

ANTH 597A
The Anthropology of Complex Societies	
Bob Paynter
Wednesday 12:20 - 3:20 pm

This course reviews theories and cases of state formation and dissolution from an
anthropological perspective. Particular attention will be paid to the interaction
of material, social, and ideological processes in the dynamic relations of orders
of social inequality. 

ANTH 697B
Multicultural Europe	
Jackie Urla
Monday 7:30 - 10:15 pm


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ART DEPARTMENT
365 FINE ARTS CENTER	
545-1902
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ART 497Q	
Special Topics: Advanced Photography	
Susan Jahoda
Lecture: Wednesday 10:10 - 1:10 pm; lab: Wed. 7-10 pm


ART 793B
Graduate Seminar - Photography	
Susan Jahoda
Tuesday, Thursday 4:30 - 7:30 pm

Graduate Photography majors only. Emphasis on the development of a long-term
project. Readings based on locating the project within contemporary visual
practice. Weekly meetings with peers. 


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ART HISTORY DEPARTMENT	
317B BARTLETT HALL	
545-3595
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ARTHIS 522	
Modern Art, 1880-Present	
Anne Mochon
Monday, Wednesday 12:20 pm, plus discussion section

Focus on movements from Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada,
Surrealism, to post-World War II and contemporary directions from Abstract
Expressionism to Post-Modernism. 

ARTHIS 622
Art Since 1880	
Anne Mochon
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:15 pm


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ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE DEPARTMENT	
26 THOMPSON HALL		
545-0886
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JAPAN 144/COMLIT 152	
Literature: Modern  (ALD)	
Doris Bargen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15 am	

Introduction through translation to Japanese drama, poetry, and prose fiction from
around 1600 to present including linked verse, haiku, the Kabuki, and Bunraku
theatres, and the novels of Saikaku, Soseki, Tanizaki, Mishima, Oe and others.
Special emphasis on the interaction with European literature during the past
century. Readings include several paperbacks. 


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CLASSICS DEPARTMENT	
524 HERTER HALL		
545-0512/545-5776
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CLSICS 224
Greek Mythology  (AL)	
Ed Phinney
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:30 pm

CLSCS 365
World of Greek Drama  (AL)	
Ed Phinney
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm


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COMPARATIVE LITERATURE DEPARTMENT	
303 SOUTH COLLEGE		
545-0929
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COMLIT 121
International Short Story  (AL)	
Sally Lawall
Monday, Wednesday 11:15 am, plus discussion section

Tales and story-telling; the development of the modern short story from Romanticism
to the present.  Fantastic tales, detective plots, character sketches, social
commentary and pure play - all embodied in short texts that give a glimpse into
other worlds. Reading include Russian, German, French, African, English, American,
Argentinean, Italian, Egyptian, and Chinese stories, with some discussion of
cultural context. All works read in translation, although original texts are
available in xerox for those who wish.  LIVE and ON-LINE DISCUSSIONS. The Internet
is an active component of this course, tied in through discussion groups. Students
will use their individual e-mail accounts to post short responses to the stores on
an electronic bulletin board. Requirements: 2-4 page papers with preparatory notes;
one in-class exam; bulletin board responses each week throughout the semester,
class attendance. 

COMLIT 131	
Brave New Worlds  (AL)	
David Lenson
Monday, Wednesday 10:10 plus discussion section

This is a heavy reading course that studies novels presenting and representing
Modernist totalitarian worlds, and Postmodern worlds of fragmentation, diversity
and abandonment. Issues of interest in the current cultural crisis addressed: what
have governments done, what should they do, is individualism tenable in a world of
five billion people, is freedom an absolute condition, what role do art and culture
hope to play in the era of global Consumerism. Gender issues as part of larger
political visions emphasized.  Readings include: Huxley, Brave New World and
Island; Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and A Scanner Darkly, Gibson,
Neuromancer; Winterson, Oranges are Not the Only Fruit;  Atwood, The Handmaid’s
Tale; Butler, Parable of the Sower; Stephenson, Snow Crash, Piercy, Woman on the
Edge of Time, etc. 

COMLIT 152/JAPAN 144	
Japanese Literature: Modern	
Doris Bargen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15 am	

See Japan 144 for course description.

COMLIT 381
Avante-Garde Film 
Don Levine
Monday 3:35 - 6:35 pm, plus discussion section

Explores modern origin of experimentation in film in avant-garde modes such as Expressionism, 
Surrealism and contemporary results of this heritage. Trying to determine if film is the most resolutely 
modern of the media, we’ll look at cinema as the result of two obsessive concerns: 1) the poetic, 
dreamlike, and fantastic, 2) the factual realistic and socially critical or anarchistic. Thus we’ll attempt to 
discover how modern culture deals with avant-garde imperatives to always “make it new”. Films such as 
Breathless (Godard), Pickpocket (Bresson), Barton Fink, My Own Private Idaho.

COMLIT 491A/ITALIAN 490S 
Italian-American Film: The Psychopathology of Everyday Violence 
Jennifer Stone 
Lecture/Screenings: Tuesday 7:00 - 10:00 pm 
Discussion:
Wednesday 11:15 am or 12:20 pm

Studies films made by Italian-American directors who are influenced by Italian
neo-realism and other European traditions. Also charts accomplishments of
Italian-American actors. Key directors from the East Coast School (Scorsese,
DeNiro, Ferrara) are contrasted with those whose work is derived from the Hollywood
code (Coppola, Leone, Tarantino). The problem of “everyday violence” which
dominates these filmmakers is examined from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective
in terms of paranoia, psychosis or the alternative of healthy sublimation.
Questions of genre (the Western mythology), urban seriality and European
immigration are explored in terms of identity and psychopathology. Italian
directors engaged in Hollywood genres and American exploiting Italian characters
are exposed (Wertmuller, Jarmusch, Leone). Films selected from Italian-American,
The Big Shave, Whose That Knocking At My Door? American Boy, Mean Streets, The Last
Waltz, Raging Bull, New York Stories, The Conversation, Dementia 13, Rumble Fish,
True Romance, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Fistful of Dollars, The Good, the Bad,
and the Ugly, Once Upon a Time in America, A Bronx Tale, The Bad Lieutenant, Belle
Starr Story, Down by Law, etc. 

COMLIT 695A
International Film Noir
Don Levine
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

COMLIT 752
Theory and Practice of Comparative Literature
Sally Lawall
Wednesday 1:25 - 4:05 pm

Examination of current issues in Comparative Literature: their relation to
contemporary intellectual debates, and their roots in the history of the
discipline. Topics include translation theory and practice;  perspectives on the
canon and cultural literacy, cultural and intercultural studies; literary
interrelations and polysystems theory; debates over “literature” and “Comparative
Literature”; gender theory; reading theories; feminist perspectives;
interdisciplinary approaches (e.g. film, psychoanalysis); genre theory;  and the
institution of Comparative Literature: its research and pedagogy, its role in
higher education, and the job market. All faculty in Comparative Literature direct
a two-hour seminar that draws on their own research interests and specialization,
related to the general concerns of the course.
	
COMLIT 895A
Dissertation Research Seminar	
Cathy Portuges
Wednesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm


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COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT	
407 MACHMER HALL		
545-1311
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COMM 287
Advertising as Social Communication
Sut Jhally
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 3:35 - 5:30 pm

Lecture. This is NOT a course in HOW to advertise. It does not approach advertising
from a practitioner’s viewpoint. This course looks at advertising from the
viewpoint of SOCIAL THEORY, that is, of how we can understand advertising’s broad
political, economic, social, and cultural role in modern society. The course will
broadly examine the social role of advertising in consumer societies with a central
focus on advertising’s mediation of the modern person/object relationship, the
satisfaction of needs, the constitution of popular culture, and the process of
socialization. A wide-ranging theory locating advertising as a crucial institution
at the intersection of media, popular culture, and industry will be developed. 

COMM 412
Political Communication
Jane Blankenship
Tuesday 9:30 - 10:45 am, plus discussion section

How “political reality” is constructed through communication. Examination of some
key communication variables involved in electoral campaigns and governance, and how
these variables interact with one another. The course also examines the rhetorical
functions of the presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court. The majority of
examples examined will be from national campaigns and governance. 

COMM 491A
Seminar - Media Criticism	
Briankle Chang
Tuesday 6:00 - 9:00 pm

Examination of films and television programs as cultural artifacts from several critical perspectives. Film 
and television are central purveyors of beliefs and values within our culture, and they function both to 
transmit and shape these values and beliefs in ways that are subject to critical analysis. General 
examination of film/television as socio-cultural texts and progress to such specific critical perspectives as 
genre criticism, feminist criticism, ideological criticism, and subcultural criticism. COMM seniors only.

COMM 494F/COMM 694F	
Seminar - Mediation	
Leda Cooks
Tuesday 4:00 - 7:00 pm

Focus is on mediation both as a process (communicative practice) and a product of
the larger social/cultural/political context. Several theoretical approaches to the
process of mediation will be explored as will the social/cultural/political issues
around the conceptualization of alternative dispute resolution. Some training in
mediation will be provided and seminar participants will observe several mediation
sessions. Additionally, students will get experience writing grant proposals for a
community mediation project and co-facilitating a conflict and non-violence project
for at-risk youth. COMM Seniors only. 

COMM 494P
Seminar - Advanced Popular Culture	
Lisa Henderson
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Optional Honors Colloquium H03 offered. See Department for course description. COMM
seniors only. 

COMM 594B
Communication of Trauma	
Hannah Kliger
Monday, Wednesday 1:25 - 2:40 pm

The role of communication in the lives of individuals and communities who live
through highly stressful, traumatic events. Exploration of how communication helps
to define the extent, nature, and intensity of the effects of traumatic
experiences. For example, how do mass media reports influence the way in which we
experience events ranging from natural disasters and wars to personal tragedies and
painful historical memories. In addition, we will examine the process by which the
lessons of trauma are communicated from one generation to the next to see the wide
range of consequences that are evident within populations that have experienced
traumatic life changes. An important theme through the course will be the
challenges facing the communication researcher who encounters these issues.
Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students only. 

COMM 794V
Field Research in Media and Cultural Studies	
Lisa Henderson
Wednesday 6:35 - 9:30 pm


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CONSUMER STUDIES DEPARTMENT
101 SKINNER HALL
545-2391
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CS 157
Survey of Costume History  (HS)	
Pat Warner
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Survey of Western Dress from antiquity to 1980. Students will study the societal
significance of dress and how it has reflected gender roles, and the social,
economic, political influences affecting clothing change. They will acquire
recognition of historic periods and fashions throughout history. 

CS 297A
Child, Family, and Community	
Maureen Perry-Jenkins
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

The connection between child, family, and community represents the survival of
humankind in that children are nurtured by their families, and families are
supported by their communities. The goal of this course is to examine the multiple
contexts in which children develop (e.g. families, schools, neighborhoods), the
relationships of people in those contexts, and the interactions that take place
within and between contexts. These issues will be examined in light of changing
demographic, social and economic trends of the 1990s that challenge the ability of
families and communities to support and nurture children. 

CS 355
Contemporary Fashion Analysis
Susan Michelman
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

Historical, social, and aesthetic analysis of 20th-century fashions. Focus on
development of fashion trends and forces which shape the movement of fashion.
Optional Honors Colloquium (H03) offered. 

CS 596B	
Ind. Study - Graduate Fashion Analysis 	
Susan Michelman
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm, plus by arrangement

Meets with CS 355. Variable credits (1-6). See Department for course information. 


CS 597B
Dress, Gender, and Culture	
Susan Michelman
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

An interdisciplinary and cross-cultural exploration of dress as one of the most
significant markers of gender identity. Students will analyze this relationship by
studying ethnographic areas ranging from Asia, Europe, Africa, to North and South
America. Current research will be examined as well as studies based on historical
data. Prerequisites: CS 155 or permission of instructor. Juniors, Seniors, and
Graduate Students only. 

CS 692A
Graduate Seminar (1 credit)	
Pat Warner
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm


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ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT	
1004 THOMPSON HALL	
545-0855
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ECON 105
Introduction to Political Economy (SBD)	
Rick Wolff
Monday, Wednesday 11:15 - 12:05 pm, plus discussion section

Introduction to economic analysis for majors and nonmajors. Facts and concepts
basic to understanding the US Economy today.  Topics include:  unemployment,
economic development, inequality, technology, economic policy, economic
alternatives, and discrimination.  Contrasting theoretical perspectives. 

ECON 144
Political Economy of Racism  (SBD)	
Lisa Saunders
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

The interaction between economics and racial discrimination.  The economic history
of race relations and the economic experience of non-whites in the US conservative,
liberal, and radical views of discrimination evaluated.  Policy questions and
current issues discussed. 

ECON 190L
Introduction to Latin America and Latino Economic Issues (SBD)
Carmen Diana Deere
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Focus on the current economic problems facing Latin American and Caribbean
countries and Latinos in the US. The interconnection between the two is
international migration, and how, in addition, increased trade and financial flows
have integrated the destinies of the peoples of the hemisphere. Policies addressed
include: the relationship between the debt crisis in Latin America and increased
migration to the US; the impact of NAFTA and the Caribbean Basin Initiative on the
region and on Latino communities in the US; have Latinos lost jobs as US investment
moves into Mexico; how has Puerto Rico fared with the development of free trade
zones throughout the Caribbean; and, how would a possible lifting of the embargo on
Cuba and renewed trade affect other Caribbean countries as well as migration to the
US. Introduction to the use of basic economic data; no previous study of economics
is required. 

ECON 305
Marxian Economics	
Steve Resnick
Monday, Wednesday  3:35 - 4:50 pm

An overview of Marxian economics as an alternative way to see and analyze the
problems of capitalist economic systems, and recent interdisciplinary work -
combining feminist and marxist approaches. 

ECON 366
Economic Development	
TBA
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Theories of economic growth and development applied to Third World Countries.
Topics include the meaning of “development”, agricultural growth, trade and
industrialization policy, and external debt. 

ECON 371
Comparative Economic Systems	
Diane Flaherty
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

Evaluation of the performance of alternative economic systems, in theory and
practice .The problems of planning in the advanced economies of the US, Western
Europe, the former Soviet Union. 

ECON 742/LABOR 742
Labor and Employment Law	
Pat Greenfield
Wednesday 9:00 - 12:00 pm


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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION	
124 FURCOLO HALL
545-0233
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EDUC 210
Social Diversity in Education (ID)	
Staff
Residential Education Course

Issues of social group identity and diversity. Social oppression by race, gender,
religion, and physical or mental ability. Many sections (including residential
program sections), so please check Schedule of Courses for locations, times, and
instructor. Not open to freshmen. 

EDUC/PubHl 213
Peer Health Education I	
Gloria DiFulvio
Thursday 9:00 - 11:30 am

See Public Health 213 for course description.

EDUC/PubHl 214
Peer Health Education II	
Sally Damon
Wednesday 2:00 - 4:30 pm

See Public Health 214 for course description.

EDUC 294T
Seminar- Intro. to Native American Education	
Tavares
Tuesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

____________________________

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING SOCIAL ISSUES (EDUC 392)COURSES WILL MEET FOR ONE 
WEEKEND SESSION ON THE DATES LISTED BELOW FROM 9 AM TO 5 PM. THERE IS A 
MANDATORY ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING FOR ALL SECTIONS ON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 
IN THE CAMPUS CENTER AUDITORIUM FROM 7:00 - 9:30 PM STUDENTS WILL NOT BE 
ADMITTED TO THE COURSE IF THEY DO NOT ATTEND THIS SESSION.

EDUC 392D	
Racism  (1 credit)	
H. Zuniga
Saturday 11/16 and Sunday 11/17.

EDUC 392E	
Sexism   (1 credit)	
Barbara Love
Saturday 11/23 and Sunday 11/24.

EDUC 392F
Jewish Oppression   (1 credit)	
Barbara Love
Sunday 10/20 and Sunday 10/27.

EDUC 392G
Disability Oppression  (1 credit)	
Pat Griffin
Saturday 9/28 and Sunday 9/29.

EDUC 392K
Classism  (1 credit)	
H. Zuniga
Saturday 10/5 and Sunday 10/6.

EDUC 392L
Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual Oppression  (1 credit)	
Pat Griffin
Saturday 11/2 and Sunday 11/3.
__________________________________

EDUC 395L	
Peer Education - Sexual Harassment	
Monique Fordhan and Craig Alimo
Tuesday, Thursday 3:00 - 4:30 pm

EDUC 462
Teaching Elementary Science	
Klaus Schultz
Wednesday 1:00 - 3:30 pm

In the process of learning science concepts through the eyes of children,
reflecting on our own learning and that of others, one significant component
concerns how gender and gender role expectations interact with learning science.
The course is hands-on and discussion-oriented. Assignments consist of
observations, projects, and reflective writings. Assessment is based on these
assignments. Primarily for prospective teachers, but also for prospective
“informal” teachers such as parents, and for students of learning. Mandatory
Pass/Fail. Priority to ETEP III students. Contact Department to add course. 

EDUC 497D
Creative Arts for the Young Child (2 credits)	
Meg Barden Cline
lecture 1: Thursday 2:30 - 3:40 pm
lecture 2: Thursday 4:00 - 5:40 pm (post B.A. and Graduate Students only)

EDUC 505
Documentary Filmmaking for Education	
Liane Brandon
Wednesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

This introductory course provides students, teachers, human service workers,
educational professionals and others with practical filmmaking experience and
skills to document aspects of their research, programs, interests and educational
endeavors.  Students make three short documentary films during the semester. 

EDUC 539
Using Film and Video in Education	
Liane Brandon
Tuesday  4:00 - 6:30 pm

Explores the use of creative and relevant films and videos in educational settings;
to examine the visual, psychological and technical methods used by video and
filmmakers to convey their messages; and to suggest a variety of techniques for
structuring discussions in the classroom.  Emphasis on developing critical,
aesthetic, and social media awareness, and on examining films and videos for their
cultural and historical perspectives and biases, as well as their messages in
regard to gender, race, age, language etc. 

EDUC 591A
Seminar - Indigenous Education	
Deidre Almeida
Tuesday 9:30 - 12:00 pm

EDUC 592C	
Family, School & Community	
Meg Barden Cline
Wednesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

This course is designed to explore the problems and strengths of contemporary
families and teachers and ways they can work together within community to help
young children. Particular emphasis will be given to families with children with
handicaps and families of diverse ethnic and cultural background.  [This course was
formerly called Parents Role in Day Care]. Priority given to Education majors. 

EDUC 594A
Rsh/Play Iss Ltno	
M. Fray-Ramos
Wednesday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

EDUC 605
Counseling Psychology I
Allen Ivey
Monday 4:00 - 6:30 pm

Counseling skills in a multicultural context. The first third of the course focuses
on listening skills;  students will generate a training program in which they will
teach others basic skills. The remainder of the course focuses on action skills of
interviewing and the treatment plan. Students are expected to present a transcript
of a full counseling interview. The skills will be viewed in a multicultural and
gender context. 

EDUC 691X 
Contemporary Issues in Native America	
Deidre Almeida
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:30 pm 

EDUC 694S 
Seminar: Multi-Cultural Counseling	
Allen Ivey
Tuesday 12:45 - 3:45 pm

EDUC 747
Family Therapy I	
Jeanine Roberts
Tuesday 9:00 - 12 pm

HUMDEV 680
Multicultural Adult Development 	
Maurianne Adams
Thursdays  4:00 - 6:30 pm


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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT	
170 BARTLETT HALL		
545-2332
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ENGL 290B
American Identities	
Judith Fryer
Lecture 1: Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm; ENGL majors only
Lecture 2: Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm; ENGL majors only

Explores the ways literature participates in the definition of national identity.
Pairs canonical and noncanonical texts across genres and historical periods.
Readings focus on ways American issues of creed, class, status, gender, self and
community, possession and dispossession, nationhood and ethnicity, and language
have contributed to American identities. Prerequisite: ENGLWP 112, or equivalent. 

ENGL 376H
American Ethnic Fiction (4 credit Honors course)	
Deb Carlin
Monday, Wednesday 11:15 - 1:10 pm

ENGL 708
Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales	
Arlyn Diamond
Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30 pm

An examination of the tales as a literary collection and a cultural document.  How
does Chaucer represent the social conflicts - e.g. about religion, marriage, youth
vs. age, the role of women, honor and violence - which generate the tales?  What is
his literary and historical context? Open to English Grad.  Students only. 

ENGL 761
History of Literary Criticism
Laura Doyle
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:45 pm

Study of a wide range of theoretical and critical approaches and several of the
philosophical texts from which contemporary theory draws its inspiration.
Discussion will consistently return to the questions” what is the subject?”” and
“what are the implications of the critiques of the subject in western thought?”
Readings range from Descartes and Hegel to Benhabib, Butler, Foucault, Derrida,
Armstrong, and others. Open to English Grad. Students only. 

ENGL 780
Imaginative Writing: Poetry
Dara Weir
Thursday 11:15 - 2:15 pm

Close reading of students’ work-in-progress; discussion of contexts’ influence on
reading, writing, revising; supplementary reading list given to each participant
after first conference. Open to MFA students only. 


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FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT	
224 HOLDSWORTH
545-6641
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NAREST 205
Introduction to Outdoor Recreation	
David Loomis
Monday, Wednesday 12:20 - 2:15 pm

Characteristics, trends, scope; providers and users of outdoor recreation areas,
facilities and services, administrative tools, and outdoor recreation policy. 


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FRENCH AND ITALIAN STUDIES 	
316 HERTER HALL
545-2314
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ITALIAN 490S/COMLIT 491A
Italian-American Film: The Psychopathology of Everyday Violence
Jennifer Stone
Lecture/Screenings: Tuesday 7:00 - 10:00 pm
Discussion: Wednesday 11:15 am or 12:20 pm

See ComLit 491A for course description. 


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GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT	
236 MORRILL 		
545-1535
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GEOG 660/794J
Seminar  - Industrial Geography	
Julie Graham
Tuesday 2:30 - 5:15 pm


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GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE	
510 HERTER HALL
545-2350
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GERMAN 304
From Berlin to Hollywood  (AT)	
Barton Byg
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00 - 2:15 pm
Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 or 10:00 pm (screenings)

From the days of the silent film to the “New German Cinema,” films from Germany
have had great international influence, particularly on the popular culture of the
US. The course will provide a survey of pre-war German cinema, including the great
directors who emigrated to the US, such as Lang, Murnau and Lubitsch. Then the
successors to this Golden Age will be discussed: the Nazi cinema, post-war cinema
in both German states, the recent “second Americanization” of German film and
prospects after unification. 

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HISTORY DEPARTMENT	
612 HERTER HALL
545-1330
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HIST 363
The Civil War Era	
Steve Oates
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm	

HIST 397C
Special Topics - Natl Colnl Africa	
Joye Bowman
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

HIST 491H
Civil War/Fiction (3 credit Honors course)	
Steve Oates
Monday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

HIST 591A
Seminar - The Scramble for Africa	
Joye Bowman
Tuesday 1:00 - 3:45 pm

HIST 591B
Seminar - Islamic Revolutionary Movements	
Yvonne Haddad
Tuesday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

HIST 697C
Special Topics - Consumer Society	
Kathy Peiss
Thursday 9:00 - 12:00 pm

HIST 697G/AFROAM 690A
The Rise of Slavery
Manisha Sinha
Tuesday 3:00 - 5:30 pm


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JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT	
108 BARTLETT HALL
545-1376
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JOURN 393B
Seminar - Philosophy of Journalism	
Nick McBride
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

JOURN 397E
Seminar - Special Topics - Art of the Essay	
Madeleine Blais
Monday 11:15 - 2:15 pm

JOURN 492M 
Seminar - Magazine Writing  (4 credits)	
Sara Grimes
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

JOURN 493A
Seminar - Advocacy Journalism	
Nick McBride
Tuesday Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Open to Journalism majors only. See Department for course description.

JOURN 497B
Seminar - Diaries, Memoirs & Journals  (4 cr.)	
Madeleine Blais
Monday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

JOURN 497P
News: Illusion, Myth and Reality  	
Sara Grimes
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Examines the critical evaluations of the news media in the US: that they are unable
for systemic reasons to reproduce reality; that they are primarily a propaganda
force; and that they have increasingly adopted traditional forms of drama and thus
provide “mediated soap operas” rather than objective news. 

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JUDAIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES 	
744 HERTER HALL		
545-2550
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JUDAIC 192A 	
From Hester Street to Annie Hall: The Jewish
Experience in 20th Century America through Film  (1 cr.)
Saul Perlmutter
Wednesday 3:35 pm; meets at Hillel House

This course will use film to explore major themes and issues in American Jewish
life: tradition vs.  change, anti-Semitism, quest for meaning, women’s roles,
intermarriage, the family, and creative continuity. Popular films as well as
documentaries will be shown and discussed. 

JUDAIC 192B
Right Livelihood in the Jewish Tradition  (1 cr.)	
Dean Cycon
Monday 3:35 pm; meets at Hillel House

Examines the Jewish commitment to participate in the repair and healing of the
world, and compare and contrast that commitment with other religious traditions.
Many aspects of Jewish tradition hold out the possibilities of a better world. How
can the calling of Judaism to “heal the world” be manifest in today’s society? How
do political, social, and environmental concerns reflect underlying spirituality?
Is it possible to make a living in the world while maintaining heartfelt
commitments to family, community, and spirit? 

JUDAIC 335
Jewish Ethics	
Phil Cohen
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm

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LANDSCAPE AND REGIONAL PLANNING 	
206 HILLS NORTH
545-2255
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REGPL 591H
Seminar - Housing and Community Planning	
Ellen Pader
Monday, Wednesday 10:10 - 12:05 pm

REGPL 693S	
Planning for Multiple Publics	
Ellen Pader
Tuesday 6:00 - 9:00 pm

Explores the social, cultural, and political underpinnings and implications of
planning practice and theory.  The course focuses on appropriate planning for
different social groups, the relation of planning and policy to social change and
research methodologies. 

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LABOR STUDIES	
125 DRAPER HALL
545-2884
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LABOR 742/ECON 742
Labor and Employment Law	
Pat Greenfield
Wednesday 9:00 - 12:00 pm

Overview and analysis of public policy pertaining to labor relations law and
protective labor legislation. 

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LEGAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT	
221 HAMPSHIRE HOUSE
545-0021
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LEGAL 397B
Legal Reelism
Dianne Brooks
Thursday 6:00 - 9:00 pm

The ways law is portrayed in popular cultural formats, with emphasis on popular
film and television.  Critical works in the areas of television theory, legal
theory, and cultural studies used to discuss the ways in which ideas about the law
are presented to mass audiences and how those ideas are received and processed. 

LEGAL 397I
Special Topics - Alternative Dispute Resolution
Leah Wing
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30 pm

This course examines the alternative dispute resolution (ADR) movement and focuses
primarily on mediation. The course is taught with feminist critiques of both the US
judicial system and ADR. Case studies focus on racial and gender issues they
influence and intersect, moral decision-making, approaches to conflict resolution,
and the dynamics of oppression and conflict. 

LEGAL 397U
Special Topics: Due Process and Criminal Trial	
Judd Carhart
Tuesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

LEGAL 491L
Seminar - Issues in Labor Law & Policy	
John Bonsignore
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25 pm

LEGAL 497C
Civil Rights Law, Pre-Brown	
Jerrold Levinsky
Wednesday 7:00 - 9:30 pm

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POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT	
318 THOMPSON HALL
545-2438
----------------------------------------

POLSCI 163
Introduction to Civil Liberties	
John Brigham
Tuesday, Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Lecture, discussion. A survey of constitutional rights to free expression,
equality, and due process;  attention to contemporary policy issues such as
pornography, sex discrimination, and student rights. 

POLSCI 280 
Introduction to Public Policy (SB)
John Hird
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00 - 5:15 pm

Introduction to contemporary US public policy analysis, and various perspectives on
public policy including economic efficiency, equity, and political/organizational
feasibility. Emphasis on evaluating the impacts of specific public policy changes.
Application may include environmental policy, affirmative action, international
trade policy, industrial policy, education policy, immigration policy, welfare
policy, etc. 

POLSCI 297C
Cultural Theory and Politics	
Barbara Cruikshank
Monday, Wednesday 3:35 - 4:50 pm

This course approaches the traditional topics of political inquiry: (freedom,
power, conflict and change, equality) in the domain of culture. The politicization
of culture (culture wars, sex wars, English-Only, etc.) comes out of the political
commitments of both the left and the right. At the same time that cultural
conflicts are proliferating, our ability to subject cultural conflict to political
solutions is questionable.  Culture will be treated as a domain of politics and
power, a domain constituted by politics and power, even though it is a domain
resistant to deliberate political reform. We will examine how the location and
conceptualization of politics itself is transfigured into cultural politics (e.g.
“family values” policy, “politics of representation,” and “culture of poverty”. 

POLSCI 343/643	
Government and Politics of East Africa	
Carlene Edie
Tuesday, Thursday  9:30 - 10:45 am

Understanding of the essential patterns of political phenomena in contemporary East
Africa. Primary emphasis given to Kenya and Tanzania. After independence, these two
countries chose substantially different paths of development. Kenya chose a
capitalistic approach, and for that reason has sometimes been viewed as a
“neocolonial” state. Tanzania chose a socialist course of development, and has
often been referred to as “less dependent” upon the West. Examination of approaches
in depth, assessing their merits and shortcomings. Strategies adopted reflect
problems faced by developing nations, so review has broader relevance for study of
many states in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean.  No previous
coursework on Africa presumed or required; introductory coursework in Political
Science desirable. 

POLSCI 345/645
Government and Politics of the Caribbean
Carlene Edie
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00 - 2:15 pm

Focus on the English-speaking Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and Grenada.
Analysis of the political institutions, processes and movements which give
expression to the forces at work in these societies, especially those of class,
ethnicity, and relations of production. Regional economic integration and political
federation examined: the utility or otherwise of CARICOM, failure of West Indies
federation, etc. 

POLSCI 353	
Representations of War and Peace	
James Der Derian
Monday, Wednesday 2:30, plus discussion section
screenings: Wednesday 7:00 - 9:00 pm

Understandings of war and peace in historical and contemporary political thought.
How war is explained in the works of many thinkers, male and female, past and
present. Peace movements, strategies, and theories; war theory and war fighting
doctrines. Historic images of the male soldier-citizen and warrior and the female
embodying anti-militaristic values. Diversity of perspective. Optional Honors
Section (H04) offered. 

POLSCI 367/697	
The Supreme Court	
John Brigham
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 am

This has been a male institution until recently. Its institutional links to male
dominant society are part of what we study as are the changes brought by recent
appointments. Description and interpretation of the US Supreme Court as a modern
institution with attention to its constitutional foundations, traditional practices
and political significance, consequences of opinions for public policy. Two or
three tests, optional paper. 

POLSCI 370
Ancient Political Thought	
Pat Mills
Monday, Wednesday 12:20 pm, plus discussion section

Concentration on the emergence of political theory in the texts of Plato,
Aristotle, and Sophocles, through a focus on the following issues: the relation
between ethics and politics, justice and the law;  individual conscience and
political obligation or obedience; reason and the ideal republic; the relation
between knowledge and virtue; the position of women in ancient thought. The
importance of ancient political ideas and ideals for the contemporary world will
also be addressed. Optional Honors Section (H05) offered. 

POLSCI 397A
Citizens and the American State	
Laura Jensen
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

An examination of the meaning of American citizenship and the principle means of
political participation by which citizens influence state actors; political
parties, campaigns and elections, interest groups, and social movements.
Implications of the rise of “private” communities and governing structures in the
US. 

POLSCI 792A	
Issues of Political Theory	
Pat Mills
Monday 2:30 - 5:00 pm

POLSCI 793A	
Afro-American Sociological and Political Thought	
Dean Robinson
Wednesday 1:25 - 3:20 pm

POLSCI 79X	
TBA	
Pat Mills


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PSYCHOLOGY		
403 TOBIN HALL			
545-0377
----------------------------------------

PSYCH 217
The Psychology of Good and Evil	
Ervin Staub
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Lecture. Important forms of kindness and cruelty (helping and harming among
individuals like sexual, youth and other types of violence; generosity, everyday
kindness, or heroic rescue of people in danger, and lives of moral commitment;
violence between groups like genocide, ethnic conflict, war and police violence).
Historical conditions, cultures, personal characteristics that lead to altruism and
aggression, kindness or cruelty. Differentiation between “us” and “them”,
devaluation, scapegoating, hate; the role of ideology; prosocial values, empathy,
feelings of responsibility. Socialization in the home and in schools, experience
with peers, culture promoting kindness or cruelty. 

PSYCH 660
Advanced Social Psychology	
Ronnie Janoff-Bulman
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm

PSYCH 891F
Psychology of Social Conflict	
Ronnie Janoff-Bulman
Thursday 2:30 - 5:30 pm


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PUBLIC HEALTH		
106 ARNOLD HOUSE		
545-6883
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PUBHL 129
Health Care for All: Myths and Realities (SBD)	
Paula Stamps
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 pm, plus discussion

Major environmental issues including air pollution, acid rain, water contamination,
solid waste disposal including recycling and incineration, and food sanitation.
Emphasis on defenses of the human body and how environmental pollutants may break
down these defenses and produce disease. 

PUBHL 213/EDUC 213
Peer Health Education I	
Gloria DiFulvio
Thursday 9:00 - 11:30 am

Students participate in campus outreach projects while learning specific
information on the primary health issues for college students; alcohol and other
drug use, sexual decision-making, contraception, prevention of sexually transmitted
diseases, eating disorders and stress management techniques. Class involves
personal health assessment such as a personal alcohol and drug survey, small group
discussions, guest lectures, role playing, team building and public speaking
exercises. Class size limited to 20. Students must complete an application and
interview process for admission to the Peer Health Education Program. This course
is the first course in a year-long academic course. 

PUBHL 214/EDUC 214	
Peer Health Education II	
Sally Damon
Wednesday 2:00 - 4:30 pm

Utilizing skills and information from PubHl 213, students are prepared to conduct
educational programs in the residence halls and Greek areas Significant group
facilitation, workshop presentation and health education program planning training.
Campus outreach projects include World AIDS Day, Safe Spring Break, Designated
Driver, and Safer Sex Campaigns. Advanced peers serve as mentors to the first
semester peer health educations, and may elect to continue in the program through
independent study credit. 


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SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT	
710 THOMPSON HALL	
545-0427
----------------------------------------

SOC 224
Social Stratification	
Susan Thistle
Monday, Wednesday 3:35 - 4:50 pm

An in-depth examination of class inequality in the contemporary US, with attention
to the disadvantages experienced by minorities and women. Both conservative and
liberal responses to inequality will be considered.  An additional goal of the
course is that students improve their writing skills. Requirements: two exams, and
a final paper. 

SOC 241
Criminology	
Anthony Harris
Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 10:45 pm

Survey of the extent, causes, and costs of crime in the US, including the
measurement of crime, the social and economic characteristics of offenders,
changing patterns of criminal behavior, theories of causation, and public reactions
to crime, with special attention to issues involving deterrence and the criminal
justice system. Also, corporate crime, the relationships between gender, race and
crime, the insanity defense, and capital punishment. 

SOCIOL 332
Social Change in China	
Suzanne Model
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

This course examines contemporary China from the perspective of social and economic
inequality.  Following a brief overview of the traditional Chinese social order,
the agenda shifts to the present day, asking: in what ways have inequalities
increased under Communist rule and in what ways have inequalities decreased? The
main focus is on three sources of contemporary inequality: place of residence
(rural vs. urban), gender (male vs. female), and social class (elites and masses).
Optional Honors Section (H04) examines modern China as presented in Chinese film.
The movies to be shown include My Favorite Concubine, Raising the Red Lantern, and
The Blue Kite, to name a few. Participants will write short analytic papers linking
contemporary Chinese society to contemporary Chinese cinema.  Any student enrolled
in SOCIOL 332 is eligible to join this honors section. Honors Section (H04) meets
every other Tuesday,7-9 pm. 

SOCIOL 392
Special Topics in Criminology
Anthony Harris
Wednesday 1:25 - 4:25 pm

A seminar focusing on one major theoretical issue in contemporary criminology.
Possible semester-long topics include: problems in defining and measuring crime:
the causes of criminal behavior; the relationships between gender ,race, class, and
crime; the nature and extent of bias in the US criminal justice system; the causes
of violent crime. Requirements: two 8-10 page papers. Prerequisite: SOC 241 and
permission of instructor. 

SOCIOL 442
Sociology of Medicine	
Janice Irvine
Tuesday, Thursday 11:15 

Literature on health and illness from three sociological perspectives: 1)
epidemiological - focus on social and psychological factors as causes of disease;
2) illness-behavior perspectives - focus on variation between persons and groups in
their evaluations and response to pain and symptoms; and 3) organizational -
emphasis on problems in organization and delivery of medical services. 

SOCIOL 792A
Race and Ethnicity	
Deidre Royster
Wednesday 6:30 - 9:00 pm


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SOCIAL THOUGHT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY (STPEC)	
E 27 MACHMER HALL	
545-0043
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STPEC 491H	
Third World Film: Theory and Practice (4 cr.)	
Beheroze Shroff
Wednesday 11:15 - 12:45 pm
screenings: Wednesday 5:30 - 8:00 pm

Study of a representative selection of films from Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
Analysis of resistance strategies of film makers Zhang Yimou from the P.R.C.,
Ousmane Sembene from Senegal and Humerto Solas from Cuba among others. Essays and
articles on Third Cinema (people of color in the US, UK, and Europe) film theory,
gender issues, social and political issues will be discussed in relation to the
films.  We will look at the work of some Asian- and African-American film makers
and explore how Third World film challenges Western cinematic conventions by
creating a unique range of alternative cinema practice. 


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THEATER DEPARTMENT	
112 FINE ARTS CENTER		
545-3490
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TH 130 	
Contemporary Playwrights of Color (ALD)  	
Roberta Uno
Thursday 12:20 - 2:15 pm

Theater movements of Blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans, and the body
of literature by Third World American playwrights within a historical context. 

TH 497A
Outreach Theater	
Harley Erdman
Tuesday 2:30 - 5:15 pm

A hands-on course which explores improvisation, role-playing and theater games for
empowerment and social change. An important component of the course is a service
project each student undertakes in the greater community. No prerequisites. Course
is open to non-theatre majors.


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